60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: San Francisco: Including Santa Rosa, Oakland, and San Jose
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60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: San Francisco: Including Santa Rosa, Oakland, and San Jose

by Jane Huber
     
 


Bay Area parks and preserves offer a dramatic variety of landscapes, from fern-lined canyons to rugged beaches, grassy meadows to sunny chaparral-coated hillsides. Well-known destinations such as Point Reyes National Seashore, Mount Diablo State Park, Mount Tamalpais State Park, and many other more obscure jewels of the Bay Area park system are just a short drive…  See more details below

Overview


Bay Area parks and preserves offer a dramatic variety of landscapes, from fern-lined canyons to rugged beaches, grassy meadows to sunny chaparral-coated hillsides. Well-known destinations such as Point Reyes National Seashore, Mount Diablo State Park, Mount Tamalpais State Park, and many other more obscure jewels of the Bay Area park system are just a short drive from the heart of San Francisco. Completely updated and including five new hikes, 60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: San Francisco guides readers to a splendid assortment of trails in the Bay Area's nine counties (a population of over 6 million people). Expertly drawn trail maps and trail profiles complement the detailed trail descriptions and useful at-a-glance information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780897329729
Publisher:
Menasha Ridge Press
Publication date:
02/28/2007
Series:
60 Hikes within 60 Miles
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
279
Product dimensions:
6.24(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.74(d)

Read an Excerpt

Mt. Tamalpais: Phoenix lake

This northwestern flank of Mount Tam is Marin Municipal Water District land, preserved for the primary purpose of providing domestic water supply to Marin County. The hiker's benefit is a network of many trails and fire roads that connect to Mount Tamalpais State Park and a few small Marin County Open Space District preserves. I've loved this hike from my first visit, and it's a particularly good choice for late winter and spring, when wildflowers bloom everywhere.

From the parking lot, begin walking uphill on a broad fire road. This trail provides access to many destinations farther up the mountain and is heavily used by cyclists and runners. At an easy grade, the trail ascends through a mixed woodland of madrone, coast live oak, buckeye, California bay, and one unpopular non-native plant called broom. Early spring flowers include California buttercups, milkmaids, and Welsh onion (another non-native). In winter months, the water rushing downhill from Phoenix Lake is a melodious accompaniment. The fire road passes the spillway and crests at 0.3 miles. Another fire road heads off to the left; this is the return route for the hike, so continue straight. After one last little hill, the fire road levels out. On the left, Phoenix Lake stretches its arms into the creases of a wooded canyon. Mature buckeye, black oak, coast live oak, and California bay provide partial shade but still permit views to the lake. The Worn Springs Fire Road departs from a small cluster of redwood on the right at 0.4 miles, offering a steep route to Bald Hill. Continue on the tour around Phoenix Lake to the next junction, at 0.6 miles, then turn right onto the Yolanda Trail.This diminutive trail begins to climb at a moderate grade along a creekbed, through madrone, black oak, coast live oak, and California bay. Wildflowers emerge in these woods as early as January, when you might see hound's tongue, milkmaids, and shooting stars. In early spring, bluedicks, buttercups, and irises are common. Yolanda crosses the creek and winds uphill into a more grassy area, somewhat overgrown with a young forest of broom. On a morning hike here I got a little wake-up jolt when a jackrabbit came barreling down the trail toward me.

Meet the Author

A native of rural New Jersey, Jane Huber lived in Boston and New York City before moving to San Francisco in 1991. Once she got over the shock of driving a stick shift pickup truck up and down San Francisco's steep streets, Huber began venturing out of the city to explore Bay Area parks and preserves. Seeking to share her hiking experiences with others, Huber created the Bay Area Hiker website in 1999. She and her husband live in a San Francisco neighborhood populated with hawks and hummingbirds, where views stretch to Mount Diablo and Mount Tamalpais.

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