3D Game Engine Design: A Practical Approach to Real-Time Computer Graphics

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"Virtually all the books on building 3D game engines cover the basics: here's a polygon, here's a transformation matrix, here's a perspective projection, and so on. The problem is that you can't make a professional quality game with just the basics. This leaves a large gap between you and your goal of creating a great game engine. With this book, Dave is launching a huge boulder into the gap, helping you scamper to your destination."

-- Eric Yiskis Lead Programmer, Oddworld Inhabitants

3D Game Engine Design is ...

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Overview

"Virtually all the books on building 3D game engines cover the basics: here's a polygon, here's a transformation matrix, here's a perspective projection, and so on. The problem is that you can't make a professional quality game with just the basics. This leaves a large gap between you and your goal of creating a great game engine. With this book, Dave is launching a huge boulder into the gap, helping you scamper to your destination."

-- Eric Yiskis Lead Programmer, Oddworld Inhabitants

3D Game Engine Design is the first book to go beyond basic descriptions of algorithms and accurately demonstrate the complex engineering process required to design and build a real-time graphics engine to support physical realism. Faster algorithms will always win out over faster processors and assembly-language optimization techniques. Implementing those algorithms, however, can be a challenge for even experienced programmers.

This book provides rigorous explanations and derivations of all the essential concepts and techniques. Ideas are revealed step by step with numerous code examples and illustrations. Source code implementations are included on the companion CD-ROM to help you understand the full progression from idea, to algorithm, to working code. Since algorithms are not used in isolation, the source code for a complete engine is provided to bring crucial context to the implementations. This book and CD-ROM offer the most comprehensive professional reference available for the development of 3D game engines.

Features

  • Designed for professionals working in game development, simulation, scientific visualization, or virtual worlds.
  • Written by a respected game engineer and designer of a leading commercial game engine.
  • Thoroughly describes the algorithms-fully implemented in working code-that are the key to writing the fastest, most efficient code possible.
  • Provides source code for Windows 95/98/NT/2000, Linux/Unix, and Macintosh platforms.
Includes a CD-ROM for use with Windows 95/98/2000, NT, and Linux with C++ source code implementations of all the algorithms covered in the text as well as source code for a complete game engine. The source code is now available for Macintosh users and can be found at the WildMagic URL listed below. The renderer layer of the engine is abstract and can work with whichever API is desired. An OpenGL-based renderer is included, but it is just as easy to implement a Direct3D version. A GLUT-based hardware renderer for either Windows or Linux is included as well. Updates for the engine are available at wild-magic.com, along with a FAQ, and additional material on real-time graphics.

Author Biography: Dave Eberly is the President of Magic Software, Inc., a company known for its Web site that offers free source code and documentation for computer graphics, image analysis, and numerical methods. Previously, he was the Director of Engineering at Numerical Design Limited, the company responsible for the real-time 3D game engine, NetImmerse. His background includes a B.A. degree in mathematics from Bloomsburg University, M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is co-author with Philip Schneider of the forthcoming Geometry Tools for Computer Graphics, to be published by Morgan Kaufmann.

Audience: Professionals or students working in game development, simulation, scientific visualization, or virtual worlds.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Dave Eberly is the president of Geometric Tools, Inc. (www.geometrictools.com), a company that specializes in software development for computer graphics, image analysis, and numerical methods. Previously, he was the director of engineering at Numerical Design Ltd. (NDL), the company responsible for the real-time 3D game engine, NetImmerse. He also worked for NDL on Gamebryo, which was the next-generation engine after NetImmerse. His background includes a BA degree in mathematics from Bloomsburg University, MS and PhD degrees in mathematics from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and MS and PhD degrees in computer science from the University of North Carolina at ChapelHill. He is the author of 3D Game Engine Design, 2nd Edition (2006), 3D Game Engine Architecture (2005), Game Physics (2004), and coauthor with Philip Schneider of Geometric Tools for Computer Graphics (2003), all published by Morgan Kaufmann. As a mathematician, Dave did research in the mathematics of combustion, signal and image processing, and length-biased distributions in statistics. He was an associate professor at the University of Texas at San Antonio with an adjunct appointment in radiology at the U.T. Health Science Center at San Antonio. In 1991, he gave up his tenured position to re-train in computer science at the University of North Carolina. After graduating in 1994, he remained for one year as a research associate professor in computer science with a joint appointment in the Department of Neurosurgery, working in medical image analysis. His next stop was the SAS Institute, working for a year on SAS/Insight, a statistical graphics package. Finally, deciding that computer graphics and geometry were his real calling, Dave went to work for NDL (which is now Emergent Game Technologies), then to Magic Software, Inc., which later became Geometric Tools, Inc. Dave's participation in the newsgroup comp.graphics.algorit

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Table of Contents

List of Figures
List of Tables
Preface
Ch. 1 Introduction 1
Ch. 2 Geometrical Methods 7
2.1 Transformations 8
2.2 Coordinate Systems 10
2.3 Quaternions 11
2.4 Euler Angles 18
2.5 Standard 3D Objects 26
2.6 Distance Methods 38
Ch. 3 The Graphics Pipeline 79
3.1 Model and World Coordinates 80
3.2 Perspective Projection 80
3.3 Camera Models 84
3.4 Culling and Clipping 91
3.5 Surface and Vertex Attributes 99
3.6 Rasterizing 113
3.7 An Efficient Clipping and Lighting Pipeline 132
3.8 Issues of Software, Hardware, and APIS 138
Ch. 4 Hierarchical Scene Representations 141
4.1 Tree-Based Representation 143
4.2 Updating a Scene Graph 147
4.3 Rendering a Scene Graph 157
Ch. 5 Picking 169
5.1 Intersection of a Linear Component and a Sphere 171
5.2 Intersection of a Linear Component and a Box 172
5.3 Intersection of a Linear Component and a Capsule 179
5.4 Intersection of a Linear Component and a Lozenge 180
5.5 Intersection of a Linear Component and a Cylinder 181
5.6 Intersection of a Linear Component and an Ellipsoid 182
5.7 Intersection of a Linear Component and a Triangle 182
Ch. 6 Collision Detection 185
6.1 Design Issues 186
6.2 Intersection of Dynamic Objects and Lines 188
6.3 Intersection of Dynamic Objects and Planes 193
6.4 Static Object-Object Intersection 203
6.5 Dynamic Object-Object Intersection 214
6.6 Oriented Bounding Box Trees 244
6.7 Processing of Rotating and Moving Objects 245
Ch. 7 Curves 257
7.1 Definitions 258
7.2 Reparameterization by Arc Length 260
7.3 Special Curves 261
7.4 Subdivision 276
7.5 Orientation of Objects on Curved Paths 285
Ch. 8 Surfaces 287
8.1 Definitions 288
8.2 Curvature 289
8.3 Special Surfaces 293
8.4 Subdivision 306
Ch. 9 Animation of Characters 341
9.1 Key Frame Animation 342
9.2 Inverse Kinematics 348
9.3 Skinning 356
Ch. 10 Geometric Level of Detail 359
10.1 Sprites and Billboards 360
10.2 Discrete Level of Detail 361
10.3 Continuous Level of Detail 362
Ch. 11 Terrain 369
11.1 Terrain Topology 370
11.2 Vertex Based Simplification 373
11.3 Block-Based Simplification 375
11.4 Vertex Dependencies 381
11.5 Block Rendering 383
11.6 The Full Algorithm 385
11.7 Other Issues 392
11.8 Height Fields from Point Sets or Triangle Meshes 398
Ch. 12 Spatial Sorting 411
12.1 Quadtrees and Octrees 412
12.2 Portals 413
12.3 Binary Space Partitioning 417
Ch. 13 Special Effects 427
13.1 Lens Flare 427
13.2 Environment Mapping 428
13.3 Bump Mapping 429
13.4 Volumetric Fogging 430
13.5 Projected Lights 430
13.6 Projected Shadows 431
13.7 Particle Systems 432
13.8 Morphing 433
App. A Object-Oriented Infrastructure 435
App. B Numerical Methods 469
Glossary 509
Bibliography 521
Index 527
About the Author 557
About the CD-ROM 559
Trademarks 561
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2002

    a must for the professional

    This text applies a rigorous mathematical background to the design of 3D graphic engines. I suggest that you pick up some textbooks on linear algebra and introductory 3D transforms before delving into the underlying structure that this book exposes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2001

    A usable approach to realtime 3D Graphics

    The well-written book truly delivers on its promise to provide the information needed to get a 3D game engine together. Some of the items I enjoyed most were the detailed description of different ways of doing things with examples. The wealth of code examples is also good, though you would probably want to get the latest from the web site as soon as you get the book. If you are looking for good object oriented approach to a 3D engine this has a very good OpenGL approach.

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