30 Years a Watchtower Slave: The Confessions of a Converted Jehovah's Witness
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30 Years a Watchtower Slave: The Confessions of a Converted Jehovah's Witness

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by William J. Schnell
     
 

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At first, the Watchtower Society seemed harmless to William J. Schnell, even valuable as a way to develop his faith in God and pass it on to others. This book is Schnell's fascinating account of his involvement with the cult, which effectively enticed him in the 1920s and continues to lure countless individuals today. Readers will learn, as Schnell did, that the

Overview

At first, the Watchtower Society seemed harmless to William J. Schnell, even valuable as a way to develop his faith in God and pass it on to others. This book is Schnell's fascinating account of his involvement with the cult, which effectively enticed him in the 1920s and continues to lure countless individuals today. Readers will learn, as Schnell did, that the Jehovah's Witness religion he had joined was anything but innocent. For thirty years he was enslaved by one of the most totalitarian religions of our day, and his story of finally becoming free is riveting.
Readers will be alerted to the inner machinations, methods, and doctrines of the Watchtower Society, arming them to forewarn others and witness to their Jehovah's Witness friends, relatives, neighbors, and the stranger at the door. With more than 300,000 copies sold, 30 Years a Watchtower Slave is truly one of the classic testimonies of freedom from a powerful cult.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801063848
Publisher:
Baker Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/01/2002
Edition description:
Abridged Edition
Pages:
214
Sales rank:
638,143
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.46(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

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30 Years a Watchtower Slave: The Confessions of a Converted Jehovah's Witness 2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
QuestaGirl More than 1 year ago
I was a Jehovah's Witness for 15 years back in the 1970s and 80s. I first read this book AFTER I stopped believing in their teachings. I found it very interesting and eye-opening. I have been a born-again Christian since 1988. I am currently working on a BA in Christian Theology and wanted this as a reference book. If you are wondering about the Watchtower Society and their doctrines, I highly suggest you read this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
It is apparent upon reading this book that the author has a clear cut idea of what he is talking about. The Jehovah's Witness (JW's) ironically consider all Christians outside their beliefs 'slaves' so I understand where the author is coming from with his title. Also, more fitting, is what the Watchtower is...a slavery. To all those once associated with the Watchtower and those who have loved ones within it's grasp know how hurtful this society is. Unfortunately the ideas and ideals of the group have no true religious base to them. Though they do come from bibles used in Christianity, the man who founded the group had absolutely no religious background, and wrote his deity in retaliation of his parents when he was 17 when they told him he might go to Hell. To all those considering acceptance to Jehovah's Witness please read this book and the books of others. This is no light issue. Every Christian should be aware of the cult's tight grasp it wraps around it's people.
gragonfly More than 1 year ago
this read serves well for anyone that's considering joining this belief system or find it interesting...the writer knows what he's talking about ( how i'm i so sure ? SIMPLE. his experience ( 30 long years ) / INTERNAL INFORMATION ( of course, the witnesses will overlook his INTERNAL concrete evidence / case - denail). a sweet read with light.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you took a man from any country that was not a wittness and put him in a watchtower factory to work he would recognize it for what it was, a cult with robotic slaves who are afraid to say what they really think about their situation for fear of being kicked out. The truth is the truth and a slave is a slave. You are either free to think for yourself or your not. I was a witness for 20 years and knew I couldn't share what I felt about the class society of the witnesses, or what I beleived certain scriptures to mean. If I said what I thought or felt I would have been disfellowshiped but I'm happy to say after a through investigation with the help of publications like 30 years WT slave I was able to leave of my own accord.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Upon reading this book, I found the author talking about dates mostly from the late 19th century through the 40's. He calls himself a slave, but a slave doesn't vounteer! I have to agree with the other commentator here that he shows no point in his life that could be deemed slavery. I know many Witnesses, both in and out of the organization and once again, I agree with the preceding comments that they kept the beliefs and left the organization.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's apparent in the reviews that the people have no idea what they're talking about. Many JW's do feel enslaved by the organization. They are not allowed to associate with any one outside of the organization- only with fellow JW's- thus cutting them off from the world. This is much like an abusive relationship where a man cuts off a woman's family and friends, leaving the woman dependent on him, making it harder to leave. As adults, when they find out that JW's are a cult and choose to leave- they are cut off from the ONLY friends and family they know! It's a shame that so many people have a misconception of what it's like to grow up in a cult like this. If you haven't been a Jehovah Witness- don't judge this man who has! You have no idea what it's like.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This Book Is very interesting but yey very confusing. As I see it The Organization never forced him to do anything nor to convert. It was a choice he made on his own. It's sad to see that he considered himself a slave. I know many Witnesses and Those people whom have chosen to leave the religion have done it for a resason. They walked away with one good thing, They walked away with the beleives. I just would hope that peoples whom are like this would spend there time writing books about cooking or gardening instead of wasting there time..
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jehova wittnesses arent even a cult all this so called "eye-opening information" is so wrong.