33 Men: Inside the Miraculous Survival and Dramatic Rescue of the Chilean Miners [NOOK Book]

Overview

Award-winning journalist Jonathan Franklin chronicles the harrowing account of the 33 Chilean miners who were trapped underground for fourteen weeks in the fall of 2010.

Franklin, with his renowned eye for detail and dialogue, captures the remarkable story of these men to reveal to the world how they used their native talents to survive against all odds in a savage ...
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33 Men: Inside the Miraculous Survival and Dramatic Rescue of the Chilean Miners

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Overview

Award-winning journalist Jonathan Franklin chronicles the harrowing account of the 33 Chilean miners who were trapped underground for fourteen weeks in the fall of 2010.

Franklin, with his renowned eye for detail and dialogue, captures the remarkable story of these men to reveal to the world how they used their native talents to survive against all odds in a savage environment.
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Editorial Reviews

James M. Tabor
A disaster book's success depends on multiple factors. Speedy publication and new information are two musts. 33 Men is both first out of the gate on this event and rich with revelations. Serendipity is important, too—being in the right place at the right time—but even that is not enough. Twenty-nine people survived the 1996 disaster on Mount Everest, but it took a Jon Krakauer to write Into Thin Air. A couple of thousand journalists were in the right place at the right time in Chile in the summer of 2010. 33 Men is proof that Franklin was the right man among them to write the book.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
The dramatic story of 33 trapped Chilean miners captivated the world for more than two months in the summer of 2010, but Dante himself could not have conjured a ring of hell like the one British journalist Franklin describes in his fascinating account of the miners' ordeal.Sealed a half-mile underground after a 700,000-ton piece of earth collapsed at the notoriously unsafe San Jose mine in Copiapo, Chile, the miners endured 17 days in darkness, 90 degree heat and 95% humidity, ingesting just a single spoonful of rationed tuna every two days, and metallic, oil-laden water from an underground tank before rescue workers miraculously made contact. With a narrow shoot in place, through which supplies could be delivered, the next 50 days became a test of human endurance unparalleled in modern history. Physically, the men endured only minor ailments: an infected tooth, fungal infections caused by the subterranean environment, but, overall, they stayed remarkably healthy in a situation where even a mild case of diarrhea could have proven fatal. Their psychological health, however, was more tenuous. After rallying around a leader, miner Mario Sepulveda, petty jealousies, stress, tension and boredom set in, all while the fragile mine constantly creaked and shattered around them, a Sword of Damocles that seemed poised to crush the men at any moment. In the first days of their ordeal, the men initially formed something of a democracy, a work schedule and a meritocracy that gave them purpose, and unity. But as supplies began to flow into the mine—including television, letters, and eventually, contraband, like marijuana—those bonds began to fray. Their hell was exacerbated by the efforts of a government psychologist, Alberto Iturra, who treated the miners like subjects in a Skinner Box, frequently drawing the men’s ire by censoring their mail, and insisting on daily evaluations. At one point, doctors contemplated sending the men inflatable sex dolls to relieve their tension. Reason prevailed, however, and the men had to settle for pornography. Above ground, tensions also ran high, and Franklin’s brisk narrative captures the turmoil that simmered in “Camp Hope,” the makeshift tent city where the miner’s families, rescue workers, and the press had camped, and the site of a full-blown media circus, as well as the intense pressure on the Peruvian government, led by President Pinera, just months after a devastating earthquake had ravaged the country. Stories of innovation, bravery, and good decisions are also abundant, however, in Franklin's admirably unsentimental account. Perhaps the best decision, was Pinera's call to authorize three separate rescue efforts, a decision that kicked off a good-natured race among rescue crews, and guarded against an eggs-in-one-basket failure. That strategy paid off against long odds: an American-led team with an ingenious pneumatic drill reached the miners almost a month faster than initially projected, on day 67. The miners ascended a day later, one-by-one, clad in Oakley sunglasses, a most improbable happy ending, and a rare, uplifting moment, Franklin observes, in a decade marred by global terror, famine, genocide, earthquakes, tsunamis and floods. “By August, 2010, the world seemed starved of hope,” Franklin writes, “but the bravery of 33 men and a band of generous and tenacious rescue workers brought the world together.” -By Andrew Richard Albanese The 24/7 coverage may make you think you already know the miners' story—but, you don’t, and this fast-moving, yet in-depth account is a testament to the enduring value of good, old-fashioned journalism—and, of course, a great story. It could easily have been different, of course. The situation could have ended quickly, in tragedy, or, worse, with an underground version of Lord of the Flies. Instead, the story of “Los 33” stands as a historic triumph of the human spirit. By Andrew Richard Albanese
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101513224
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 2/14/2011
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 516,439
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Jonathan Franklin has lived in Chile for more than fifteen years, twelve of those as The Guardian (UK) correspondent for Chile.


Granted a Rescue Team credential at the site of the Chilean mine disaster, his dispatches ran in The Guardian, The Washington Post, The Observer (UK) and The Sydney Morning Herald.   As cameraman at the mine, he filmed exclusive footage for ABC News, CNN International, Univision and the Discovery Channel.


Fluent in Spanish, Franklin has covered events ranging from the arrest of Augusto Pinochet to the inner workings of the cocaine trade during his years in South America.  His features are regularly published in GQ, Esquire, Marie Claire, Playboy and many other magazines.  As cofounder of www.AddictVillage.com, Mr. Franklin travels throughout Latin America to produce reports for magazines and newspapers worldwide. His investigative reporting has been used by ABC’s Nightline, CBS’s 60 Minutes, A&E, the BBC and numerous documentary productions worldwide.


An American who was raised in Lincoln, Massachusetts, and attended Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, Franklin moved to Chile in 1994 and currently resides in Santiago with his wife, Toty Garfe, and his six daughters.






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Table of Contents

Prologue: The Eyes of the World 1

1 Buried Alive 7

2 A Desperate Search 27

3 Stuck in Hell 451

4 Speed vs. Precision 69

5 17 Days of Silence 93

6 A Bonanza at the Bottom of the Mine 113

7 Crawling Back to Life 131

8 The Marathon 155

9 TV Reality 175

10 Finish Line in Sight 197

11 The Final Days 217

12 The Final Preparations 233

13 The Rescue 257

14 First Days of Freedom 275

Epilogue: The Triumph of Hope 295

Author's Note 301

Acknowledgments 305

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 30 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(3)

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(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2012

    Interesting read!

    This book is a fast read, informative, and thought provoking! I appreciate being able to be part of the rescue as well as having insight into the trapped miners. You will want to view the rescue again as it brings memories of those days when the world stopped and watched this amazing rescue!

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  • Posted March 16, 2012

    Recommend

    Even though the world watched this event through intensive media coverage, the book is worth reading. It give interesting psychological insights and details about each miner.

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  • Posted August 22, 2011

    Great read

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Posted July 11, 2011

    Worthwhile, dignified

    I think you will want to view YouTube clips of this event while reading the book. I think you will find the author's style both factual and reserved. This does not mean boring, rather it is not exploitative. Mr. Franklin evenhandedly deals with the personalities of the miners, their circumstance and the international response to their entrapment. There is nothing gratuitous in the telling of the story.I wanted philosophical insight. It is there. Some is stated and some must be developed by reflection after the reading. I suppose in a rush to print, the psychological and medical findings would be more than one should expect.I get a sense that this knowledge was considered proprietary by those involved with it anyhow. I recommend this book. It reads fast and does teach.

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