365 More Simple Science Experiments with Everyday Materials
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365 More Simple Science Experiments with Everyday Materials

by Judy Breckenridge, Anthony D. Fredericks, Louis V. Loeschnig, Muriel Mandell
     
 

Illustrated by Frances Zweifel

  • This companion to the popular 365 Simple Science Experiments fills a whole new year with fun, easy and educational hands-on experiments. Kids will learn basic scientific concepts, covering everything from nature, physics, time, chemistry and space.
  • The fundamentals of science are brought to life in an informative and
  • Overview

    Illustrated by Frances Zweifel

  • This companion to the popular 365 Simple Science Experiments fills a whole new year with fun, easy and educational hands-on experiments. Kids will learn basic scientific concepts, covering everything from nature, physics, time, chemistry and space.
  • The fundamentals of science are brought to life in an informative and colorful text that children ages seven and up can easily follow by themselves. Simple, clear and safe instructions explain the experiments all of which use everyday materials found in most homes.
  • Projects range from mastering helicopter flight with a pencil and piece of cardboard to building bird-nests, preserving spider webs and constructing a "cigar box" guitar (to understand sound waves).
  • More than 700 lively illustrations give visual aids to help set up the experiments.

  • Editorial Reviews

    Children's Literature - Susan Hepler
    This edition contains the same experiments from five previous titles such as Simple Physics Experiments with Everyday Materials (1993) and Simple Time Experiments with Everyday Materials (1995) helpfully combined and reorganized into new categories. Areas of discovery include heat, air, water, light, gravity, sound, food, clocks and time, ecosystems, flight, outer space, and rocketry. Each experiment illustrates some property-such as sound travels better through a tube or sugar burns while salt does not. Each activity is presented in four parts: "What to do," "What happens," "Why" and "What next." While teachers and students may conduct the experiment and see the results for themselves, the clean format enables learners to visualize properties and learn the "whys" and "wherefores" without actually leaving their chairs. Most experiments demand very little in the way of materials, usually requiring only common household items, while a few cooking experiments demand adult supervision. Most can be done by any elementary-age child. Glossary and index are included, and black line illustrations tinted pink or orange lighten the page or picture the set-up, but otherwise teach little.

    Product Details

    ISBN-13:
    9781579120351
    Publisher:
    Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, Inc.
    Publication date:
    08/01/1998
    Pages:
    320
    Product dimensions:
    8.31(w) x 9.50(h) x 1.00(d)
    Lexile:
    IG1030L (what's this?)
    Age Range:
    8 - 13 Years

    Read an Excerpt

    1 + 1 Does Not Always = 2

    You might be a good math student, but you will have to be a good physics student to figure out this experiment.

    You will need:

    - large-size glass jar

    - masking tape

    - pen

    - cup of sugar

    - measuring cup

    - paper towel

    - drinking straw

    - warm water

    What to do: Place a strip of masking tape down the outside of the jar. Pour one cup of warm water into the jar and mark the level that it reaches on the tape. Then, add a second cup of warm water and, again mark the water level on the tape. Empty all of the water out of the jar and dry the inside of it with a paper towel. Now, pour one cup of warm water into the jar. Follow that with one cup of sugar. Stir this solution well with the straw and then check the liquid level on the masking-tape measuring strip.

    What happens: The liquid level of one cup of water plus one cup of sugar does not reach the two-cup mark of the tape.

    Why: If you caught the clue word, solution, when you were instructed to stir the sugar and water together, you probably know the answer. The substances in a solution fit neatly together, like puzzle parts. Instead of taking up their own space, the grains of sugar simply fill in the empty spaces around the water molecules to make something entirely new, a solution called sugar water...but less of it than you thought you would have when you added the sugar and water measurements.

    The Talking Coin

    You may have heard somebody say that money talks, but until you do this experiment you have probably never actually seen it speak.

    You will need:

    - plastic 2-liter bottle

    - quarter

    - cup of water

    - freezer

    - kitchen timer or watch

    What to do: Put the quarter in the cup of water and place the empty bottle in the freezer for five minutes. When the time is up, remove the bottle from the freezer and, immediately, cover the mouth of the bottle with the wet coin. (It is important to completely cover the bottle's mouth with the coin.)

    What happens: The quarter becomes a tongue for the bottle and begins to chatter to you.

    Why: When the bottle was put into the freezer, the air molecules inside of it cooled and moved closer together. Since the air in the bottle then took up less space, it left room for extra air to flow in - so it did.

    When the bottle was removed from the freezer, however, the air molecules inside of it began to warm up and spread out again. It's a great example of, "There was enough room for everyone to sit comfortably in the car until we all put on coats and it was crowded." Suddenly there was no room for the extra air molecules.

    It is that "extra air" that is being pushed out of the bottle as the air warms that makes the coin move up and down as if it were talking.

    "Boil, Boil Magical Water"

    Would you believe you can boil water without using a stove? Here's the key to this old, well-kept secret.

    You will need:

    - clear drinking glass (a

    Meet the Author

    n/a

    E. Richard Churchill,Louis V. Loeschnig, and Muriel Mandell are authors of books in the No-Sweat Science series, published by Sterling Publishers. They each have written several other science-related books for children and young adults.

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