5 Stories

( 2 )

Overview

“Little Red’s Tango” incorporates a vampire story, miracle legends, a saint’s legend, an epistle, beatitudes, and jazz minutiae within a contemporary faux-gospel.

“Lapland, or Film Noir” is a journey to a place of the dark, paranoid crime movies made in Los Angeles between 1948 and 1956, which Straub calls “one of the most compelling periods in American film history.”

“The Geezers” is a fascinating exercise in withholding everything that might explain what the protagonists and their friends were up to, and describing instead their reactions to ...

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Overview

“Little Red’s Tango” incorporates a vampire story, miracle legends, a saint’s legend, an epistle, beatitudes, and jazz minutiae within a contemporary faux-gospel.

“Lapland, or Film Noir” is a journey to a place of the dark, paranoid crime movies made in Los Angeles between 1948 and 1956, which Straub calls “one of the most compelling periods in American film history.”

“The Geezers” is a fascinating exercise in withholding everything that might explain what the protagonists and their friends were up to, and describing instead their reactions to the consequences of the unstated actions. It is Straub at his best.

“Donald Duck” is a surreal study of how a family can be changed irrevocably by the decisions of one reckless member.

The final tale, “Mr. Aickman’s Air Rifle” reveals itself in clever homage as Straub deliberately assumes the mantle of “a great and respected elder, with felonious intentions.”

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781455830114
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio
  • Publication date: 7/10/2013
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 5.50 (h) x 0.37 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Straub

Peter Straub is a New York Times bestselling author, most famous for his work in the horror genre being honored as a grand master at the 1998 World Horror Convention. He has won the World Fantasy Award for Koko (1989), and the Bram Stoker Award for his novels The Throat (1993), Mr. X.(1999) and Lost Boy, Lost Girl (2003) as well as for his collection of short stories, 5 Stories (2007). He lives in New York City.

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    1. Hometown:
      New York City
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 2, 1943
    2. Place of Birth:
      Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1965; M.A., Columbia University, 1966
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 20, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Four Out Of Five Ain't Bad

    "Lapland" is the only story that didn't really do it for me. It's an experimental story using Film Noir as a backdrop. It's choppy but, I'm sure it's meant to be that way. It wasn't much of a story to latch onto. The characters in it are paper thin. It's mostly a tale of woe, of a crime gone awry, crosses and double-crosses. Often the usual fare in Film Noir. Perhaps my expectations were too high. Whatever. It's not a bad attempt really. But the substance for me was not there. Now, the other four are better. "The Geezers" is a subtle crime tale with dark menace hidden beneath the surface. The reader would have to figure it out for himself what went on in the last several paragraphs. The characters are there in 3D. Better than "Lapland."
    "Little Red's Tango" is an atmospheric weird tale of a guy named Red. He's got a wall to wall collection of LPs of various jazz musicians. The kind that would make any jazz aficianado jealous. Everything's going until a strange boy appeared out of nowhere. Fevered imagination or supernatural?
    "Donald,Duck!" is an offbeat crime noir tale featuring Disneyesque characters in Hollywood that are burnt-out has-been. And Donald Duck is desperate to get married when he should know better. Yet in past cartoons, when did he ever know any better?
    "Mr. Aickman's Air Rifle" is a weird tale worthy of the classic Twilight Zone. It's basically about days gone by when you no longer remember who your friends are anymore. That's what happened with a protagonist, who is staying at a hospital for a far longer duration than necessary. Especially when his old friends started disappearing.
    Like I said, four out of five ain't bad. Definitely worth the price of admission from the guy who gave us "Ghost Story" and "Koko."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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