50 Harbor Street (Cedar Cove Series #5)

50 Harbor Street (Cedar Cove Series #5)

4.1 136
by Debbie Macomber

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Corrie McAfee 50 Harbor Street Cedar Cove, Washington

Dear Reader,

Considering that I'm married to Cedar Cove's private investigator, you might think I enjoy mysteries. But I don't -- especially when they involve us! Roy's been receiving anonymous postcards and messages asking if we "regret the past." We don't know what they mean...

On a more positive

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Corrie McAfee 50 Harbor Street Cedar Cove, Washington

Dear Reader,

Considering that I'm married to Cedar Cove's private investigator, you might think I enjoy mysteries. But I don't -- especially when they involve us! Roy's been receiving anonymous postcards and messages asking if we "regret the past." We don't know what they mean...

On a more positive note, we're both delighted that our daughter, Linnette, has moved to Cedar Cove to work at the new medical clinic. A while ago I attended the humane society's "Dog and Bachelor Auction," where I bought her a date with Cal Washburn, who works at Cliff Harding's horse farm. Unfortunately Linnette is less enthusiastic about this date than I am.

Speaking of Cliff, the romance between him and Grace Sherman is back on. But that's only one of the many interesting stories here in Cedar Cove. So why don't you drop by for a coffee at my husband's office on Main Street or our house on Harbor and I'll tell you everything that's new!


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Editorial Reviews

The Barnes & Noble Review
Debbie Macomber returns to Cedar Cove, Washington, for the fifth installment in her bestselling series, following 44 Cranberry Point and 311 Pelican Court. Told by Corrie McAfee, this one is sparked by a series of mysterious, unsettling anonymous postcards delivered to 50 Harbor Street, home of Corrie and her P.I. husband, Roy. In addition to answering the question posed by the postcards ("Is there anything you've done you wish you could do over?"), Macomber picks up the story lines and characters from previous books, including Olivia and Jack Griffin, Justine and Seth Gundersen, and the return of the McAfee daughter, Linnette.

Readers love Macomber's insights into the daily challenges of ordinary women -- from stubborn husbands to difficult pregnancies and impulsive children. Her honest portrayals of love at different ages and stages is equally warming, whether it's the teenage crush Allison Cox has on Anson Butler, or the on-again, off-again romance between two seniors, Grace Sherman and Cliff Harding. For new readers, a cast of characters at the front of the book will provide a quick introduction to the residents of Cedar Cove. Ginger Curwen

Product Details

Publication date:
Cedar Cove Series, #5
Product dimensions:
4.19(w) x 6.63(h) x 1.00(d)

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Corrie McAfee was worried. And she knew that her husband, Roy, was too.

Who wouldn't be? Starting in July, Roy -- a private investigator -- had received a series of anonymous postcards, and while the messages weren't overtly threatening, they were certainly distressing.

The first communication, which had been mailed to the office, spoke of regrets. During the intervening weeks, there'd been several others. Corrie had read each postcard so often she'd memorized them all. The first one stated: EVERYONE HAS REGRETS. IS THERE ANYTHING YOU'VE DONE YOU WISH YOU COULD DO OVER? THINK ABOUT IT. There hadn't been a signature then, or on any of the other cards. They'd arrived at infrequent intervals and been mailed from different locations. The cryptic messages kept playing in her mind. The passing of time hadn't helped; she was as much in the dark now, in October, as when she'd seen that first postcard.

There was a final gasping, gurgling sound as the coffee drained into the glass pot. The noise distracted Corrie from her worries for a moment -- long enough to glance out the wide office window that overlooked downtown Cedar Cove, Washington. Serving as Roy's secretary and assistant had its advantages, and in this instance, disadvantages. Sometimes ignorance truly was bliss; the current situation was definitely one of those cases. She'd sleep better if she'd never learned about the mysterious postcards.

And yet . . . even if Roy had managed to keep them hidden from her, she would still have known -- because the last message had been hand-delivered, at night, to their front door. Not to the office like the others, but to their home. Late one evening, someone had walked up the sidewalk and onto the porch of their house. As it happened, Roy and Corrie were entertaining dinner guests that night -- and had opened the door to discover that an unknown person had left a fruit basket and an accompanying note. Chills raced up Corrie's spine at the thought that this person knew their home address.

"Is that coffee ready yet?" Roy called from inside his office. Apparently she hadn't delivered it fast enough.

"Hold your horses -- it's coming." Corrie didn't mean to snap at her husband. Normally she wasn't short-tempered. This uncharacteristic outburst revealed how upset she was by everything that was happening to them. Sighing, she filled a clean mug for Roy and carried it, steam rising, into his office.

"Okay, that does it," she said, putting the coffee on the corner of his desk. "We have to talk."

As if he didn't have a care in the world, Roy leaned back in his chair and locked his fingers behind his head. They'd been married for twenty-seven years, and Corrie found him as attractive now as she had in college. Roy had played football for the University of Washington and been a "big man on campus," as they used to say. He was tall and broad-shouldered, still muscular, his posture as straight as ever. He stayed in good shape without apparent effort, and Corrie envied, just a bit, the fact that he'd never gained any weight. His dark hair had thinned and was streaked with gray, which only added a look of dignity to his appearance.

Of all the women he dated during college, he'd fallen in love with her. Theirs hadn't been an easy courtship, though. They'd broken up for more than a year, and then reunited. Once they were back together, they realized how much they loved each other; there'd been no uncertainty about their feelings. They were married shortly after graduation and their love had endured through trials and tribulations, through good years and bad. They'd had plenty of both.

"Talk about what?" Roy asked casually.

His nonchalance didn't fool Corrie. Her husband knew exactly what was on her mind.

"Does THE PAST HAS A WAY OF CATCHING UP WITH THE PRESENT tell you anything?" she murmured, sitting down in the chair normally reserved for clients. She wanted Roy to understand that she wouldn't be put off easily. She was afraid he knew more about these postcards than he'd let on. It would be just like him to try to protect her.

Roy frowned. "Those messages don't have anything to do with you, so don't worry about it."

His answer infuriated her. "How can you say that? Everything that happens to you affects me."

He seemed about to argue, but after all these years, he recognized that she wasn't going to be satisfied with glib reassurances. "I'm not sure what to tell you. I've made enemies and, yes, I have regrets, but who doesn't?"

Roy had reached the rank of detective for the Seattle Police Department and been forced into early retirement because of a back injury. In the beginning, Corrie had been excited to have her husband at home. She'd hoped they'd be able to travel and do some of the things they'd always planned, but it hadn't worked out that way. Roy had the time now, but their finances had been adversely affected when he'd had to take early retirement. Their income was less than it had been by at least twenty percent. In a money-saving effort, they'd moved from Seattle and across Puget Sound to the community of Cedar Cove. The cost of property was much more reasonable in Kitsap County, which also offered a slower pace of life. When the real estate agent showed them the house at 50 Harbor Street, with its wide front porch and sweeping view of the cove and lighthouse, Corrie knew immediately that this house and this town would become their home.

They'd moved from the big city, and it hadn't been as much of an adjustment as Corrie had feared. Folks in town were pleasant, and Roy and Corrie had made a few good friends -- notably the Beldons -- but kept mostly to themselves. They knew their neighbors' names and exchanged greetings, but that was about it.

To Corrie's disappointment, Roy had grown restless with retirement. His moods had reflected his boredom, and he was frequently cantankerous. Everything changed when he decided to rent office space and hang out his shingle as a private investigator. It was a decision Corrie had encouraged. Soon her husband was busy and looking forward to each day. He took on the cases that suited him and turned down those that didn't. Corrie was proud of Roy's skills, proud of his success and the way he cared about his clients. Never did it occur to her, or apparently to Roy, that one day he'd be solving his own mystery.

"You could be in danger," Corrie murmured, letting her anxiety show. She refused to hide her feelings, refused to pretend all was well when it wasn't.

Roy shrugged. "I doubt I'm in jeopardy. If anyone wanted to do me harm, they would've done so before now."

"How can you say that?" she asked irritably. "Bob was followed, and we both know it wasn't Bob they were interested in. He was driving your car. They thought they were following you."

Bob Beldon, together with his wife, Peggy, was the owner of the local Bed-and-Breakfast, Thyme and Tide. Bob had borrowed Roy's car and phoned in a near panic, sure he was being followed. Roy had advised him to drive immediately to the sheriff's office. As soon as Bob had pulled in to the station, the tail had left him. Only later did Roy and Corrie figure it out. Whoever had shadowed Bob had assumed it was Roy driving.

"The letter said we're in no danger," her husband reminded her.

"Of course! That's what they want us to think," Corrie argued. "Whoever's doing this wants us to lower our guard."

"Now, Corrie--"

She cut him off, rejecting any further attempts to pacify her. "That basket was delivered to our front porch. This . . . stranger walked right up to our home and left it, and now you're telling me we have nothing to worry about?" Her voice quavered, and she realized how close she was to losing control of her emotions. She was tired of being afraid, tired of waiting for the next message -- or worse. Tired of waking up with her eyes burning from lack of sleep. Her first conscious thought every morning was fear of what might happen that day.

"The basket came over a week ago, and we've heard nothing since." Roy said this as if this was supposed to comfort her. It didn't. "There was no postcard in the mail today, was there?" he asked, and she heard an unmistakable hint of tension in his voice.

"No." Corrie had collected the mail, flipped through it and tossed the bundle of bills and circulars on her desk. Roy nodded, as if to say Well, then?

"Roy," she said with deceptive calm, "I can't remember the last time I slept a night straight through. You're not sleeping well, either."

He didn't agree or disagree.

"We can't go on pretending everything's all right." Roy's handsome features tightened. "I'm doing everything I can," he told her curtly.

"I know, but it isn't enough."

"It has to be."

Corrie wasn't an expert in the area of investigations, but she knew when it was time to seek help, and they were well past that point. "You need to talk to somebody."

"Who?" he asked.

The only person she could suggest was the local sheriff. "Troy Davis . . ."

"Not a good idea," Roy said. "Whatever this is about happened long before we moved to Cedar Cove."

"How can you be so sure?"

"Regrets. Every postcard mentions regrets. There isn't a cop who doesn't have regrets -- about things we've done or haven't done or should've done differently."

She thought -- but didn't say -- that every human being had regrets. It wasn't restricted to cops.

"The last message said I JUST WANT YOU TO THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU DID. DON'T YOU HAVE A SINGLE REGRET? To me, that implies I did something -- arrested someone, testified against someone -- when I was a detective for Seattle."

Her voice fell to a whisper. "You were on the force a lot of years. Surely there's a case or two that stands out in your mind."

Roy shook his head. "Do you think I haven't thought about that? You've seen me read through my files and notes, going all the way back to my first year on the force, and there's nothing."

"I don't know . . . You haven't talked to me. You block me out."

"I'm protecting you."

"Don't!" she cried with barely controlled anger. "I need to know -- I have to know. Don't you see what this is doing to me?"

Roy leaned forward then, bracing his elbows against the desk. "I'm sorry," he whispered. "I've wracked my brain and I can't think of anyone who'd come after me like this."

"But there must be some case . . . One you might've forgotten."

Obviously at a loss, Roy shook his head again. "Clearly I have. I've put murderers away and received my share of threats over the years, but I can't think of anyone who'd do this. Yet who else could it be?" he said, almost to himself.

"What do you mean?" She was more in control now. Clutching a wadded tissue in her hand, she inhaled a calming breath.

"The type of people I dealt with weren't subtle. If they wanted revenge, they wouldn't bother with postcards."

"A relative of some criminal you sent to jail? Or . . . a victim?" That was a possibility she'd entertained more than once. He raised his shoulders in a slight shrug.

"Could be."

"What are we supposed to do now?" It was this constantly being on guard, not knowing what to expect, that had driven Corrie to such an emotional extreme.

"We do nothing."

"Nothing?" This wasn't what she wanted to hear. "How can we?"

"We have to, for now, until they make a mistake. That'll happen, sweetheart, I promise you, and once it does, this nightmare will be over."

"You promise?" she repeated.

Roy's expression softened and he nodded. Offering her further reassurance, he extended his arm across the desk. Corrie reached for his hand and laced her fingers through his. Her husband gazed deep into her eyes. She felt his love, his comfort, and for now it was enough. For today, for this morning at least, she would be fine. Her problem, Corrie decided, was that she was just so tired. Everything would seem less frightening if she could get even one decent night's sleep.

The front door to the office opened, and Roy abruptly released her and stood. From his years of police work he was always on the alert, never more so than now.

"Mom, Dad?" Their daughter's voice rang from the outer office where Corrie's desk was situated.

"Linnette," Corrie cried eagerly, although her enthusiasm might have seemed a little strained. "We're in here." Their daughter came into the room, then paused, an uncertain expression on her face. She was petite like Corrie, with dark hair and eyes. Also like Corrie, Linnette had excelled in school, and because she was the daughter of a policeman, she'd always been sheltered. Her studies had kept her from pursuing much of a social life, but Corrie hoped that would change now. Linnette had never had a serious boyfriend.

"I'm not interrupting anything, am I?" Linnette glanced suspiciously from Corrie to Roy and back again. "Is everything all right?"

"It's fine," Corrie assured her in a rush. "Why shouldn't it be?"

Their daughter was far too intuitive to be easily fooled, but thankfully she let it pass. "I've found an apartment," Linnette announced and did a small jig around the office.

"Where?" Corrie asked, hoping it was in town. Linnette had been hired by the new Cedar Cove Medical Clinic as a Physician's Assistant, and Corrie was thrilled to have her closer.

"It's on the cove, just down from the Waterfront Park," Linnette explained. "The complex next to the Holiday Inn Express."

Corrie knew the apartment building, since she passed it nearly every day when she went for her afternoon walk. The building was close to the marina and a short distance from the library. The two-story complex had a fabulous water view of the cove and lighthouse, with the Bremerton shipyard in the distance. As far as Corrie was concerned, this was perfect.

"I hope they aren't charging you an arm and a leg," Roy cautioned, but Corrie could tell he was pleased.

"The rent, compared to what I was paying in Seattle, is a bargain."


Roy was still protective of his little girl. Unfortunately, he had a difficult time expressing his feelings for his children -- especially their son. Mack and his father were constantly at odds. In Corrie's opinion, they were too much alike. Mack seemed to know exactly what to say to irritate Roy. And Roy wasn't blameless, either; he seemed to go out of his way to find fault with their son. Because of the tension between them, they generally avoided each other. Corrie didn't like it. Most of the time, she felt trapped in the middle. Thankfully that wasn't the case with Linnette, who was two years older than her brother.

Linnette was talking about the apartment and the move-in date and her job at the clinic. Corrie nodded at the appropriate moments but only listened with half an ear. Roy returned to his work while Corrie walked back to her desk, Linnette following her.

"Mom," Linnette said as soon as they were in the other room. She lowered her voice, and her face was thoughtful. Concerned. "Are you sure everything's all right between you and Dad?"

"Of course! What makes you ask?"

Her daughter hesitated. "Just now, when I came into the office, it looked like you were ready to cry, and Dad . . . he -- his eyes were so . . . hard. I've never seen him that intense. I didn't know what to think."

"You're imagining things," Corrie insisted.

"No, I'm not."

"It's nothing. We'll talk about it later." Her daughter could be obstinate, definitely a trait she'd inherited from Roy. The last person Corrie intended to share her worries with was Linnette. Eventually, perhaps, once this was all settled, they could laugh about it over lunch. But for now, these postcards were no laughing matter.

"You dropped a piece of mail," Linnette said, gesturing toward the desk.

Corrie froze. "I did?"

"Yes, there was a postcard on the floor when I came in. I put it on your desk."

Roy must have heard because he came out of the other office. His eyes met Corrie's. "Give it to me," he instructed. A small protest rose from her throat as she walked over to retrieve the card. Carefully she turned it over and read the message before handing it to Roy.


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50 Harbor Street (Cedar Cove Series #5) 4.1 out of 5 based on 2 ratings. 136 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
50 Harbor Street is the fifth book in the Cedar Cove series and it doesn't disappoint. There are some really unexpected surprises here and tje characters are well developed. I'm really enjoying this series; the characters are like people you might know.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoy Debbie's books very much. They are the kind of book that once you start to read you cannot put the book down. Very down to earth.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I recommend reading the series in order.There are many characters who a person becomes familiar with. Reading out of sequence can become confusing. Good book as it puts the characters in the present while having knowledge of their lives in the past.
TammyCTC More than 1 year ago
I love the series. It is easy to get wrapped up in the story and you have to keep reading to see what happens next.
Pure_Jonel 3 months ago
What a wonderful story! Macomber seamlessly tells the tales of the lives of those who live in Cedar Cove in such an unforgettable manner that I can’t stop thinking about it. She not only told a wonderful story, but was also engaged my emotions. I found myself trying to unravel certain parts of the story while also hoping for the best for others. All the while, Macomber brings this small town to life in such a manner that I felt as if I were actually there. I absolutely love bouncing around between all the characters’ lives. It gives the novel such a small town, homey feel. I finished the novel feeling as if I’d had a wonderful conversation with a close personal friend. This intimate method of character development really gave me insight into who everyone was, where they came from, and what they’re headed to. I appreciated the way that the various points of mystery passed one another. The way that everyone’s lives and troubles were so real and had me completely wrapped up in them. They completely captured my heart. Once again Macomber has painted the world with the wonders of small town life. Her characters captured my heart and invited me into their lives for a short while, also leaving an open invite for a return visit.
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JoyECS More than 1 year ago
Debbie's writing r4eminds me of our daily need to be in contact with God so we make the right decisions.
NurseGL More than 1 year ago
Loved it- such a great series of books- I keep getting them as they are excellent. Keep me on my toes and guessing what will happen next.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RRPNC More than 1 year ago
Loved this book and the series!!!  Recommend Very Highly!!
Sable0sa More than 1 year ago
I really enjoy the Cedar Cove series. I have already read the prior series and I am looking forward to the next one. I enjoy reading about several people's lives as it makes the story more interesting.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its keep me reading. I enjoyed this book
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momov2 More than 1 year ago
I have loved all the 1st 5 books in this series, I am now going crazy trying to find the 6th one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Debbie Macomber visits a small town in the Northwest of our country in her books centered around the towns people of Cedar Cove. Each story is an interesting tale of the lives and loves of the town Judge and her family and friends. Each is interesting and at times a little mystery is involved making them hard to put town. I recommend these books which give a great flavor of the Northwest to all.
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bboup More than 1 year ago
This is a very good read just like all of the other ones in this series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mama-Perro More than 1 year ago
Loved the entire Cedar Cove Series. Teaches the value of close knit family and its never too late to have it. The power of friendship. And the value of living in a small town community. Debbie Macomber books are also not full of smut, or juicy sex scenes so you are not embarrassed if your teen children see you reading it or asks to read it. She has a way with each book that if you pick up this book as the first book to explain who the characters are in the story so that you need not go out and purchase the previous four books. If you purchase them its because you want to know more but it is not necessary. I will buy more of her books as I have read many of them over the years and have always walked away very pleased. Mama-Perro