501 Italian Verbs

501 Italian Verbs

4.4 5
by John Colaneri
     
 


Here is a fine quick-reference source for language students, teachers, and translators. The 501 most commonly used Italian verbs are listed in table form, one verb per page, and conjugated in all tenses, identified by English infinitive forms. Verbs are both regular and irregular, and are presented alphabetically for easy reference. Added material related to verbs…  See more details below

Overview


Here is a fine quick-reference source for language students, teachers, and translators. The 501 most commonly used Italian verbs are listed in table form, one verb per page, and conjugated in all tenses, identified by English infinitive forms. Verbs are both regular and irregular, and are presented alphabetically for easy reference. Added material related to verbs and verb usage is also presented, including lists of hundreds more regular verbs, idiomatic verb usage, and more.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780764113482
Publisher:
Barron's Educational Series, Incorporated
Publication date:
02/28/2001
Series:
501 Verbs Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
576
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.12(d)

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

501 Italian Verbs [With CDROM] 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I highly recommend this book to anyone who has studied the Italian language and has an interest in it. I was a little bit disappointed when I read this book, though, because it is not nearly as detailed as '501 French Verbs' or '501 Spanish Verbs'. On the other hand, in order to conjugate, translate, and study Italian verbs effectively, this is the only book needed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the best book to buy it helped me greatly traslating.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been studying Italian for 2 years and rarely has this book left my immediate grasp. It's an excellent reference. I only wish that it were 1,000 verbs instead of 500.