The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change

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Overview

In The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, author Stephen R. Covey presents a holistic, integrated, principle-centered approach for solving personal and professional problems. With penetrating insights and pointed anecdotes, Covey reveals a step-by-step pathway for living with fairness, integrity, honesty, and human dignity -- principles that give us the security to adapt to change and the wisdom and power to take advantage of the opportunities that change creates. ...
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Overview

In The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, author Stephen R. Covey presents a holistic, integrated, principle-centered approach for solving personal and professional problems. With penetrating insights and pointed anecdotes, Covey reveals a step-by-step pathway for living with fairness, integrity, honesty, and human dignity -- principles that give us the security to adapt to change and the wisdom and power to take advantage of the opportunities that change creates.


With a balance of theory and practical examples, this guide to personal and professional life describes seven principles of life management. Targeted toward anyone who is interested in personal change, it guides you through private victory, public victory and renewal.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Despite having sold many millions of copies, Stephen Covey's groundbreaking book remains as fresh, helpful, and important as when it was first published. Such longevity is a testament to the quality of the insights that Covey offers: Eschewing easy fixes and simple-minded formulas, his writings offers a comprehensive and highly detailed program for invigorating your career as well as other aspects of life. You won't be able to breeze through this book (the writing is sometimes complex and involved), and you won't be able to apply Covey's ideas half-heartedly (the vision outlined requires serious effort to realize), but if you're willing to do the work, you'll reap the enormous benefits that many other readers have discovered and put into action.
From the Publisher
The late Skip LeFauve President, Saturn Corporation/General Motors Stephen Covey's The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People played a major role in the development of Saturn's operating systems and philosophy. Our commitment to quality and to our customers has its roots in The 7 Habits.

Ken M. Radziwanowski AT&T School of Business Picture someone going through the best experience they've ever had in terms of training — that's what they say. People credit the 7 Habits with changing their lives, with getting back on track personally and professionally.

Library Journal
While Covey's book is perhaps not as explicitly spiritual as some self-help titles, his emphasis on character and values reveals his Church of Latter-day Saints background very powerfully; interested readers may want to go on to his 8th Habit or The Leader in Me.
Daniel Pink
“Every so often a book comes along that not only alters the lives of readers but leaves an imprint on the culture itself. The 7 Habits is one of those books.”
author of On Becoming a Leader and Still Surprised - Warren Bennis
“Covey’s masterpiece, if it hasn’t changed the world, has influenced millions of readers who can and will make our planet more peaceful and prosperous and prepared and purposeful.”
Maya Angelou
“Happily, this book has advised and encouraged us for 25 years. Now, I encourage us to be loyal and supportive for another 25 years.”
New York times bestselling author of Delivering Happiness and CEO of Zappos.com, Inc. - Tony Hsieh
The 7 Habits encompasses timeless principles that can help guide any company toward success.”
Meg Whitman
The 7 Habits has guided many of us on our journey through the world of business. Simple but incredibly effective. A great guide for any aspiring leader!”
Jim Collins
“No person lasts forever, but books and ideas can endure. Stephen R. Covey’s life is done, but his work is not. It continues, right here in this book as alive today as when first written.”
Arianna Huffington
“Twenty-five years after it first appeared, the wisdom of The 7 Habits is more relevant than ever. On an individual level, people are burning out, and on a collective level we are burning up the planet. So Dr. Covey’s emphasis on self-renewal and his understanding that leadership and creativity require us to tap into our own physical, mental, and spiritual resources are exactly what we need now.”
author of Unlimited Power and Awaken the Giant Within - Anthony Robbins
“Fundamentals are the key to success. Stephen Covey is a master of them. Buy his book, but most important, use it!”
Indra Nooyi
“As the seminal work of Stephen R. Covey, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People has influenced millions around the world to be their best selves at work and at home. It stands the test of time as one of the most important books of our time.”
author of The Key is Love: My Mother’s Wisdom, A Daughter’s Gratitude - Marie Osmond
“With all the responsibilities and demands of time, travel, work, and families placed upon us in today’s competitive world, it’s a pig plus to have Stephen Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People to refer to.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743269513
  • Publisher: Free Press
  • Publication date: 11/9/2004
  • Edition description: Updated
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 68,601
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.43 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Stephen R. Covey

Stephen R. Covey is an internationally respected leadership authority, family expert, teacher, organizational consultant, founder of the former Covey Leadership Center, and cochairman of Franklin Covey Co. He has made teaching Principle-Centered Living and Principle-Centered Leadership his life's work. He holds an M.B.A. from Harvard and a doctorate from Brigham Young University, where he was a professor of organizational behavior and business management and also served as director of university relations and assistant to the president. For more than thirty years he has taught millions of individuals, families, and leaders in business, education, and government the transforming power of principles or natural laws that govern human and organizational effectiveness.

Dr. Covey is the author of several acclaimed books, including The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, which has been at the top of the bestseller lists for over seven years and tied as the #1 Most Influential Business Book of the Twentieth Century in a survey of Chief Executive Magazine's readers. More than ten million copies have been sold in twenty-eight languages and seventy countries. His books Principle-Centered Leadership and First Things First are two of the bestselling business books of the decade.

Dr. Covey and other Franklin Covey authors, speakers, and spokespersons, all authorities on leadership and effectiveness, are consistently sought by radio and television stations, magazines, and newspapers throughout the world.

Among recent acknowledgments, Dr. Covey has received the Thomas More College Medallion for continuing service to humanity, the Toastmasters'International Top Speaker Award, Inc. magazine's National Entrepreneur of the Year Lifetime Achievement Award for Entrepreneurial Leadership, and several honorary doctorates. He has also been recognized as one of Time magazine's twenty-five most influential Americans.

Stephen, his wife, Sandra, and their family live in the Rocky Mountains of Utah.

Biography

Stephen R. Covey writes in his blockbuster self-improvement tome, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, about the "social band-aid" effect of much recent success literature, the tendency to create personality-based solutions to problems that go deeper. "Success became more a function of personality, of public image, of attitudes and behaviors, skills and techniques, that lubricate the processes of human interaction," he wrote. Covey acknowledges the importance of the "personality ethic," but he sought to go deeper and emphasize the "character ethic," something Covey saw as a fading concept. He went back further and found inspiration in figures such as Benjamin Franklin, Thoreau, and Emerson.

Indeed, everything old is new again in Covey's works. The author himself would admit that nothing he is saying is terribly new; but Covey's synthesis of years and years of thinking about effectiveness resulted in a smash personal growth title -- one that continues to be a top seller nearly 15 years after its first publication. The title, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, makes it sounds like a quick-fix path to power, but Covey's philosophy is rooted in exactly the opposite notion: There are no quick fixes, no shortcuts. He is writing about habits, after all, which can be as tough to institute as they can be to break. His list: Be proactive; begin with the end in mind; put first things first; think win-win; seek first to understand, then to be understood; synergize; sharpen the saw.

Covey's subsequent titles are based in some way or another on this seminal book. First Things First offers a time-management strategy and a new way of looking at priorities. Principle-Centered Leadership is an examination of character traits and an "inside-out" way of improving organizational leadership. Covey, a Mormon, also wrote two religious contemplations of human effectiveness and interaction, The Spiritual Roots of Human Relations and The Divine Center. These were Covey's first two titles; his esteem for spirituality is not absent from subsequent work but appears as just one more tool that can be applied in self-improvement.

Like Spencer Johnson's Who Moved My Cheese?, 7 Habits has been able to achieve astonishing sales success by espousing ideas applicable beyond an office setting. Covey's books are about self-improvement more than they are about corporate management, which has enabled him to create a successful version of the philosophy for families (entitled, of course, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Families) in addition to attracting people who just want to be more efficient in their lives, or bolster that diet.

Most attractive about Covey is his versatility in conveying his ideas. His books are structured in appealing, number-oriented groupings ("Three Resolutions," "Thirty Methods of Influence," four quadrants of importance in time management) and big umbrellas of ideas, but within these pockets Covey draws from a wide range of resources: anecdotes, business school exercises, historical wisdom, and diverse metaphors. Sometimes, Covey uses himself as an example. He knows as well as anyone that practicing what he preaches is tough; but he keeps trying, which makes him an inspiring testimonial for his own books.

Good To Know

Covey is married to Sandra Merrill Covey. They have nine children.

Covey is co-chair of FranklinCovey, a management resources firm based in Provo, Utah. He has also been a business professor at Brigham Young University, where he earned his doctorate.

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People has sold more than 12 million copies in 33 languages and 75 countries throughout the world.

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    1. Hometown:
      Provo, Utah
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 24, 1932
    2. Place of Birth:
      Salt Lake City, Utah
    1. Date of Death:
      July 16, 2012
    2. Place of Death:
      Idaho Falls, ID

Read an Excerpt


Habit 4: Think Win/Win

...When a boss becomes the first assistant to each of his subordinates, he can greatly increase his span of control. Entire levels of administration and overhead can be eliminated. Instead of supervising six or eight, such a manager can supervise twenty, thirty, fifty, or more.

In Win/Win performance agreements, consequences become the natural or logical result of performance rather than a reward or punishment arbitrarily handed out by the person in charge.

There are basically four kinds of consequences (rewards and penalties) that management or parents can control-financial, psychic, opportunity, and responsibility. Financial consequences include such things as income, stock options, allowances, or penalties. Psychic or psychological consequences include recognition, approval, respect, credibility, or the loss of them. Unless people are in a survival mode, psychic compensation is often more motivating than financial compensation. Opportunity includes training, development, perks, and other benefits. Responsibility has to do with scope and authority, either of which can be enlarged or diminished. Win/Win agreements specify consequences in one or more of those areas and the people involved know it up front. So you don't play games. Everything is clear from the beginning.

In addition to these logical, personal consequences, it is also important to clearly identify what the natural organizational consequences are. For example, what will happen if I'm late to work, if I refuse to cooperate with others, if I don't develop good Win/Win performance agreements with my subordinates, if I don't hold them accountable for desired results, or if I don't promote their professional growth and career development?

When my daughter turned 16, we set up a Win/Win agreement regarding use of the family car. We agreed that she would obey the laws of the land and that she would keep the car clean and properly maintained. We agreed that she would use the car only for responsible purposes and would serve as a cab driver for her mother and me within reason. And we also agreed that she would do all her other jobs cheerfully without being reminded. These were our wins.

We also agreed that I would provide some resources-the car, gas, and insurance. And we agreed that she would meet weekly with me, usually on Sunday afternoon, to evaluate how she was doing based on our agreement. The consequences were clear. As long as she kept her part of the agreement, she could use the car. If she didn't keep it, she would lose the privilege until she decided to.

This Win/Win agreement set up clear expectations from the beginning on both our parts. It was a win for her-she got to use the car-and it was certainly a win for Sandra and me. Now she could handle her own transportation needs and even some of ours' We didn't have to worry about maintaining the car or keeping it clean. And we had a built-in accountability, which meant I didn't have to hover over her or manage her methods. Her integrity, her conscience, her power of discernment and our high Emotional Bank Account managed her infinitely better. We didn't have to get emotionally strung out, trying to supervise her every move and coming up with punishments or rewards on the spot if she didn't do things the way we thought she should. We had a Win/Win agreement, and it liberated us all.

Win/Win agreements are tremendously liberating. But as the product of isolated techniques, they won't hold up. Even if you set them up in the beginning, there is no way to maintain them without personal integrity and a relationship of trust.

A true Win/Win agreement is the product of the paradigm, the character, and the relationships out of which it grows. In that context, it defines and directs the interdependent interaction for which it was created.

Systems

Win/Win can only survive in an organization when the systems support it. If you talk Win/Win but reward Win/Lose, you've got a losing program on your hands.

You basically get what you reward. If you want to achieve the goals and reflect the values in your mission statement, then you need to align the reward system with these goals and values. If it isn't aligned systemically, you won't be walking your talk. You'll be in the situation of the manager I mentioned earlier who talked cooperation but practiced competition by creating a "Race to Bermuda" contest.

I worked for several years with a very large real estate organization in the Middle West. My first experience with this organization was at a large sales rally where over 800 sales associates gathered for the annual reward program. It was a psych-up cheerleading session, complete with high school bands and a great deal of frenzied screaming.

Out of the 800 people there, around forty received awards for top performance, such as "Most Sales," "Greatest Volume," "Highest Earned Commissions," and "Most Listings." There was a lot of hoopla-excitement, cheering, applause-around the presentation of these awards. There was no doubt that those forty people had won; but there was also the underlying awareness that 760 people had lost.

We immediately began educational and organizational development work to align the systems and structures of the organization toward the Win/Win paradigm. We involved people at a grass roots level to develop the kinds of systems that would motivate them. We also encouraged them to cooperate and synergize with each other so that as many as possible could achieve the desired results of their individually tailored performance agreements.

At the next rally one year later, there were over 1,000 sales associates present, and about 800 of them received awards. There were a few individual winners based on comparisons, but the program primarily focused on people achieving self-selected performance objectives and on groups achieving team objectives. There was no need to bring in the high school bands to artificially contrive the fanfare, the cheerleading, and the psych up. There was tremendous natural interest and excitement because people could share in each other's happiness, and teams of sales associates could experience rewards together, including a vacation trip for the entire office.

The remarkable thing was that almost all of the 800 who received the awards that year had produced as much per person in terms of volume and profit as the previous year's forty. The spirit of Win/Win had significantly increased the number of golden eggs and had fed the goose as well, releasing enormous human energy and talent. The resulting synergy was astounding to almost everyone involved....

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Table of Contents

PART ONE: PARADIGMS AND PRINCIPLES    13
PART Two: PRIVATE VICTORY    63
HABIT 1 Be Proactive    65
HABIT 2 Begin with the End in Mind    95
HABIT 3 Put First Things First    145
PART THREE: PUBLIC VICTORY    183
HABIT 4 Think Win/Win    204
HABIT 5 Seek First to Understand, Then to Be
HABIT 6 Synergize    261
PAT FOUR: RENEWAL    285
HABIT 7 Sharpen the Saw    287
APPENDIX A: Possible Perceptions Flowing out of Various
APPENDIX B: A Quadrant II Day at the Office    331
PROBLEM/OPPoRTUNITY INDEX    341
INDEX    348
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 190 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(114)

4 Star

(39)

3 Star

(20)

2 Star

(7)

1 Star

(10)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 190 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 10, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Effective Habits = Effective Individual

    I came across this book after seeing an endorsement from Covey on another great book, Emotional Intelligence 2.0. I loved it. Covey taps into some fundamental aspects of human nature and, despite being 20 years old, the ideas are fresh and compelling. Covey offers easy fixes and straightforward formulas backed by an incredibly detailed program for boosting your career and efficacy. It's dense and Covey is long-winded, but the wisdom provided is worth the effort. Each chapter is dedicated to one of the habits, with the first half of the book focused on moving from dependence to independence (i.e. self mastery) and the last half focused on interdependence (working with others): * Habit 1: Be Proactive Take initiative in life by realizing your decisions (and how they align with life's principles) are the primary determining factor for effectiveness in your life. Taking responsibility for your choices and the subsequent consequences that follow. * Habit 2: Begin with the End in Mind Self-discover and clarify your deeply important character values and life goals. Envisioning the ideal characteristics for each of your various roles and relationships in life. * Habit 3: Put First Things First Planning, prioritizing, and executing your week's tasks based on importance rather than urgency. Evaluating if your efforts exemplify your desired character values, propel you towards goals, and enrich the roles and relationships elaborated in Habit 2. * Habit 4: Think Win-Win Genuinely striving for mutually beneficial solutions or agreements in your relationships. Valuing and respecting people by understanding a "win" for all is ultimately a better long-term resolution than if only one person in the situation had gotten his way. * Habit 5: Seek First to Understand, then to be Understood Using empathetic listening to be genuinely influenced by a person, which compels them to reciprocate the listening, take an open mind to being influenced by you, which creates an atmosphere of caring, respect, and positive problem solving. * Habit 6: Synergize Combining the strengths of people through positive teamwork, so as to achieve goals no one person could have done alone. How to yield the most prolific performance out of a group of people through encouraging meaningful contribution, and modeling inspirational and supportive leadership. * Habit 7: Sharpen the Saw The balancing and renewal of your resources, energy, and health to create a sustainable long-term effective lifestyle.

    39 out of 39 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Not an E-Z read

    For a personal change book, I found it rather a hard read. The book to me is, well, complicated. The seven habits make sense and all, but the whole process seems to involve making layers of change, with each layer being a whole book in itself. Not a very quick read, and I'm not saying its not worthwhile and all, it's more a book that you have to be willing to work with. Readers who like less sophisticated personal change books might enjoy The Sixty-Second Motivator.

    10 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 27, 2010

    Good but not great

    If you regularly already read these types of self-improvement books and have had leadership experience, this isn't going to profoundly change your life. It will most likely just reaffirm your current habits and serve as a reminder. Still, I enjoyed listening to his CDs.

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 13, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Fresh, helpful, and important

    Despite having sold many millions of copies, Stephen Covey's groundbreaking book remains as fresh, helpful, and important as when it was first published. Such longevity is a testament to the quality of the insights that Covey offers: Eschewing easy fixes and simple-minded formulas, his writings offers a comprehensive and highly detailed program for invigorating your career as well as other aspects of life.<BR/><BR/>You won't be able to breeze through this book (the writing is sometimes complex and involved), and you won't be able to apply Covey's ideas half-heartedly (the vision outlined requires serious effort to realize), but if you're willing to do the work, you'll reap the enormous benefits that many other readers have discovered and put into action.<BR/><BR/>Covey gave a glowing endorsement for another book that I strongly recommend because it's outstanding and it has helped me a ton: <BR/>"The Emotional Intelligence Quick Book"

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 17, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Best book ever!!!

    One EVERYONE should read. Preferrably as soon as their old enough to comprehend it--teenager possibly. Helps you evaluate your goals & priorities in life and determine what kind of person you want to be and how to be successful. Excellent!!! I'm now reading 7 Habits of Highly Effective Families by Steven Covey.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 8, 2010

    Great, as expected!

    I wanted a audio book that would motivate and encourage me and this did just that! I would recommend it to any person who either needs a kickstart or a boost!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 11, 2009

    lot of good stuff..

    Very good info. Wish I had purchased this book when it was first published.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 9, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Personal Change

    This book is a great read to keep on track and effectively work through professional and personal challenges. Brett Vanderwater, MBA, CIA, CMA, CTP

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2009

    Great Book!!

    Good info to know and learn from.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 7, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    User Manual For Life

    This book offers a way of thinking and acting without taking a political or religious stance. It is well researched and the author gives excellent examples from his own life.

    A great gift for graduates but read it yourself first.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2007

    A reviewer

    Not that I'm an expert on the subject, but I'm guessing that this isn't your typical success book. In many ways it's a general purpose psychology book, dealing with such things as motivation, organizational skills, and how to deal with stress. It's chock full of seemingly unique information, and interesting quotes and tidbits. For example, it states 'Management is efficiency in climbing the ladder of success. Leadership determines whether the ladder is leaning against the right wall.' The book isn't boring or repetitive, and is written in a pleasing, conversational manner. Everyone should give this a read, not just those interested in business success.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2008

    Logical path for success

    This book is well put together. The reader begins with habit 1 - taking personal responsibility and moves from personal management to interpersonal management. The information is logical, memorable and wonderful, but in truth, it is hard to change habits. I recommend this book if you are ready to make the changes to acquire habits that lead to life success. Another wonderful book I recommend for personal and career success is Optimal Thinking - How To Be Your Best Self.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2014

      I found The 7 Habits of Highly Effective people to be not only

      I found The 7 Habits of Highly Effective people to be not only incredible, but inspiring, too.  It focused on how to better yourself, in your own personal views, and in working with others.  The chapters are set up so that there is a chapter for each habit.  The first half of the habits focus on independence, and how to be your own person.  They tell you how to shift your views, and how to focus on goals and ideas.  The second half is centered around working better with others.  It talks about how to synergize with others, and promote cooperation.  The ideas are then nicely tied together at the end of the book.  I suggest this book for all people young adult, and older.  It is a difficult read, and seems to focus more on that age group, making it not the best for younger reader.  I enjoyed the book, but it seems that most people of my age group would not.  However if it is something you enjoy, I think it is very important think to have read at some point in your life.  As I said earlier the book is a bit difficult to read, but nothing above high school level.  It is written very well, and is very true in it's meaning.  The 7 Habits of Highly effective people is an amazing book that everyone should read, so they can better their personal and work lives.           -GWG

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 18, 2010

    Very Highly Recommend

    Mr. Covey challenges the very way we think on every level with the concepts presented in this book. I am truly happy that I have read this book and I have began implementing these concepts in my daily walk and I can see immense change not only in my perceptions, but also in peoples perceptions of me. I recommend this book for all people.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 13, 2010

    Always useful

    This book helps you realize personal change, which leads to interpersonal change. It's an "inside-out" technique that everyone should read to better themselves and be a more effective leader.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 6, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A few good points; not much else

    I finally read it. What do I mean by that? I've had this book for about 15 years. I believe it was a complimentary copy when I purchased a Franklin planner, among other things, from Franklin Covey. I've started it numerous times, but never made it more than a few pages in. I finally finished it and do not understand what all the hype is about. Let me state that I do believe the 7 habits are worth following in and of themselves. Habits one, two and three alone (private victory) have some excellent perspective and are worth implementing. Habits 4, 5 and 6, are important, but I did not like the way Mr. Covey conveyed the information. Habit 7 (sharpen the saw) ties it all together. The biggest issue I had with this book is the writing. I cannot stand the way Stephen Covey writes. I felt like everything was being preached to me. I did not like the hundreds of stories that he continuously tells (some I even question if they are true).

    I should note that I've been a fan of the Franklin Planner system going back many years. I personally think Mr. Covey drove them into the ground with the merger and the Franklin Covey system (note that I didn't say Franklin Planner ) just does not work. They missed the boat with the technological age. Maybe that would not have happened if Covey spent more time developing something that works instead of preaching these works. It's products have continually gotten worse. The values noted in this book have importance in the bigger picture, but for day-to-day use, I prefer Getting Things Done by David Allen. I may give First Things First a read since that chapter proved the most useful to me. Doing that, however, would mean suffering through Mr. Covey's reading style again. Having said all of that, I do feel a sense of accomplishment. However, that is only because I finished a book on my shelf that had been there for so many years.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2009

    Great Help

    great companion when reading the book

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2009

    Great Surprise!

    This was required reading for school. I was thinking it was going to be boring. It was far from boring. I learned so many things and have suggested it to many people. Absolutely worth it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 27, 2009

    Classic

    Very theoretical and hands on. Deals with mental toughness, but not emotional toughness-and for this I would recommend Full Throttle by Dr. Gregg Steinberg

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    This is a good book with useful information. Recommended for others to read.

    This is a good book with useful information.<BR/>Recommended for others to read.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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