A Century of Immigration: 1820-1924

A Century of Immigration: 1820-1924

by Christopher Collier
     
 

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History is dramatic -- and the renowned, award-winning authors Christopher Collier and James Lincoln Collier demonstrate this in a compelling series aimed at young readers. Covering American history from the founding of Jamestown through present day, these volumes explore far beyond the dates and events of a historical chronicle to present a moving illumination of the

Overview

History is dramatic -- and the renowned, award-winning authors Christopher Collier and James Lincoln Collier demonstrate this in a compelling series aimed at young readers. Covering American history from the founding of Jamestown through present day, these volumes explore far beyond the dates and events of a historical chronicle to present a moving illumination of the ideas, opinions, attitudes and tribulations that led to the birth of this great nation.
A Century of Immigration reviews the century of 1820 through 1920, in which there were two waves of immigration to the United States. This book discusses the varied motivations and nationalities of these new Americans, as well as the effects of mass immigration on the country as a whole, and the rise of antiforeign sentiments among more recent immigrants. The text is enhanced with photographs, and images of historic art & artifacts.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Greg M. Romaneck
In our modern age concerns centering on multiculturalism, immigration, and cultural diversity all are fodder for debate. Yet, these issues have a long history in the United States. This offering of "The Drama of American History" series deals with the first two great waves of immigrants who fled to these shores in search of a new and better life. Beginning with the first large-scale movement of the pre to post Civil War era the authors dedicate attention to specific ethnic and national groups who were the pioneers of immigration to this land. Primarily Irish and German in derivation these early immigrants came to the Unites States for a combination of economic, political, and religious reasons. Although they faced great odds the immigrants of the first wave who came primarily from northern and Western Europe were able to carve out their niche in the New World. The second wave of immigrants who crossed the seas in the latter nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was made up of more heterogeneous populations. Italians, Russians, Poles, and other Slavic people faced even more stigmatization than the earlier immigrants did. Japanese and Chinese sojourners, as well as Jewish immigrants, also came as part of the second wave. All of these divergent peoples were more prone to social rejection and prejudice. The issues of religious, linguistic, cultural, and racial difference created significant backlash against those second wave immigrants. All of these factors are touched upon and detailed by the authors as they provide a vivid description of the movement of people to our melting pot and mixing bowl of a nation. This is an excellent book in a fine historical series.
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-Although many history books for children aim only at an objective presentation of the facts, the Colliers have opted for interpretational history. As the series preface states, the authors are interested in "citizenship education" and in presenting "the basic themes of the American story, and what they mean to us now." In Immigration, they explain that conditions in the immigrants' homelands and in the U.S., including racial and ethnic prejudice, class distinctions, and maltreatment of the powerless by the powerful, created the vast waves of movement that had such an impact on this country in the 19th century. Yet, only a generation or two later, immigrants or their children often expressed anti-immigrant sentiments against new arrivals. Likewise, in Industry, the tremendous economic boon to the U.S. is not trumpeted to the exclusion of the abuse of workers-including children-by early industry giants, and the deep philanthropy of some figures is explicitly tied to the wealth gained by owners at the expense of employees. By focusing on broad themes, the Colliers are able to show cause and effect over several decades and to make the sweep of time "bite-sized" and intelligible. The frequent full-color and black-and-white period photographs and engravings effectively supplement and enrich the texts.-Coop Renner, Moreno Elementary School, El Paso, TX Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781620645192
Publisher:
Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Publication date:
11/07/2012
Series:
Drama of American History Series , #15
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
96
File size:
12 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Born in New York City in 1928, author James Lincoln Collier is beloved by young readers in particular for the award-winning historical novels he has written with his brother, historian Christopher Collier. A graduate of Hamilton College, Collier served in the U.S. Army after college and then worked as a magazine editor for several years. Perhaps his most famous children's book is the Newbery Honor Book he wrote with his brother, the popular Revolutionary War story My Brother Sam Is Dead. The father of two children, Collier is also an accomplished trombone player. He lives in New York City, where he continues to write and play jazz music. Christopher Collier was born in New York City in 1930. He attended Clark University where he earned his B.A. and he received his M.A. and Ph.D. from Columbia University. He has taught school in Connecticut and at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is currently Professor of American History at the University of Bridgeport in Connecticut. Like his brother James, Christopher Collier is by avocation a musician (his instruments are the trumpet and flugelhorn). He and his wife Bonnie live in Orange, Connecticut, in an old (1790) house they have restored. He is the father of two sons and a daughter.

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