Boy Named Goo

A Boy Named Goo

4.6 5
by Goo Goo Dolls
     
 

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Produced by Lou Giordano with his trademark full-bodied, immediately accessible, but never washed-out sound, A Boy Named Goo finally got the band across to a wide audience, and deservedly so. Right from the start, the Goo Goo Dolls sound perfectly on the right track after

Overview

Produced by Lou Giordano with his trademark full-bodied, immediately accessible, but never washed-out sound, A Boy Named Goo finally got the band across to a wide audience, and deservedly so. Right from the start, the Goo Goo Dolls sound perfectly on the right track after Superstar Car Wash's OK but ultimately go-nowhere feeling -- "Long Way Down" is another stone-cold classic of wounded romanticism wedded to catchy Cheap Trick-tinged punk-pop, Rzeznik's singing the not-so-secret weapon. Hearing him on the descending chorus, matching the just sad enough guitar crunch, makes one realize that there's always hope for full-bodied rock & roll. The eternal Replacements tag now makes less sense than ever -- the Goos have their own enjoyable sound, Rzeznik's a more individual singer than ever, and all three rock out accordingly. Takac similarly has his own sonic improvements, his formerly rasped high register now just a little more controlled but no less affecting, as winners like "Burnin' Up" and "Somethin' Bad" easily demonstrate. Rzeznik-sung highlights are equally everywhere -- the commercial but never stupid "Naked," with a great chorus and immediately radio-friendly music, the equally sharp "Only One," and the mighty fine "Ain't That Unusual." There's no question what the highlight is, though -- however untypical of the rest of the album's mid-range feedback fun, "Name," with its sweet but sad acoustic arrangement, made perfect sense as the Goos' long-delayed radio breakthrough. Rzeznik's empathetic vocal, delivering one of his best lyrics on favored subjects of friendship, loss, and fame, matches unfolky strumming and quiet energy, creating a song that feels like both a farewell to the American Dream and to a long-lost partner. All this without sounding a Bruce Springsteen sermon -- a rare thing indeed.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/14/1995
Label:
Warner Bros / Wea
UPC:
0093624575023
catalogNumber:
45750
Rank:
31150

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A Boy Named Goo 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album is a must for any collection. ABNG is the GGDs best album!! Lots of hard driving rock tunes mixed with the big hit
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a very good album, but just not quite good enough to get 5 stars.
Guest More than 1 year ago
this cd really kicks! (im listening to it right now!) i stole the cd from my dad who thought the name was interesting. he did not like it too much and so i "borrowed" it with no intention to return. i didnt listen to it for a long time after i "borrowed" it from him and then one day on a long car ride, i didnt have anything else to listen to so i played it and fell in LOVE!!!! i did some research and bought their other cds too (they all rock on!) and they are one of my favorite bands now. i think my favorite song from this cd would have to be either long way down, naked, name, or eyes wide open. o and disconnected rocks too! anyways, the goo goo dolls rock and still kick butt. i love them!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is the album that got GGD recognized. It's absolutely awesome. You have rock 'n roll mixed w/ punk. I has the infamous song 'Name', such a sweet melody w/ an added touch of rock in between.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago