250 Things You Can Do to Make Your Cat Adore You

250 Things You Can Do to Make Your Cat Adore You

5.0 2
by Ingrid Newkirk
     
 

There are happy cats, and there are happy cats. Which kind of cat is yours? You may be surprised...

Here it is, straight and simple. Even the most well-intentioned, doting cat owner can (and often does) create an environment in which the beloved feline feels less than comfortable. Think about it: we humans create homes that feel, smell, sound, and

Overview

There are happy cats, and there are happy cats. Which kind of cat is yours? You may be surprised...

Here it is, straight and simple. Even the most well-intentioned, doting cat owner can (and often does) create an environment in which the beloved feline feels less than comfortable. Think about it: we humans create homes that feel, smell, sound, and look good to us — not our cat. But fear not. Here in 250 Things You Can Do To Make Your Cat Adore You, a top animal expert, cat lover, and listener gives you insight from the cat's point of view, as well as practical and simple things you can do, to accommodate the cat's wishes so that nothing feels, smells, sounds, looks, or tastes at best unappealing, at worst harmful. With tips on how to:

  • read your pet's body language
  • use holistic remedies for common cat maladies
  • discover human traits that cats love — and loathe

and much, much more. With this book you can end kitty boredom forever and improve most behavior or health problems if they exist. And if they don't, here's an opportunity to make your happy cat happier!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780684836485
Publisher:
Touchstone
Publication date:
05/15/1998
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
0.48(w) x 5.50(h) x 8.50(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

Home, Sweet Home

Or, is it? Could it be that your cat is living only one of her nine lives in a human-oriented dwelling place, and worse, living at ground level? Let me elaborate: Before cats belonged to human beings, they belonged to themselves. They answered to no one unless they felt like it. In fact, before fourteen-wheelers and human beings got into the act, cats had no natural enemies to speak of, except parasites, and even then, they knew which plants to chew on to fight off illness and even managed to pass on their folk remedies to their youngsters.

Yes, cats used to be self-sufficient in those halcyon days before we, if I may borrow Joni Mitchell's lyrics, paved their paradise and put up a parking lot. Cats also got along perfectly well, thank you very much, without can openers and litter boxes. Sure, they probably wouldn't have said no to a catnip toy, but their lives were full without such artificial stimulants.

They were whole, dignified, free-roaming, independent souls. They carved out their own, often vast, patches of turf, defended them with their own spit and claws, enjoyed a social life with friends and family, had the opportunity to flirt and to select and reject suitors, raised the kids, provided balanced meals for their families without benefit of advice from nutrition experts, and still had time to play "pounce." We humans were about as necessary to their existence as a bowling ball.

Now look at modern kitty's confines. Your cat is probably stuck inside a wood and cement box with compartments — otherwise known as your home.

Before you protest, "But I live there, too," chances are you leave your house or apartment every day. Sometimes you are in and out of the door so fast that your cat's image of you amounts to a big blur. Sometimes you are out and about so much, your cat can't remember what you look like.

Out in the real world, you see things your cat would give an eye tooth to see. You interact with others of your own kind, even if that only means swearing at the driver in front of you who brakes for falling leaves. Your brain and body are actively engaged, whether it's greeting neighbors and friends, running for the bus, drafting a memo, or making change.

Meanwhile, your cat is probably back home, staring at the wall. At least your cat should be indoors, unless you are conducting supervised leisure or exercise time, because today's outside world is a dangerous place for a cat, full of traffic and strangers with candy in their pockets who want to take your cat for a little ride. This means your cat is virtually a shut-in! Your home is his entire world.

Take a look around Cat World. Unless you live somewhere like the Hearst Castle, there's probably not much to it from a cat's perspective. This calls for action! You have to fool Kittums into thinking you live in the most interesting place on Earth. You have to enrich his otherwise drab little life.

Meet the Author

Ingrid Newkirk, cofounder of PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals), is the acclaimed author of Save the Animals! 101 Things You Can Do, Kids Can Save the Animals, and The Compassionate Cook. She lives in Washington, D.C.

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250 Things You Can Do to Make Your Cat Adore You 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book with practical advice on how to create a happy and stimulating home for your feline companions.