48 Hours of Kristallnacht

( 3 )

Overview

Prior to Kristallnacht, Jews had little reason to believe their physical safety was at risk. That all changed seventy years ago. “One of the seminal events in Hitler’s goal to destroy European Jewry was the ‘Night of Broken Glass’—Kristallnacht. Mitchell Bard provides a comprehensive and penetrating account that should be read not only as a history of the Holocaust, but also as a lesson for the future.”—Abraham H. Foxman, National Director of the Anti-Defamation League, author of The Deadliest Lies: The Israel ...
See more details below
Hardcover (Reprint)
$17.97
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$19.95 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (19) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $7.11   
  • Used (12) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Prior to Kristallnacht, Jews had little reason to believe their physical safety was at risk. That all changed seventy years ago. “One of the seminal events in Hitler’s goal to destroy European Jewry was the ‘Night of Broken Glass’—Kristallnacht. Mitchell Bard provides a comprehensive and penetrating account that should be read not only as a history of the Holocaust, but also as a lesson for the future.”—Abraham H. Foxman, National Director of the Anti-Defamation League, author of The Deadliest Lies: The Israel Lobby and the Myth of Jewish Control “Kristallnacht’s new Book of Lamentations. The power of Mitchell Bard’s 48 Hours of Kristallnacht derives from the stark and vivid words of German Jewish children who, in a single day, saw their well-ordered world suddenly destroyed by the Nazis’ brutality and by the apathy and silence of their neighbors and classmates.” —Rabbi Abraham Cooper, Associate Dean of the Simon Wiesenthal Center
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Gripping oral history . . . A searing depiction of the Holocaust’s opening ceremonies.” --Kirkus Reviews “The further away we get from the years of the Holocaust, the more necessary it is to recount what happened. One of the seminal events in Hitler’s goal to destroy European Jewry was the “Night of Broken Glass” -- Kristallnacht. Mitchell Bard provides a comprehensive and penetrating account that should be read not only as a history of Holocaust, but as a lesson for the future.” --Abraham H. Foxman, National Director of the Anti-Defamation League and author of The Deadliest Lies: The Israel Lobby and the Myth of Jewish Control and Never Again? The Threat of the New Anti-Semitism “Kristallnacht’s new Book of Lamentations. Mitchell Bard’s 48 Hours of Kristallnacht’s power derives from the stark and vivid words of German Jewish children who, in a single day saw their well-ordered world suddenly destroyed by the Nazis’ brutality and the apathy and silence of neighbors and classmates.” --Rabbi Abraham Cooper, Associate Dean of the Simon Weisnthal Center “The most detailed and thoroughly researched book yet on the events of Kristallnacht.” --Booklist
Library Journal

In a book timed to coincide with the 70th anniversary of Kristallnacht, Bard (director, Jewish Virtual Lib.) interweaves a variety of survivor oral histories into a unique perspective on that tragic event-unique in that the overwhelming majority of these accounts are from people who were teens or preteens in 1938. Telling the story from a child's perspective makes for compelling reading, and Bard's main strength is letting the victims speak with minimal contextual information. This is also one of the book's weaknesses, however, for the transition from Bard's historical context into the survivor accounts does not always flow smoothly. It is also not clear if the intended audience is young adults or general readers because of the sometimes too simplistic context. When discussing the U.S. response to Kristallnacht and Nazism, for example, he acknowledges the role of anti-Semitism and the Great Depression in restricting U.S. immigration, remarking that FDR "could have done far more." Since the issue of FDR's role is subject to intense, polemical debate today, Bard should have acknowledged the controversial nature of the issues. Recommended for school libraries and some specialized collections.
—Frederic Krome

Kirkus Reviews
Eyewitnesses recall the degradation and devastation that 70 years ago marked a point of no return Jews in Germany. Kristallnacht, "the night of broken glass," was actually two nights: November 9 and 10, 1938, when throughout the Third Reich (including the annexed Sudetenland and Austria) crowds engaged in a premeditated, organized pogrom. The assassination of a Nazi functionary in Paris provided the excuse, but in fact Kristallnacht continued the campaign of systematic persecution begun five years earlier with the anti-Semitic Nuremberg Laws; many today consider the brutal term the Nazis originally used, "Jew Action," to be a more accurate summary of their intentions. Bard (Will Israel Survive?, 2007, etc.), the director of the Jewish Virtual Library, culls his griping oral history primarily from survivor accounts collected by other scholars and the Shoah Foundation. Overnight, power and phone lines were cut. Jewish homes, offices and shops all previously identified, were invaded, destroyed and looted. Mobs burned books, furniture, toys, schools and thousands of synagogues. Fire brigades, ready to protect adjacent Aryan property if necessary, stood by and watched the conflagrations. Marauding SS and Brown Shirts scorned Iron Crosses earned by Jewish soldiers in the Great War. They took souvenirs, stole silver and piggy banks, smashed china and pianos-and the glass windows that gave the action its historic sobriquet. Tens of thousands of adult men were seized and sent to concentration camps. Families were broken. Children were scattered. Some Jews emigrated soon after, some were murdered that night, some died by suicide. Kristallnacht has been the subject of scholarly attention, butBard focuses on the experiences of children, reprinting powerful testimonies of the fear they felt and the hatred directed against them. A few gentiles expressed sympathy, but the majority of the German population seemed quite pleased with the Wagnerian events. There would be little popular objection to the murder of millions that was to come. A searing depiction of the Holocaust's opening ceremonies.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781599214450
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/2/2008
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 5.62 (w) x 7.68 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Dr. Mitchell Bard is the Executive Director of the nonprofit American-Israeli Cooperative Enterprise and the director of the Jewish Virtual Library (www.JewishVirtualLibrary.org), the world’s most comprehensive online encyclopedia of Jewish history and culture (which averages nearly 1.5 million visitors per month).
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

IntroductionI. Warning SignsII. A Harsh ChildhoodIII. Coming of Age and Heroes of Another AgeIV. Goodbye DaddyV. Walking Through The Looking GlassVI. Synagogues AflameVII. Saving and Taking LivesVIII. The Road to Hell Appendices Bibliography SourcesAcknowledgments Index About the Author
Read More Show Less

Recipe

On the night of November 9, 1938, rampaging mobs throughout Germany and the newly acquired territories of Austria and Sudetenland freely attacked Jews in the street, in their homes, and at their places of work and worship. Over the next forty-eight hours at least ninety-six Jews were killed and hundreds more injured, as many as 2,000 synagogues were burned, almost 7,500 Jewish businesses were destroyed, cemeteries and schools were vandalized, and 30,000 Jews were arrested and sent to concentration camps. This pogrom has come to be called Kristallnacht, “Night of Broken Glass.”
48 Hours of Kristallnacht is the first book to thoroughly chronicle this pivotal event by presenting a wide array of eyewitness testimony, much of it previously unpublished, and to set the event firmly in historical context. Drawing on his unprecedented access to key archives, Dr. Mitchell G. Bard presents a shocking story that centers on the words of those who, as children, were on the scene first-hand. Together, these accounts and Bard’s incisive analysis reveal what led up to the pogroms, how they transpired, and their aftermath—and why the Holocaust can be dated from these two harrowing nights.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)