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4:21... The Day After
     

4:21... The Day After

by Method Man
 

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Ever since the release of the somewhat disappointing Tical 0: The Prequel, Method Man has been trying to prove that he really is the MC he was on his fantastic 1994 solo debut. So maybe the fact that he decided to name his fourth record 4:21...The Day After has less to do with marijuana (though of course that is never

Overview

Ever since the release of the somewhat disappointing Tical 0: The Prequel, Method Man has been trying to prove that he really is the MC he was on his fantastic 1994 solo debut. So maybe the fact that he decided to name his fourth record 4:21...The Day After has less to do with marijuana (though of course that is never completely forgotten) and more to do with moving away from all the comparisons to his first album, Tical (and the subsequent Tical-themed titles that came after). And while 4:21 may be an improvement over his previous releases, Method Man's not quite the funny yet insightful rapper he was on his debut. To his credit, however, there are still some pretty good tracks on the album, including "Say," with a Lauryn Hill-covering-Bob Marley sample; "Dirty Mef," which has a verse from deceased Clansman Ol' Dirty Bastard; and "Walk On" featuring cohort Redman, and when Method Man spits out "Me and my soldier, we're taking over/taking payola from all those stations and record labels" over a beat by RZA and Erick Sermon (both of whom appear multiple times), you almost believe that he's going to make a comeback. Unfortunately, there are enough songs on 4:21 that are so utterly boring that the claim of redemption can't be made quite yet. "Got to Have It" is trite and almost hypocritical; the balladic "Let's Ride," which features a chorus from Ginuwine, is completely uninventive; and the closer, "4 Ever," with labelmate Megan Rochell, sounds as if it's trying to capture the energy he and Mary J. Blige had on "I'll Be There for You/You're All I Need to Get By," but ends up seeming more like an empty radio track. There is some good production on the album (besides RZA and Erick Sermon, Scott Storch, Kwamé "K1Mil" and Mathematics all contribute beats), and there are some decent verses as well, both from Method Man and his myriad of guest stars, but they're lacking some of the punch and ingenuity of Tical. Longtime fans should be happy to hear that he's sounding better, but he's going to have to keep making improvements if he wants to win over many new ones.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/29/2006
Label:
Def Jam
UPC:
0602498594179
catalogNumber:
000698602

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Method Man   Primary Artist
RZA   Vocals
Armon Davis   Keyboards
Megan Rochelle   Track Performer

Technical Credits

Ernie Isley   Composer
Chris Jasper   Composer
Kelly Holland   Composer
W. Michael Lewis   Composer
RZA   Arranger,Producer,Executive Producer
Erick Sermon   Arranger,Producer,Executive Producer
Method Man   Executive Producer
R. Noble   Composer
Havoc   Producer
C. Woods   Composer
Lil O   Engineer
J.K. Hunter   Composer
L. Jackson   Composer
Gimel Keaton   Engineer
D. Richard Lewis   Composer
James Ellis   Management
Jose "Choco" Reynoso   Engineer
Dawud West   Art Direction
David "Gordo" Strickland   Engineer
Kinetic   Producer
Justin Rossi   Engineer
Mike Chav   Engineer
Tai Linzie   Photo Coordination
Rob Caiaffa   Marketing
Carol Corless   Package Production
D. D. Klein   Composer
Ayinde "Tike" Olubayu   Engineer
Erni Vales   Illustrations
Mike Dupus   Engineer
P. Charles   Composer
Scott Storch   Producer
Patrick Magee   Engineer

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