60 Second Self-Starter: Sixty Solid Techniques to get motivated, get organized, and get going in the workplace.

60 Second Self-Starter: Sixty Solid Techniques to get motivated, get organized, and get going in the workplace.

4.9 13
by Jeff Davidson
     
 

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  • Does your desk look the scene of an explosion?
  • Is your computer crowded with pointless files?
  • Are the tools you need always buried under piles of junk?

If so, Jeff Davidson has the solutions for you. With sixty simple, immediate techniques, he shows you how to get your workplace organized, streamline your workday, and

…  See more details below

Overview

  • Does your desk look the scene of an explosion?
  • Is your computer crowded with pointless files?
  • Are the tools you need always buried under piles of junk?

If so, Jeff Davidson has the solutions for you. With sixty simple, immediate techniques, he shows you how to get your workplace organized, streamline your workday, and boost your productivity and job satisfaction. With this handy manual by your side, you can banish chaos from your cubicle forever!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Jeff Davidson approaches organizing as an exercise in control, efficiency, and peace of mind. Jeff can tell it like it is, because he is like he tells it." --Warren Farrell, Ph.D., author of Why Men Are the Way They Are and Women Can't Hear What Men Don't Say

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781598698435
Publisher:
Adams Media
Publication date:
06/01/2008
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.10(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Jeff Davidson is the author of numerous books, including The 60 Second Self-Starter and The Complete Idiot's Guide to Managing Your Time, as well as the audiobook The Power of Simplicity. Davidson, a resident of Chapel Hill, NC, is also a noted professional speaker. Visit his Web site at www.BreathingSpace.com.

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60 Second Self-Starter: Sixty Solid Techniques to get motivated, get organized, and get going in the workplace. 4.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the vital things I learned about becoming more accomplished, getting things done, and overcoming procrastination is that procrastination is something that everybody grapples with even if it isn’t evident. In the workplace, there are super stars who seem to just walk on water and you think “Well, he has no problem with procrastination or she never lets road blocks get in her way.” If you were to look further, you would find that even the high-achievers are constantly battling their own procrastination. Knowing that everyone faces the same types of mental and emotional huddles here and there when it comes to getting started on projects in itself is a breakthrough concept for me. That means I simply have to know what the most accomplished people among us do to get past these obstacles and on the path to great accomplishment. This book spells out what you can do to get on that path. In chapter after chapter, and they are very short chapters, you gain a variety of insights and ideas and more specifically action steps that bring you from, “Can’t get started,” to the job is all done. The author seems to have anticipated all the mind games we play with ourselves when we want to avoid having to take action, and helps get us past those mind games onto firmer ground. I wish I encountered this book years ago, but I am happy that I encountered it now.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I don’t know if this is the best book on overcoming procrastination, but it is certainly effective. it does not contain a lot of excess verbiage. The author goes right to the heart of the matter and lays out in everyday language what you can do to get started on whatever assignment you’re facing right now. What’s more, it even has tips for what to do when you know you’re still going to doddle before tackling the big one. In such cases, he advises tackling other smaller but necessary tasks so that once you’re able to actually get to the big one, you at least have gotten other important things out of the way. This is far superior than destructive doddling, which involves not tackling the big one, not tackling the smaller tasks, and then finding yourself having really accomplished nothing.
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