A Communications Cornucopia: Markle Foundation Essays on Information Policy

Overview

The essays in this book provide a broad look at the many ways that information technology relates to issues of governance and public policy. Adjusting regulatory institutions to the new technical realities is a great challenge. Will monopoly power threaten the traditionally regulated areas of telephones and cable television or the software systems that integrate all information technologies into a single system with many competing players? Can traditional approaches to intellectual property rights and control of ...
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Overview

The essays in this book provide a broad look at the many ways that information technology relates to issues of governance and public policy. Adjusting regulatory institutions to the new technical realities is a great challenge. Will monopoly power threaten the traditionally regulated areas of telephones and cable television or the software systems that integrate all information technologies into a single system with many competing players? Can traditional approaches to intellectual property rights and control of socially harmful content be applied to the converged information sector? This book sheds light on these issues, and in so doing demonstrates the usefulness of rigorous, multidisciplinary policy analysis in assessing the significance of changing technology.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Provides a broad look at the ways in which information technology relates to issues of governance and public policy. Sections cover major themes in contemporary communications policymaking, including media and democracy, media and children, and communications policy. Specific subjects include television and the transformation of Russia, media content labeling systems, global communication policy and the realization of human rights, the evolving politics of telecommunications regulation, and electronic substitution in the household-level demand for postal delivery services. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780815761150
  • Publisher: Brookings Institution Press
  • Publication date: 4/30/1998
  • Pages: 674
  • Product dimensions: 5.96 (w) x 8.97 (h) x 1.33 (d)

Meet the Author

Roger G. Noll is professor of economics at Stanford University and a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. Monroe E. Price is professor of law at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law at Wolfson College, Oxford University.

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Table of Contents

Preface
1 Communications Policy: Convergence, Choice, and the Markle Foundation 1
Pt. 1 Media and Democracy
2 Manufacturing Discord: Media in the Affirmative Action Debate 39
3 The New Telecommunications Technology: Endless Frontier or the End of Democracy? 72
4 And Deliver Us from Segmentation 99
5 Media, Transition, and Democracy: Television and the Transformation of Russia 113
6 The Market for Loyalties in the Electronic Media 138
7 Turner, Denver, and Reno 172
8 Global Communication Policy and the Realization of Human Rights 218
9 Promoting Deliberative Public Discourse on the Web 243
Pt. 2 Media and Children
10 Sesame Street and Educational Television for Children 279
11 The Children's Television Workshop: The Experiment Continues 297
12 Children's Television in European Public Broadcasting 337
13 Media Content Labeling Systems 350
Pt. 3 Communications Policy
14 The Evolving Politics of Telecommunications Regulation 379
15 Telephone Subsidies, Income Redistribution, and Consumer Welfare 400
16 Electronic Substitution in the Household-Level Demand for Postal Delivery Services 421
17 Public Harms Unique to Satellite Spectrum Auctions 448
18 Keeping Competitors Out: Broadcast Regulation from 1927 to 1996 473
19 Regulatory Standards: The Effect of Broadcast Signals on Cable Television 499
20 Public Policy and Broadband Infrastructure 518
21 Public Interest Regulation in the Digital TV Era 543
22 Toward a Better Integration of Media Economics and Media Competition Policy 573
23 The Future of Television: Understanding Digital Economics 594
Contributors 617
Index 619
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