97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement

97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement

3.3 30
by Jane Ziegelman
     
 

ISBN-10: 0061288500

ISBN-13: 9780061288500

Pub. Date: 06/01/2010

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

In 97 Orchard, Jane Ziegelman explores the culinary life that was the heart and soul of New York's Lower East Side around the turn of the twentieth century—a city within a city, where Germans, Irish, Italians, and Eastern European Jews attempted to forge a new life. Through the experiences of five families, all of them residents of 97 Orchard Street,

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Overview

In 97 Orchard, Jane Ziegelman explores the culinary life that was the heart and soul of New York's Lower East Side around the turn of the twentieth century—a city within a city, where Germans, Irish, Italians, and Eastern European Jews attempted to forge a new life. Through the experiences of five families, all of them residents of 97 Orchard Street, Ziegelman takes readers on a vivid and unforgettable tour, from impossibly cramped tenement apartments, down dimly lit stairwells, beyond the front stoops where housewives congregated, and out into the hubbub of the dirty, teeming streets. Ziegelman shows how immigrant cooks brought their ingenuity to the daily task of feeding their families, preserving traditions from home but always ready to improvise. 97 Orchard lays bare the roots of our collective culinary heritage.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061288500
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
06/01/2010
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
349,090
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Introduction

One The Glockner Family 1

Two The Moore Family 47

Three The Gumpertz Family 83

Four The Rogarshevsky Family 125

Five The Baldizzi Family 183

Notes 229

Bibliography 235

Photo Credits 239

Index 241

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97 Orchard 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
this book is fascinating. It shared many insights into life in the tenements on New York in the late 19th and early 20th centuries most especially about foodways of the immigants
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very informative book on the history of food of the many immigrants who migrated to New York. One could almost imagine the families sitting down to dinner with their foods that they had gathered and prepared from the many push carts and their own gardens. Thought it was very amuzing that the Italian food was not considered very healthy and good for you to eat. Today it is referred to as the Mediterranean diet. It is now considered healthy and very delicious. Everyone loves pasta and pizza. It was interesting to see how the "Americans" tried to Americanized the immigrants. The immigrants still kept their traditional foods and we are benefiting today from those traditions in our culinary tastes. Enjoyed the recipes.
discerningwoman More than 1 year ago
I read a prior review and synopsis on this book and was MORE delighted than I could imagine. It gave me a "delicious" insight into how our appetites have been shaped by the immigrant women of an Eastside tenement on 97 Orchard. The included recipes lure me in to new found delights. The actual history that Ms Ziegelman brings forth are new revelations to me on some experiences of these immigrants and the life conditions they lived! Very original and a rare find.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thisis agood read for any one with an immigrant parent or grandparent . It resonates whether you are grrman iris italian or irish.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book isn't at all what I thought it was, but I enjoyed it just the same.
KatrinaAZ More than 1 year ago
Well researched. Interesting to move right in with people of another time and see life from their perspective.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
97 Orchard Street is in the neighborhood where I was raised. Yet, I never visited the street until last summer. The Museum was fascinating. Ziegelman's book enriched that experience. Not only did she describe procurement of food she provided the recipes. A worthwhile read,
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