58 Degrees North: The Mysterious Sinking of the Arctic Rose

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Overview

"In the spring of 2001, an industrial fishing trawler went down in the icy, forbidding waters just below the Arctic Circle. The Arctic Rose sunk so abruptly, in the middle of the night, that there was no time for the crew to put on survival suits or call for help. All fifteen men aboard were killed. To the baffled authorities, the cause of the sinking was a mystery. There were no witnesses, no clues, and the nearest vessel reported calm seas that night. The only thing known was the Arctic Rose's last position: 58 degrees north." "Journalist Hugo
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58 Degrees North: The Mysterious Sinking of the Arctic Rose

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Overview

"In the spring of 2001, an industrial fishing trawler went down in the icy, forbidding waters just below the Arctic Circle. The Arctic Rose sunk so abruptly, in the middle of the night, that there was no time for the crew to put on survival suits or call for help. All fifteen men aboard were killed. To the baffled authorities, the cause of the sinking was a mystery. There were no witnesses, no clues, and the nearest vessel reported calm seas that night. The only thing known was the Arctic Rose's last position: 58 degrees north." "Journalist Hugo Kugiya's investigation of this unprecedented disaster reveals how the modern fishing industry gave rise to these sailors' dangerous and strangely archaic life. Drawing upon interviews with family members and the crew's personal correspondence, Kugiya recreates the stories of the fifteen young men, of wildely different backgrounds, trapped in close quarters and able to call home or mail letters only in their occasional returns to port." While delving ever deeper into the lives of the crew, Kugiya also follows the Coast Guard's continuing inquiry, the most costly in history, as experts in weather, naval architecture, and wave formation, as well as salvage crews and rescue workers, all testify in an attempt to determine what really sank the Arctic Rose.
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Editorial Reviews

Hollywood Reporter
"Kugiya ably reconstructs events and characters, a crew fit for a World War II film, all facing a cruel sea."
Publishers Weekly
The subtitle of this Perfect Storm descendant is not entirely accurate: after an exhaustive search and rescue, the Coast Guard found no survivors (and only one body) among the 15 men aboard the Bering Sea trawler, but after an even more exhaustive investigation, they concluded that the probable cause was a combination of poor design, uncertain maintenance and too many inexperienced crewmen. Journalist Kugiya, who covered the 2001 tragedy for Newsday, occasionally aims at a kind of mythic drama (fishermen are "the last hunters, the last cowboys," the kind of men "who wear their own severed fingers around their necks as lucky charms"), but his account, while highly readable, can be a bit jumbled. Narratives of events such as the attempts to examine the wreck with remote-controlled cameras are interspersed with biographies of the crew and facts about the American fishing industry. Even some of the stronger subsections have weak spots, such as the capsule look at WWII in the Aleutians that's squeezed into a fine description of Dutch Harbor, the major Alaskan fishing port. But the portraits of the doomed fishermen-Capt. Dave Randall, Mexican immigrant Angel Mendez (seen mostly through the eyes of his widow), amiable drifter Eddie Haynes-grip and fascinate. The book isn't flawlessly executed, but it's bound to suck in maritime buffs. Agent, Sally Wofford-Girand. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
In spring 2001, the Arctic Rose disappeared in the Bering Sea, 700 miles from land. Fifteen fishermen died, and only one body was recovered in what was the worst American fishing disaster in 50 years-one that sparked the most expensive Coast Guard inquiry ever. Based on a series he did for Newsday (Long Island, NY), Kugiya's first book provides biographies of all 15 fishermen and the investigators while also probing the checkered history of the boat and the events surrounding the loss. Sympathetic to the difficulties that fishermen face but not sentimental, Kugiya puts a human face on an assortment of drifters, illegal aliens, and small businessmen, all hard-working men who turned to the sea for escape or a means to a new start. An intriguing look into one of the most dangerous occupations in America; recommended for subject collections and public libraries.-Edwin B. Burgess, U.S. Army Combined Arms Research Lib., Fort Leavenworth, KS Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
An eye-opening tale of a modern maritime disaster and its tortuous aftermath. Less showy-but less gripping, too-than Sebastian Junger's The Perfect Storm, Newsday correspondent Kugiya's account of the sinking of the Arctic Rose makes a sturdy companion. Like that of the Andrea Gail, the 15-man crew of the 100-foot-long Arctic Rose was a mixed lot: the assistant engineer was on the run from the law, the cook a decorated Vietnam vet, the first mate an adept student of the stock market. Most of the hands were young; some had survived drugs to become born-again Christians, others the Mexican desert to enter the US illegally. All were there to make anything but easy money; as Kugiya writes, fishermen in general are "the last hunters, the last cowboys, wage-earners walking the tightrope of waves and storms and freezing temperatures," 15 times more likely to die on the job than police officers or firefighters, and the Arctic Rose was working the particularly dangerous but fish-rich Bering Sea. In the early morning of April 2, 2001, working an area nearly off the sea charts, the Arctic Rose sank "abruptly and swiftly," and all aboard drowned. The Coast Guard soon launched an inquiry that would last two years and produce many hypotheses: for a time it was thought that the vessel, "built without blueprints by a Vietnamese fisherman on a rented piece of beachfront in Biloxi, Mississippi," had come apart in heavy seas, then that a suddenly developing low-pressure front might have sent high waves and winds crashing into the boat from several directions at once. The eventual explanation, it turns out, was not so dramatic, attributed to human error, and the board of inquiry made 31 recommendations meantto improve the safety of commercial fishing vessels. Those recommendations, however, were "just that, mere suggestions," and soon afterward the events of 9/11 would divert the Coast Guard's attention to port and coastal security. Solid investigative journalism, though of no comfort to anyone contemplating a tour aboard a factory ship.
Hollywood Reporter
"Kugiya ably reconstructs events and characters…a crew fit for a World War II film, all facing a cruel sea."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781582342863
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
  • Publication date: 4/11/2005
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 5.96 (w) x 10.08 (h) x 1.01 (d)

Meet the Author

Hugo Kugiya has worked as a journalist for fifteen years, reporting for the Orlando Sentinel, the Seattle Times, and Newsday, among others. His 2001 series on the sinking of the Arctic Rose won Newsday's Publisher's Award. He lives in Seattle with his daughter. This is his first book.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2012

    Kit

    Well anyway im waiting at the first result.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2012

    2888823658807732150933558876331assorted pery animals

    425365769808855232669895133670874254+797744255879 assported prey animals glisteningpelt style

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2012

    Rf

    GOOD! HE IS A TRAITOR AND A TERRIBLE CAT!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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