A Century of Carnival Glass

( 1 )

Overview

The creation of classic American Carnival Glass took the world by storm in the early 1900s, bringing color and beauty in the form of iridized glass to homes everywhere. Carnivals iridescent, rainbow colored appearance was achieved by spraying the still hot glass with a liquid solution of various metallic salts. A short while later, Europe, South America, and India (among others) began making Carnival--and the success story was repeated. Featuring over 400 outstanding color photographs and 130 black and white ...
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Overview

The creation of classic American Carnival Glass took the world by storm in the early 1900s, bringing color and beauty in the form of iridized glass to homes everywhere. Carnivals iridescent, rainbow colored appearance was achieved by spraying the still hot glass with a liquid solution of various metallic salts. A short while later, Europe, South America, and India (among others) began making Carnival--and the success story was repeated. Featuring over 400 outstanding color photographs and 130 black and white illustrations, this thoroughly researched and visually exciting book covers more than one hundred years in the history of Carnival Glass--from classic American Carnival right up to the present day. A multitude of previously unknown patterns are assigned to their manufacturers. Many surprises are in store, as new producers of European Carnival are fully documented and illustrated: Sowerby, Brockwitz, Eda, Rindskopf, and Jain, to name just a few. Detailed information on over 500 Carnival patterns--plus shapes, colors, and values--is all included, along with a bibliography, three appendices, and an index.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764312090
  • Publisher: Schiffer Publishing, Ltd.
  • Publication date: 7/28/2007
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 1,045,732
  • Product dimensions: 8.78 (w) x 11.18 (h) x 1.07 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2001

    From the authors - plus a review by Dr. R. Cinclair

    A thoroughly researched and visually exciting new book, ¿A Century Of Carnival Glass¿ traces the story of Carnival from its origins and inspirations right up to the present day. It contains almost 420 full color photographs, many of them over-size, plus 130 revealing and fascinating catalog and archive illustrations ¿ all on 256 full size pages. <p> Beginning with a pictorial review of Classic American Carnival, the book breaks new ground, as it fully details and illustrates the production of Carnival Glass in Europe, South America, and India. Myths and mysteries are solved, numerous puzzles are answered, and a multitude of previously 'unknown' patterns are assigned to their manufacturers. Many surprises are in store, as 'new' producers of European Carnival are fully documented and illustrated. Sowerby, Brockwitz, Eda, Riihimaki, Rindskopf and Jain are just some of the many companies examined in great detail. There is a constant stream of new information from the Americas, Europe and India ¿ much of it is in print for the very first time. Links and connections, history and documentation, analysis and proof ¿ it¿s all there. Many previously unknown or un-identified patterns are traced to their manufacturer ¿ fully substantiated with catalog evidence. <p> The book's final chapters enter the era of Contemporary Carnival Glass, as its legacy in the USA comes full circle-back to the Ohio Valley. Fenton, Imperial, Boyd, Mosser, St. Clair, Indiana, Summit, Westmoreland, Smith and the new Northwood Art Glass Company are all documented, as are many smaller producers. Late Carnival is also covered, as are trademarks, fakes and reproductions. Detailed information on over 500 Carnival patterns - plus shapes, colors, and values - is all included, along with a bibliography, three appendices, and an index. <p> Below you can also read a book review of `A Century of Carnival Glass¿ written by Dr. Richard J. Cinclair, President of the International Carnival Glass Association. <p> If you do not have A Century of Carnival Glass in your library, you do not have a complete set of references about our beloved Carnival Glass. This is a new book with much never published information that gives the serious collector answers to here to fore unanswered questions. <p> This two-hundred and fifty page plus volume is filled with great color pictures of not often seen Carnival Glass. The book is slick and professional. There is a great bibliography, an excellent index and a number of useful references at the back of the volume. However, the meat of the book is in the new information about non-American made Carnival Glass. A quick but thorough review of what the Thistlewoods call ¿Inspirations¿ or the beginnings of Carnival Glass is handled in Part One. In ¿Links and Connections¿, the authors look at some of the connections between the manufactures in the United States and those in Europe. <p> In Part Two, ¿The Production of Iridized Glass in Europe¿ the authors chronicle the over three hundred known patterns made in Europe. Most of the European Carnival comes in the post World War One era or the 1920's. These were not new glass houses but those new to iridized glass. These glass makers had long histories and typically held excellent reputations. Names like Brockwitz in Germany, Eda Glasbruk in Sweden, Sowerby in the United Kingdom and others who made multiple patterns and colors of iridized glass are examined. Within Part Two, the makers by country of origin are thoroughly discussed. Many collectors will be surprised at the great number of non-American patterns. There are a number of great black and white reproductions of actual ads from the glass trade papers of the 1920's. Vase collectors will have a field day with the many pictured vases. Collectors will quickly note that the European manufacturers preferred marigold or a dark blue to the other known colors. This writer was surprised to find a small section on iridized glass made in th

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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