A Complete Guide to PivotTables: A Visual Approach

Overview

PivotTables are powerful data analysis tools, yet most Excel users dont use them to their fullest potential. A Complete Guide to PivotTables: A Visual Approach shows you why PivotTables are so versatile for data analysis and how you can leverage PivotTables to rapidly spot trends and make fast business decisions on mountains of data.

A series of step-by-step tutorials and plenty of sample business data will help you get productive with PivotTables quickly and easily. Whereas ...

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Overview

PivotTables are powerful data analysis tools, yet most Excel users dont use them to their fullest potential. A Complete Guide to PivotTables: A Visual Approach shows you why PivotTables are so versatile for data analysis and how you can leverage PivotTables to rapidly spot trends and make fast business decisions on mountains of data.

A series of step-by-step tutorials and plenty of sample business data will help you get productive with PivotTables quickly and easily. Whereas most books only devote a small section to PivotTables, this book covers everything about this important Excel feature. With his tremendous experience writing about Office and Excel for power users, Paul Cornell will teach you plenty about PivotTables.

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Editorial Reviews

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The Barnes & Noble Review
If Excel PivotTables bedevil you, you’re not alone. They confuse practically everyone. But if you need to analyze data, they’re indispensable. Paul Cornell will teach you exactly how to use them. And if you already know the basics, he’ll help you do things you didn’t know anyone could. Cornell’s taught PivotTables successfully to thousands of people, at Microsoft’s Office Power User Corner. Now it’s your turn.

You’ll start by learning what PivotTables are, what kinds of questions they can answer, and when to use them instead of crosstabs or other features. Simply and gently, Cornell guides you through the PivotTable wizard, translating its unfamiliar terminology into something more human. (Don’t worry about source data: he provides downloadable sample files.)

You’re already ahead of most Excel users, and you’ve just begun. Cornell illuminates PivotTable “components,” showing how to use them for deeper data analysis. To solidify your skills, you’ll walk through three real-world case studies. Next, Cornell turns to PivotCharts, which can reveal insights at a glance that you’d struggle to find in numeric data.

For many businesspeople, the “holy grail” of PivotTables is analyzing multidimensional data drawn from OLAP databases. Cornell covers that from start to finish -- beginning with a crystal-clear explanation of what multidimensional data is and how it differs from “ordinary” data. You’ll learn all the OLAP jargon you need, master the PivotTable menu’s OLAP-specific commands, create multidimensional data and use it for analysis, even create offline “cubes” you can take with you.

This book applies to PivotTables in any recent version of Excel; Cornell points out the (very manageable) differences. There’s even an introduction to programming these babies with VBA. Bill Camarda, from the April 2005 Read Only

Slashdot.org
If you have any need to analyze data in Excel, you must read this book. I learned so much more about PivotTables after I read it that they are now actually useful, rather than just being something I would occasionally try out. Every chapter is packed with excellent information in an easy-to-follow format.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590594322
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 11/5/2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 381,433
  • Product dimensions: 9.25 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.76 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul Cornell works at Microsoft on the documentation team for Microsoft Visual Studio Tools for the Microsoft Office system. He worked as an editor, writer, and columnist on the MSDN Office Developer Center and edited the Microsoft Office Visual Basic Language Reference. Cornell also founded the Power User Corner, on Microsoft Office Online, where he was a frequent contributor.
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Table of Contents

Introduction : pivottables are powerful!
Ch. 1 What are pivottables? 1
Ch. 2 Creating pivottables 39
Ch. 3 Working with pivottable components 81
Ch. 4 Using pivottables in the real world 135
Ch. 5 Working with pivotcharts 173
Ch. 6 Analyzing multidimensional data with pivottables 227
Ch. 7 Programming pivottables 269
App Pivottable differences between excel 2000, 2002, and 2003 323
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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2004

    think of SQL view

    Spreadsheets and SQL databases are represented as tables. That is, as rectangular grids of data. But in many ways, the common spreadsheet view is quite limited, though powerful within its context. Spreadsheet functions are often tied to specific cells as inputs. Then, interchanging two rows might cause the result to be different. A SQL view is more robust. Typically, you use data in a given column. The rows from which you take that data are selected based on criteria met by values in another column or columns. Hence, swapping 2 rows in a SQL table usually has no effect on an answer. In essence, this is what PivotTables offer. Cornell doesn't seem to describe it in such a fashion. He writes for a spreadsheet user who has no acquaintance with SQL. Certainly, this is a larger audience. But if you have a SQL background, then the idea behind PivotTables is easy to grasp. Most of the book deals with the mechanics of how to use PivotTables. Necessary, but secondary, once you realise what's going on.

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