3 Bears and Goldilocks
  • Alternative view 1 of 3 Bears and Goldilocks
  • Alternative view 2 of 3 Bears and Goldilocks
  • Alternative view 3 of 3 Bears and Goldilocks
  • Alternative view 4 of 3 Bears and Goldilocks
<Previous >Next

3 Bears and Goldilocks

by Margaret Willey, Heather M. Solomon
     
 

We all know that Goldilocks has a lot to say about the Three Bears. Everything they have is either too hot or too cold or too big or too lumpy or too hard or too soft or too completely, absolutely wrong. Only one of them can get anything right! Just right, that is.

But have you ever wondered, even for the littlest mini-second, what the Three Bears think about

Overview

We all know that Goldilocks has a lot to say about the Three Bears. Everything they have is either too hot or too cold or too big or too lumpy or too hard or too soft or too completely, absolutely wrong. Only one of them can get anything right! Just right, that is.

But have you ever wondered, even for the littlest mini-second, what the Three Bears think about her?

Well, it turns out those bears have a thing or two, or three, to say...

Margaret Willey turns this fav-orite classic upside down...because there's always another side to the story....

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
This retelling of the traditional tale features a bold and curious Goldilocks. At the start, she is being admonished by her father to be careful. He tells her not rush headlong into places where she does not belong. Goldilocks sets out for the forest and soon discovers a small cabin. She knocks three times on the door and, receiving no answer, walks in. The place is a mess; leaves, berry stems, and fish bones are strewn about. Goldilocks sweeps the debris into a large pile. The porridge on the table is not very appetizing, containing beetles, bark, and lumps of grass. Goldilocks picks these items out, pours honey over the rest, and eats the contents of the smallest bowl. Looking for a comfortable place to rest, she discovers three beds. These are composed of straw, leaves, pine needles, and bird feathers covered by fuzzy blankets. She falls asleep on the smallest one. When the bears find her, they take pity on such a small creature. Goldilocks wakes, jumps through a window, and runs home. The illustrations are bright and colorful, depicting the bears' home as something between a natural den and a human house. This book could be used as a story starter to encourage children to write their own original versions of the tale. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 3

Set in "the farthest reaches of the far north," this version of the tale features a plucky lass who, warned by her father "...not to rush headlong into places where you don't belong," nevertheless ventures into the forest and into the bears' messy "cabin," which she sweeps clean. Removing the beetles and other unappealing lumps from Baby Bear's porridge, she eats all of the cereal, then settles down on his small, soft bed for a short snooze. Returning from a walk, the bears, at first annoyed by the rearrangement of their domain, take pity on the "poor creature" they find sleeping in Baby Bear's bed, but Goldilocks reacts with fear and bolts the premises. There is a rustic feel to the illustrations, rendered in watercolor, collage, colored pencil, acrylic, and oil paint. The bears' residence is shown to be a sort of rustic hogan constructed of bent saplings, vines, and bark, the interior strewn with pieces of the outdoors and the remains of meals. Large bowls hold porridge dotted with dead beetles, lumps of grass, and other natural matter. Beds are made from blankets thrown over piles of leaves, feathers, and other forest detritus. Woven baskets and earthenware bowls and vases sit on and around a great stone fireplace. Written and illustrated by the same pair that created Clever Beatrice (S & S, 2001), this satisfying read-aloud offers a new twist on an old favorite.-Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH

Kirkus Reviews
This Goldilocks is as headstrong as ever. One raised eyebrow and a pert look at the reader during her father's morning advice-to not rush into places she doesn't belong-signals that this imprudent protagonist is headed for trouble. Unlike Jon Scieszka's The Stinky Cheese Man, Willey's text plays at the edges, adjusting some minor details while maximizing the story's moral message. The bear's "cabin" is lair-like, littered with fish bones and fur; their beds are piles of leaves and feathers; their porridge, a mixture of beetles and scales. Upon finding the intruder of their home is a clawless creature without sharp teeth, the bears' anger turns to sympathy. But before the bears can act Goldilocks wakes and runs, making it safely home to a father who asks if she's remembered his earlier advice. Solomon's use of collage adds a realistic texture and richness to the images, lending a visual interest to the narrative, the changes in which neither enhance nor upend the original classic. (Picture book/folktale. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416924944
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
09/30/2008
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,130,652
Product dimensions:
9.20(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Heather M. Solomon was named a Publishers Weekly Flying Start for Clever Beatrice, winner of the Charlotte Zolotow Award. She is also the illustrator of Clever Beatrice and the Best Little Pony by Margaret Willey and If I Were a Lion by Sarah Weeks. She lives in New Mexico with her husband, daughter, and son, who especially love to share joyous secrets.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >