99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style by Matt Madden, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style

99 Ways to Tell a Story: Exercises in Style

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by Matt Madden
     
 

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99 Ways to Tell a Story is a series of engrossing one-page comics that tell the same story ninety-nine different ways. Inspired by Raymond Queneau’s 1947 Exercises in Style, a mainstay of creative writing courses, Madden’s project demonstrates the expansive range of possibilities available to all storytellers. Readers are taken on an

Overview

99 Ways to Tell a Story is a series of engrossing one-page comics that tell the same story ninety-nine different ways. Inspired by Raymond Queneau’s 1947 Exercises in Style, a mainstay of creative writing courses, Madden’s project demonstrates the expansive range of possibilities available to all storytellers. Readers are taken on an enlightening tour—sometimes amusing, always surprising—through the world of the story.

Writers and artists in every media will find Madden’s collection especially useful, even revelatory. Here is a chance to see the full scope of opportunities available to the storyteller, each applied to a single scenario: varying points of view, visual and verbal parodies, formal reimaginings, and radical shuffling of the basic components of the story. Madden’s amazing series of approaches will inspire storytellers to think through and around obstacles that might otherwise prevent them from getting good ideas onto the page. 99 Ways to Tell a Story provides a model that will spark productive conversations among all types of creative people: novelists, screenwriters, graphic designers, and cartoonists.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Retelling the same one-page comic 99 different ways sounds boring, but Madden, a leading proponent of the value of formalist exercises, demonstrates how well boundaries can drive creativity, inspired by the similar work of Raymond Queneau. A new discovery awaits the reader on every page. The basic scene is a nonstory about a man who forgets why he's looking in the refrigerator. In the variations, new elements are introduced and removed: different characters, more panels, fewer closeups, flashbacks, text-only or a focus on sound or color effects. Madden acknowledges the history of the medium with allusions to various genres and characters (including the Yellow Kid, Krazy Kat and Winsor McCay's Rarebit Fiend). Favorites include a how-to on building a comic, a palindromic story that reads the same backward and forward, and a calligram (with text formed into a question mark shape). The book's format is ideal, with each page of comics facing a small identifying label, so approaches don't compete with each other, yet pages placed in sequence add up to another narrative. Anyone interested in comics or storytelling will learn much about the interaction between format and content through comparison of Madden's many ingenious approaches. (Oct.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596090781
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/25/2005
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
1,245,874
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.15(h) x 0.55(d)
Age Range:
14 Years

Meet the Author

Matt Madden started self-publishing minicomics in the early 1990s. He published his first graphic novel, Black Candy (Black Eye Books), in 1998, and in 2001 published Odds Off (Highwater Books). Madden lives in Brooklyn with his wife, author and cartoonist Jessica Abel. He works in comics and illustration; he also teaches comics at the School of Visual Arts and Yale University. His latest work appears in A Fine Mess, his biannual series published by Alternative Comics.

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