A City under the Sea

A City under the Sea

by Norbert Wu
     
 

Magnificent coral formations create a lovely and mysterious ocean home for schools of anemones, sharks, and barracuda in this photo essay by one of the world's leading underwater photographers. Flounders hide in the sandy bottom and predators lurk at the edges while a sea turtle swims through to lay her eggs on the beach beyond. Colorful and dramatic photos bring to…  See more details below

Overview

Magnificent coral formations create a lovely and mysterious ocean home for schools of anemones, sharks, and barracuda in this photo essay by one of the world's leading underwater photographers. Flounders hide in the sandy bottom and predators lurk at the edges while a sea turtle swims through to lay her eggs on the beach beyond. Colorful and dramatic photos bring to the reader the wonders of a very special undersea realm.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
A sea turtle seeks a place to lay her eggs and, as she swims through the coral reef, other sea creatures come into view. Facts and plenty of colorful photos depict this haven for coral, sponges, and fish. It is an underwater tour that is bound to make readers think about the future of coral reefs and the necessity for reef conservation.
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-Manta rays glide gracefully by as readers follow an old green turtle back to the coral atoll where she was born. The reef is populated with a fascinating variety of creatures. Bright pink anemones hide colorful clownfish. A cleaner shrimp waves its antennae. Sea fans waving in the currents provide homes for cowrie snails and tiny blenny fish. This fact-filled book assumes that youngsters already have a basic knowledge of coral reefs. References to "plankton filled waters" do not hint at what plankton is, and descriptions such as "a butterfly fish nips at some of the sea star's tube feet" assumes a certain understanding of starfish anatomy. The lack of either a glossary or an index narrows the book's appeal considerably. The full-color photographs are occasionally marred by chapter headings that are printed directly on them, causing both visual and verbal confusion. For example, "The Coral Reef" is printed on a closeup of coral polyps rather than a picture of an actual reef. Mysterious, multi-colored lines wind their way through the text, further obstructing visibility and adding to the cluttered look. One comes away feeling a distinct lack of focus. As the turtle reaches her ultimate destination (a beach to lay her eggs), it isn't clear whether she or the reef is the focus. Mary E. Cerullo's outstanding Coral Reef (Cobblehill, 1996) covers the same subject much better.-Lisa Wu Stowe, Great Neck Library, NY
Susan Dove Lempke
nger for reading aloud. The names alone--fairy basslets, Caesar grunts--hint at the mysterious nature of the world under the sea presented here. Drawing on his extensive diving and photography experience to sort out the various animals that populate the territory around a coral reef, Wu wraps facts around the story of a sea turtle working its way toward sand to lay its eggs. The device sometimes seems clumsy, but the information conveyed will fascinate readers, as will the brilliant colors, patterns, and body shapes of the sea creatures that are captured in numerous close-up pictures.
Kirkus Reviews
Wu (Fish Faces, 1993, etc.) describes the special world of the coral reef by day and night. An inviting text highlights the author's firsthand diving experiences, but the many full-color underwater photographs—sometimes four or more to a page—are so small they lose impact. The brief captions give the common names of the subjects but not the scientific names, locales, and size. The spider crab, octopus, and squirrelfish appear in photos of similar size that will leave viewers unable to determine the sizes of these creatures in nature. The design is fussy: The photos have been cropped into overlapping silhouettes, ovals, circles, squares, and rectangles of every size, from full-page bleeds to those only slightly larger than postage stamps; lines of text fall across shadowy, worm-like forms tinted pink, blue, or gold. While colorful, Wu's book—without an index—is not as useful as Cerullo's Coral Reef: A City that Never Sleeps (1996). She has a more compelling narrative, employs larger, more arresting photos, and provides further reading and an index.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689318962
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
03/05/1996
Pages:
28
Product dimensions:
9.31(w) x 9.33(h) x 0.42(d)
Lexile:
NC1150L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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