A Christmas Carol

( 861 )

Overview

One of the best-loved and most quoted stories of "the man who invented Christmas"-English writer Charles Dickens-A Christmas Carol debuted in 1843 and has touched millions of hearts since. Cruel miser Ebeneezer Scrooge has never met a shilling he doesn't like. . .and hardly a man he does. And he hates Christmas most of all. When Scrooge is visited by his old partner, Jacob Marley, and the ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present, and Christmas Yet to Come, he learns eternal lessons of charity, kindness, and ...
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A Christmas Carol

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Overview

One of the best-loved and most quoted stories of "the man who invented Christmas"-English writer Charles Dickens-A Christmas Carol debuted in 1843 and has touched millions of hearts since. Cruel miser Ebeneezer Scrooge has never met a shilling he doesn't like. . .and hardly a man he does. And he hates Christmas most of all. When Scrooge is visited by his old partner, Jacob Marley, and the ghosts of Christmas Past, Christmas Present, and Christmas Yet to Come, he learns eternal lessons of charity, kindness, and goodwill. Experience a true Victorian Christmas!

A miser learns the true meaning of Christmas when three ghostly visitors review his past and foretell his future.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This reissued recording of Stewart's touted Broadway performance might prove to be the enduring interpretation of Dickens's beloved tale of the miserly Ebenezer Scrooge and the ghosts of past, present, and future who catalyze his transformation. In a production stripped of sound effects, Stewart's theatrical talents take center stage. Reading with a voice that it is at once commanding and fragile, he creates a Scrooge of unexpected complexity and pathos. A spare and dazzling listen that might be the best rendition of the classic since the 1951 Alistair Sim production. (Nov.)
School Library Journal
Gr 3 Up–Dickens’s cautionary tale of an embittered, stingy old man learning to be a happier, more giving person thanks to the intervention of four ghosts has long been fodder for holiday collections. From its stark opening spread (“MARLEY WAS DEAD”) to the final one with its much more cheerful winter scene, this year’s version, illustrated in Helquist’s darkly comic style, is one of the best. Some of that credit must go to Greenhut, who provided the abridgment. Sacrificing none of Dickens’s rich language, this retelling reads beautifully. The artist uses watercolor, pencil, and pastel to create cinematic artwork that contains amusing details; additionally, there are a number of pen-and-ink vignettes that help set the scenes. A winning combination of sparkling prose and exciting art.–Mara Alpert, Los Angeles Public Library
Sunday Express
A sure-fire tear-jerker. At one public reading by Dickens in Boston, there were 'so many pocket handkerchiefs it looked as if a snowstorm had gotten into the hall.
Times
It has it all: a spooky ghost story, a heartwarming redemption, and a great plot with a satisfyingly ending.
From the Publisher

"Pulp! Classics are really neat editions . . . . The text is exactly what we're familiar with—the packaging is in line with those tawdry paperbacks of yore: Lurid art, washed out colors, and, most importantly, pithy taglines." —On Our Minds, the official blog of Scholastic, Inc. 

"We immediately fell in love with these awesome wintage-style redesigns of classic novels." —Flavorwire

The Horn Book
“A smooth abridgment. The illustrations are rich and lush.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781783220137
  • Publisher: ReadZone Books
  • Publication date: 8/1/2014
  • Series: Graphic Dickens Series
  • Pages: 64
  • Sales rank: 441,290
  • Age range: 12 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Charles Dickens
Charles Dickens is considered the greatest novelist of the Victorian Era. Born in Portsmouth, England, in 1812, he created many of the world's most memorable fictional characters, several of whom appear in this book. Charles left school at an early age to support his family, following his father's incarceration in debtor's prison. This no doubt influenced his emphasis on charity toward the poor and those in debt, particularly noticeable in this work. He died in 1870 at the age of 58. His lasting legacy can be found in the many literary, stage, and screen adaptations of his works, even to the present day.

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• ~

Hal Moroz is an Attorney & Counselor at Law, having represented clients up to and including the United States Supreme Court. He is a former Judge, having served as both a county Judge and a city Chief Judge in the State of Georgia. Judge Moroz is also a retired U.S. Army airborne Infantry officer, longtime veterans advocate, educator, and author.

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• ~

Judge Moroz is author of the bestseller "Living a Godly Life" by Hal Moroz, and "The New Knighthood" by Hal Moroz, amongst other literary works, including Introductions to such classics as "The Rough Riders" by Theodore Roosevelt, "The Legends of King Arthur and His Knights" by Sir James Knowles, and "God Wills It!" by William Stearns Davis. His many writings can be found on the internet or through a simple search at Amazon.com.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Hal Moroz can be reached through an internet search or through his email at: hal@morozlaw.com or his website: MorozLaw.com

Biography

Born on February 7, 1812, Charles Dickens was the second of eight children in a family burdened with financial troubles. Despite difficult early years, he became the most successful British writer of the Victorian age.

In 1824, young Charles was withdrawn from school and forced to work at a boot-blacking factory when his improvident father, accompanied by his mother and siblings, was sentenced to three months in a debtor's prison. Once they were released, Charles attended a private school for three years. The young man then became a solicitor's clerk, mastered shorthand, and before long was employed as a Parliamentary reporter. When he was in his early twenties, Dickens began to publish stories and sketches of London life in a variety of periodicals.

It was the publication of Pickwick Papers (1836-1837) that catapulted the twenty-five-year-old author to national renown. Dickens wrote with unequaled speed and often worked on several novels at a time, publishing them first in monthly installments and then as books. His early novels Oliver Twist (1837-1838), Nicholas Nickleby (1838-1839), The Old Curiosity Shop (1840-1841), and A Christmas Carol (1843) solidified his enormous, ongoing popularity. As Dickens matured, his social criticism became increasingly biting, his humor dark, and his view of poverty darker still. David Copperfield (1849-1850), Bleak House (1852-1853), Hard Times (1854), A Tale of Two Cities (1859), Great Expectations (1860-1861), and Our Mutual Friend (1864-1865) are the great works of his masterful and prolific period.

In 1858 Dickens's twenty-three-year marriage to Catherine Hogarth dissolved when he fell in love with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. The last years of his life were filled with intense activity: writing, managing amateur theatricals, and undertaking several reading tours that reinforced the public's favorable view of his work but took an enormous toll on his health. Working feverishly to the last, Dickens collapsed and died on June 8, 1870, leaving The Mystery of Edwin Drood uncompleted.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of David Copperfield.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Charles John Huffam Dickens (full name) "Boz" (pen name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 7, 1812
    2. Place of Birth:
      Portsmouth, England
    1. Date of Death:
      June 18, 1870
    2. Place of Death:
      Gad's Hill, Kent, England

Read an Excerpt

Christmas Carol


By Charles Dickens

Stewart, Tabori and Chang

Copyright © 1997 Charles Dickens
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1556706480

Chapter One

MARLEY was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it: and Scrooge's name was good upon 'Change, for anything he chose to put his hand to. Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail.
Mind! I don't mean to say that I know, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a door-nail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade. But the wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile; and my unhallowed hands shall not disturb it, or the Country's done for. You will therefore permit me to repeat, emphatically, that Marley was as dead as a door-nail.

Scrooge knew he was dead? Of course he did. How could it be otherwise? Scrooge and he were partners for I don't know how many years. Scrooge was his sole executor, his sole administrator, his sole assign, his sole residuary legatee, his sole friend and sole mourner. And even Scrooge was not so dreadfully cut up by the sad event, but that he was an excellent man of business on the very day of the funeral, and solemnised it with an undoubted bargain.

The mention of Marley's funeral brings me back to the point I started from. There is no doubt that Marley was dead. This must be distinctly understood, or nothing wonderful can come of the story I am going to relate. If we were not perfectly convinced that Hamlet's Father died before the play began, there would be nothing more remarkable in his taking a stroll at night, in an easterly wind, upon his own ramparts, than there would be in any other middle-aged gentleman rashly turning out after dark in a breezy spot-say Saint Paul's Churchyard for instance-literally to astonish his son's weak mind.

Scrooge never painted out Old Marley's name. There it stood, years afterwards, above the warehouse door: Scrooge and Marley. The firm was known as Scrooge and Marley. Sometimes people new to the business called Scrooge Scrooge, and sometimes Marley, but he answered to both names: it was all the same to him.

Oh! but he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old sinner! Hard and sharp as flint, from which no steel had ever struck out generous fire; secret, and self-contained, and solitary as an oyster. The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, shrivelled his cheek, stiffened his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; and spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice. A frosty rime was on his head, and on his eyebrows, and his wiry chin. He carried his own low temperature always about with him; he iced his office in the dog-days; and didn't thaw it one degree at Christmas.

External heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge. No warmth could warm, nor wintry weather chill him. No wind that blew was bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty. Foul weather didn't know where to have him. The heaviest rain, and snow, and hail, and sleet, could boast of the advantage over him in only one respect. They often 'came down' handsomely, and Scrooge never did.

Nobody ever stopped him in the street to say, with gladsome looks, 'My dear Scrooge, how are you? when will you come to see me?' No beggars implored him to bestow a trifle, no children asked him what it was 'oclock, no man or woman ever once in all his life inquired the way to such and such a place, of Scrooge. Even the blindmen's dogs appeared to know him; and when they saw him coming on, would tug their owners into doorways and up courts; and then would wag their tails as though they said, 'no eye at all is better than an evil eye, dark master!'

But what did Scrooge care? It was the very thing he liked. To edge his way along the crowded paths of life, warning all human sympathy to keep its distance, was what the knowing ones call 'nuts' to Scrooge.
Once upon a time-of all the good days in the year, on Christmas Eve-old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house. It was cold, bleak, biting weather: foggy withal: and he could hear the people in the court outside, go wheezing up and down, beating their hands upon their breasts, and stamping their feet upon the pavement-stones to warm them. The city clocks had only just gone three, but it was quite dark already: it had not been light all day: and candles were flaring in the windows of the neighbouring offices, like ruddy smears upon the palpable brown air. The fog came pouring in at every chink and keyhole, and was so dense without, that although the court was of the narrowest, the houses opposite were mere phantoms. To see the dingy cloud come drooping down, obscuring everything, one might have thought that Nature lived hard by, and was brewing on a large scale.

The door of Scrooge's counting-house was open that he might keep his eye upon his clerk, who in a dismal little cell beyond, a sort of tank, was copying letters. Scrooge had a very small fire, but the clerk's fire was so very much smaller that it looked like one coal. But he couldn't replenish it, for Scrooge kept the coal-box in his own room; and so surely as the clerk came in with the shovel, the master predicted that it would be necessary for them to part. Wherefore the clerk put on his white comforter, and tried to warm himself at the candle; in which effort, not being a man of a strong imagination, he failed.

Continues...


Excerpted from Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens Copyright © 1997 by Charles Dickens. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Introduction
Charles Dickens: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text
A Christmas Carol
Appendix A: Reflections on Christmas
1. Washington Irving, from The Sketch Book (1822)
2. Charles Dickens, "A Christmas Dinner" (1836)
3. Charles Dickens, from The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (1836-37)
4. Thomas K. Hervey, from The Book of Christmas (1837)
5. John Calcott Horsley / Sir Henry Cole, The First Christmas Card (1843)
6. Charles Dickens, "A Christmas Tree" (1850)
7. Charles Dickens, "What Christmas Is, As We Grow Older" (1851)
Appendix B: Child Labor, Education, and the Workhouse
1. From Report of the Children's Employment Commission (1842)
2. From Charles Dickens's Speech at the First Annual Soiree of the Athenaeum: Manchester (Oct. 5, 1843)
3. Charles Dickens, "A Walk in a Workhouse" (1850)
Appendix C: From Letters of Charles Dickens
Appendix D: Contemporary Reviews of A Christmas Carol
1. Charles Mackay, Morning Chronicle (December 19, 1843)
2. Anon., Athenaeum (December 23, 1843)
3. Thomas Hood, Hood's Magazine, (January 4, 1844)
4. Laman Blanchard, Ainsworth's Magazine (January 1844)
5. Anon., The Times (January 7, 1844)
6. William Makepeace Thackeray, Fraser's Magazine, (February 1844)
Appendix E: Notable Film, Television, and Radio Adaptations of A Christmas Carol
Select Bibliography

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 861 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(599)

4 Star

(118)

3 Star

(51)

2 Star

(22)

1 Star

(71)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 862 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 15, 2010

    This is a great book and I would recommend it for all readers.

    Do you celebrate Christmas? Well if you don't your on the same level as Scrooge the main character of A Christmas Carol. Charles Dickens created a true masterpiece when he wrote A Christmas Carol, telling a story of a man who had to decide what is right to change his future. This fictitious story really gets the gears in your head turning. Scrooge is a very mean man in 1800s London. His business partner, Marley, dies at the very beginning of the story and later visits scrooge as a ghost. He tells Scrooge he will be visited by three ghosts. The Ghost of Christmas Past, the Ghost of Christmas Present, and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. They take him through different parts of his life. All three have different personalities. Charles Dickens gives great details of the characters without telling you directly. Throughout the whole story Charles dickens keeps you wanting more of the story line and makes sense with the book. Overall it's a great book with sophisticated words, and I would recommend this book for all readers.

    34 out of 46 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2011

    To idk

    Enhanced means : Intensify, increase, or further improve the quality, value or extent of.

    So by an enhanced book they probably mean that it has error-text, no huge spaces between paragraphs. Stuff like that. It just means that they fixed it up so that you can enjoy it more.

    By the way, this is an amazing book. You should get it.

    Hope that i was of assistance to you.

    27 out of 37 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 28, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Classic...

    I read this book every year around the holidays and really enjoy it every time. I have seen many versions of the story such as Scrooge and a Christmas Carol in movies but nothing beats the book.

    22 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 22, 2012

    Enjoyable!

    It was a nice holiday story to finish out Christmas season. What was really nice was being able to listen to the audio and hear the story behind the story.

    10 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 7, 2012

    love it

    I love the story Christmas Carol and have it in every media you can get by everyone you can think of from the muppets to albert finney, but had never read the book so when I got my NOOK tablet for Christmas and so this I said it time to read the book or at least listen and I did both and it is still the most wonderful story at Christmas.

    5 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2012

    Christmas carol

    Best christmas book ever its a great classic book

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 27, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    HIGHLY RECOMMEND! YOU SHOULD TOTALLY READ THIS BOOK!!!!!!

    I love this book and the style of writing (Charles Dickens did, after all, write this in the 19th century) Eerie...and I was surprised by the way it really made me feel chills! But this book isn't just about the ghosts, it has a great moral of the story with a nice ending!

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2011

    audiobook is not nook compatible

    The audiobook mentioned was a selling point for me. It isn't a file, but a text internet address on the very last page of the ebook that the nook does not recognize as a hyperlink. Apparently this guy Sam Ngo went and found the free ebook with illustrations and also found a free audiobook file on an archive website somewhere and wrote out the file's internet address on the last page of the book and epub'd it. You would have to look up the file online from your computer, download the audiobook and physically hook up your nook to transfer the file from your computer to your nook. So why pay this guy 1.99? Just go out and find the free files yourself. Probably deleting this. Oh and you have to laugh when the guy says "money back guaranteed... just email us" and then he doesn't give you and email address.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2012

    I liked this a lot!

    I liked this a lot, especially the reading by his grandaughter.

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 14, 2012

    Great Book

    Good classic read for the holidays. Love the linked chapter contexts in the front of the book.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 6, 2012

    An excellent Classic!!!

    Just in time for the Christmas Holiday. We really enjoyed it!!

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    A great way to enjoy a classic

    Really enjoyed this enchanced version, added more insight about the author. Enjoyed this classic book very much!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2011

    A true classic

    Great for everyone

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    Awesome

    First off, pizza and pokemon??? SERSOULY!!!!!!!!! This is for THE CHRISTMAS CAROL !!!!! NOT pizza or pokemon!!!!!!! SECOND OFF, I love the CHRISTMAS CAROL!!!!!!

    3 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2011

    OMG!!! This book is so soooo awesome!

    Don't no Y some children think its boring with long sentences and hard words lol MayB they R like in Preschool or someplace .This is Gr8 story .

    Ps If you cant read this then go check out the Muppet versionon DVD lol gtg

    3 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2014

    Grow up, you stupid children.

    This is a forum for reviewing books, not playing your immature kitty cat roll playing games.
    A Christmas Carol is one of the greatest works of literature ever written. If any of you are able to read beyond a second grade level, I highly suggest you read it. You might actually learn something.
    Otherwise, take your Cat Chow wannabe crap elsewhere. Those of us who actually read books are sick and tired of you.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2013

    ¿Bah! Humbug!¿ Set in Victorian England, this classic Christmas

    “Bah! Humbug!” Set in Victorian England, this classic Christmas tale of reclamation and redemption by Charles Dickens features Ebenezer Scrooge, a bitter, greedy old miser, who is visited by the specter of his dead partner, Jacob Marley. Dickens skillfully weaves the story of Scrooge’s life through the visits of the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future, and in the end we all learn that the true meaning of Christmas is love, joy, and brotherhood for our fellow man. Dickens is a masterful storyteller, and Christmas Carol is a masterful tale well worth the read.
    Rebecca E.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2013

    Terrible, nothing like the movie.

    Terrible, nothing like the movie.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2013

    I give the book 3 starts because the story alone merits 5.  The

    I give the book 3 starts because the story alone merits 5.  The two stars I took away are because, while the book may be leather-bound, it is soft cover.  Nothing in the description had alerted me to this.  I have built up a decent collection of B&N Leatherbound classics and this is the first time I have been displeased with the quality of one of the books.

    I would still recommend buying it, but know that this is not like most of the other leatherbound classics.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 28, 2012

    You only THINK you know this story!

    For as often as I've seen the movies, I've never read the book and decided that this was the time to change that. A quick read, I only 200 pages on my Nook, but I was enthrall end with each word and quite surprised by how funny it was! Dickens isn't exactly famous for his sense of humor but the warmth, compassion and empathy that you really only see all in a rush at the end of te movie, has a chance to build slowly but surely in the book. Do yourself a favor - pick this one up and read it. I'm sure I'll read it again every Christmas season.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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