7 Greeks

7 Greeks

5.0 1
by Guy Davenport
     
 

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"Overall, this volume will afford great pleasure to scholars, teachers, and also those who simply love to watch delightful souls disport themselves in language."—Anne Carson
Here is a colorful variety pf works by seven Greek poets and philosophers who lived from the eighth to the third centuries BC. Salvaged from shattered pottery vases and tattered scrolls

Overview

"Overall, this volume will afford great pleasure to scholars, teachers, and also those who simply love to watch delightful souls disport themselves in language."—Anne Carson
Here is a colorful variety pf works by seven Greek poets and philosophers who lived from the eighth to the third centuries BC. Salvaged from shattered pottery vases and tattered scrolls of papyrus, everything decipherable from the remains of these ancient authors is assembled here. From early to later, the collection contains: Archilochos; Sappho; Alkman; Anakreon; the philosophers Herakleitos and Diogenes; and Herondas. This composite of fragments translated by Guy Davenport is the most complete collection of its kind ever to appear in one volume.

Editorial Reviews

John Frederick Nims
“Davenports' Pleiad of Greeks—four poets, two philosophers, and a less familiar composer of rakish mimes—provides a vivid insight into the heart and mind of a Greece still rising, in the brilliant of these poets, to its Periclean apogee.”
D. S. Carne-Ross
“If you don't read Greek, read Davenport; if you do, read Davenport and learn to read Greek better.”
Willis Barnstone
“Davenport has made us again discover that the Greeks, who gave us most of our culture, are our most lively, poignant, humorous, and profound writers whom we should read today as contemporaries....His exciting original versions are appropriately an immediate modern classic.”
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Taken from mummy wrappings and other relics, these are found poems of the most literal sort-all the words that remain from a gang of seven who lived between the 7th and 3rd century B.C.: Sappho, Archilochos, Herakleitos, et al. Davenport, fiction writer (Table of Green Fields) and essayist (Geography of the Imagination) as well as translator, has constructed an exhaustive scholarly anthology, sometimes offering multiple translations of a piece. About half of the selections read as though complete, or possibly so; the rest is made up of scraps of words whose context was lost in the parchment that dissolved around them. Reading these fragments is like moving through an art museum where just the titles remain ("Sparks in wheat'') or, thanks to the author's accessible vernacular and the randy spirits of our ancients, browsing in the local video mart ("Butt kisser!''). Diogenes serves up aphorisms and witticisms that crack on Plato; lengthier segments sing of wars, gods and virgins. Readers are left wanting for that which has turned to dust. (June)
Booknews
A variety of works by seven Greek poets and philosophers who lived from the eighth to the third centuries B.C., elegantly translated by Davenport, who also provides the introduction. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780811212885
Publisher:
New Directions Publishing Corporation
Publication date:
06/28/1995
Pages:
241
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

As Bruce Bawer wrote in Bookforum, "the late Guy Davenport (1927-2005) left behind an oeuvre that is one long lesson in the history of civilization, and to read any part of it—story, essay, or translation—is to be enthralled by his unflagging intellectual energy and engagement." His books include The Geography of the Imagination, The Death of Picasso, Herakleitos and Diogenes, A Table of Green Fields, The Cardiff Team, DaVinci's Bicycle, and many more.

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7 Greeks 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It must be difficult, for those of us who do not understand Greek, to get a real idea of what it means to read and understand the poetry of ancient Greece. Most translations tell us more about the imagination of the translator that any reality which can be transported from older times. Happily, Davenport has done much to bring the Greeks to us in all their quick, intelligent grace. For either the serious student or the armchair appreciator of the ancient world, this book is a must.