97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

Overview

In this truly unique technical book, today's leading software architects present valuable principles on key development issues that go way beyond technology. More than four dozen architects — including Neal Ford, Michael Nygard, and Bill de hOra — offer advice for communicating with stakeholders, eliminating complexity, empowering developers, and many more practical lessons they've learned from years of experience. Among the 97 principles in this book, you'll find useful advice ...

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97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts

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Overview

In this truly unique technical book, today's leading software architects present valuable principles on key development issues that go way beyond technology. More than four dozen architects — including Neal Ford, Michael Nygard, and Bill de hOra — offer advice for communicating with stakeholders, eliminating complexity, empowering developers, and many more practical lessons they've learned from years of experience. Among the 97 principles in this book, you'll find useful advice such as:

  • Don't Put Your Resume Ahead of the Requirements (Nitin Borwankar)
  • Chances Are, Your Biggest Problem Isn't Technical (Mark Ramm)
  • Communication Is King; Clarity and Leadership, Its Humble Servants (Mark Richards)
  • Simplicity Before Generality, Use Before Reuse (Kevlin Henney)
  • For the End User, the Interface Is the System (Vinayak Hegde)
  • It's Never Too Early to Think About Performance (Rebecca Parsons)

To be successful as a software architect, you need to master both business and technology. This book tells you what top software architects think is important and how they approach a project. If you want to enhance your career, 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know is essential reading.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596522698
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/1/2009
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 222
  • Sales rank: 949,226
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard Monson-Haefel , an independent software developer, coauthored all five editions of Enterprise JavaBeans and Java Message Service (all O'Reilly). He's a software architect specializing in multi-touch interfaces and a leading expert on enterprise computing. More detail on his work and writings can be found at www.monson-haefel.com.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Chapter 1: Don't Put Your Resume Ahead of the Requirements

Chapter 2: Simplify Essential Complexity; Diminish Accidental Complexity

Chapter 3: Chances Are, Your Biggest Problem Isn't Technical

Chapter 4: Communication Is King; Clarity and Leadership, Its Humble Servants

Chapter 5: Application Architecture Determines Application Performance

Chapter 6: Seek the Value in Requested Capabilities

Chapter 7: Stand Up!

Chapter 8: Everything Will Ultimately Fail

Chapter 9: You're Negotiating More Often Than You Think

Chapter 10: Quantify

Chapter 11: One Line of Working Code Is Worth 500 of Specification

Chapter 12: There Is No One-Size-Fits-All Solution

Chapter 13: It's Never Too Early to Think About Performance

Chapter 14: Architecting Is About Balancing

Chapter 15: Commit-and-Run Is a Crime

Chapter 16: There Can Be More Than One

Chapter 17: Business Drives

Chapter 18: Simplicity Before Generality, Use Before Reuse

Chapter 19: Architects Must Be Hands On

Chapter 20: Continuously Integrate

Chapter 21: Avoid Scheduling Failures

Chapter 22: Architectural Tradeoffs

Chapter 23: Database As a Fortress

Chapter 24: Use Uncertainty As a Driver

Chapter 25: Warning: Problems in Mirror May Be Larger Than They Appear

Chapter 26: Reuse Is About People and Education, Not Just Architecture

Chapter 27: There Is No 'I' in Architecture

Chapter 28: Get the 1,000-Foot View

Chapter 29: Try Before Choosing

Chapter 30: Understand the Business Domain

Chapter 31: Programming Is an Act of Design

Chapter 32: Give Developers Autonomy

Chapter 33: Time Changes Everything

Chapter 34: "Software Architect" Has Only Lowercase a's; Deal with It

Chapter 35: Scope Is the Enemy of Success

Chapter 36: Value Stewardship Over Showmanship

Chapter 37: Software Architecture Has Ethical Consequences

Chapter 38: Skyscrapers Aren't Scalable

Chapter 39: Heterogeneity Wins

Chapter 40: It's All About Performance

Chapter 41: Engineer in the White Spaces

Chapter 42: Talk the Talk

Chapter 43: Context Is King

Chapter 44: Dwarves, Elves, Wizards, and Kings

Chapter 45: Learn from Architects of Buildings

Chapter 46: Fight Repetition

Chapter 47: Welcome to the Real World

Chapter 48: Don't Control, but Observe

Chapter 49: Janus the Architect

Chapter 50: Architects' Focus Is on the Boundaries and Interfaces

Chapter 51: Empower Developers

Chapter 52: Record Your Rationale

Chapter 53: Challenge Assumptions—Especially Your Own

Chapter 54: Share Your Knowledge and Experiences

Chapter 55: Pattern Pathology

Chapter 56: Don't Stretch the Architecture Metaphors

Chapter 57: Focus on Application Support and Maintenance

Chapter 58: Prepare to Pick Two

Chapter 59: Prefer Principles, Axioms, and Analogies to Opinion and Taste

Chapter 60: Start with a Walking Skeleton

Chapter 61: It Is All About The Data

Chapter 62: Make Sure the Simple Stuff Is Simple

Chapter 63: Before Anything, an Architect Is a Developer

Chapter 64: The ROI Variable

Chapter 65: Your System Is Legacy; Design for It

Chapter 66: If There Is Only One Solution, Get a Second Opinion

Chapter 67: Understand the Impact of Change

Chapter 68: You Have to Understand Hardware, Too

Chapter 69: Shortcuts Now Are Paid Back with Interest Later

Chapter 70: "Perfect" Is the Enemy of "Good Enough"

Chapter 71: Avoid "Good Ideas"

Chapter 72: Great Content Creates Great Systems

Chapter 73: The Business Versus the Angry Architect

Chapter 74: Stretch Key Dimensions to See What Breaks

Chapter 75: If You Design It, You Should Be Able to Code It

Chapter 76: A Rose by Any Other Name Will End Up As a Cabbage

Chapter 77: Stable Problems Get High-Quality Solutions

Chapter 78: It Takes Diligence

Chapter 79: Take Responsibility for Your Decisions

Chapter 80: Don't Be Clever

Chapter 81: Choose Your Weapons Carefully, Relinquish Them Reluctantly

Chapter 82: Your Customer Is Not Your Customer

Chapter 83: It Will Never Look Like That

Chapter 84: Choose Frameworks That Play Well with Others

Chapter 85: Make a Strong Business Case

Chapter 86: Control the Data, Not Just the Code

Chapter 87: Pay Down Your Technical Debt

Chapter 88: Don't Be a Problem Solver

Chapter 89: Build Systems to Be Zuhanden

Chapter 90: Find and Retain Passionate Problem Solvers

Chapter 91: Software Doesn't Really Exist

Chapter 92: Learn a New Language

Chapter 93: You Can't Future-Proof Solutions

Chapter 94: The User Acceptance Problem

Chapter 95: The Importance of Consommé

Chapter 96: For the End User, the Interface Is the System

Chapter 97: Great Software Is Not Built, It Is Grown

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I like it

    97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know is a book about things which are obvious and every software architect should know, remember and employ. The problem is that most things you can find inside the book are easily forgotten, underestimated and usually not implemented during day-to-day work.

    The book consists of 97 short essays. Each of them deals with a vital problem software architects often have to face. Although there are great number of brilliant stories in the book I especially like the one titled: You're Negotiating More Often Than You Think, which is about a project sponsor wanting to cut down expenses. Does it sound familiar to you? Do you know what to do when it happens? The book is a collective work which makes it even more valuable.

    Every day in the morning I start my work reading 1-3 essays to keep good practices in my memory and not forget management pitfalls lying in wait for me round the corner. I believe it helps me to become a better software architect. This book is a great and rare opportunity to learn from real experts in the field.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Obvious wisdom

    After reading this book, I've made a firm decision that I do not want to be an architect. My decision is not because of the book however.

    Within the pages of this book, you will get some great insight into the real world of being a software architect. Some of the tips are so obvious that you smack yourself for not already just knowing.

    Though I am not an architect, I found some of the tips such as "Perfect is the enemy of good enough" and a few others that relieved some of the weight off of my shoulders. If top notch architects tell me that good enough is good enough then I can stop struggling for perfection.

    This book is going on my shelf, but I have no doubt that I will pick it back up in 6 months and read it again.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted November 25, 2010

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    Posted March 7, 2011

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    Posted July 26, 2011

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