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A Consumer's Guide to Medicines in Food: Nutraceuticals That Prevent and Treat Physical and Emotional Disorders
     

A Consumer's Guide to Medicines in Food: Nutraceuticals That Prevent and Treat Physical and Emotional Disorders

by Ruth Winter
 
One of the hottest and most controversial areas of research today concerns nutraceuticals. Many researchers believe that certain foods, vitamins, and other nutrients can prevent and treat a variety of common illnesses, ranging from heart disease and cancer to depression and anxiety. For example, major government, university, and industry scientific investigations are

Overview

One of the hottest and most controversial areas of research today concerns nutraceuticals. Many researchers believe that certain foods, vitamins, and other nutrients can prevent and treat a variety of common illnesses, ranging from heart disease and cancer to depression and anxiety. For example, major government, university, and industry scientific investigations are now underway to show:
— Substances from soybeans may help prevent breast and prostate cancer
— Virus-fighting vaccines can be administered in genetically engineered bananas
— Metals and vitamins may succeed in preventing or counteracting heart attacks
— A newly developed milk can ease the pain of arthritis
— A fatty acid can improve or maintain mental function
— Ancient Chinese herbs can ease hangovers and fight alcohol addiction

The term nutraceutical — any food substance that provides health benefits — is just now making a place in the medical field. In many research projects, nutrients are given in pharmaceutical doses, not in the usual recommended daily allowances. In other investigations, folk medicine recommendations are being evaluated scientifically, and many have already been found to have a sound therapeutic basis.

A Consumer's Guide to Medicines in Food lists the nutraceuticals currently being considered by researchers. Garlic is being studied for its anticancer, antibiotic properties. Milk thistle is being examined for its liver-protecting qualities. Quercetin is being investigated for its inflammation-suppressing abilities. Even green tea is the object of several major international scientific studies to determine its cancer-fightingpotential. Encyclopedic in scope, this book is based on the scientific research.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780517883495
Publisher:
Crown Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/23/1995
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
428
Product dimensions:
5.35(w) x 7.95(h) x 1.28(d)

Meet the Author

Ruth Winter, M.S., is also the author of A Dictionary of Medicines, A Consumner's Dictionary of Cosmetic Ingredients, A Consumer's Dictionary of Food Additives, and many others. She lives in Short Hills, New Jersey.

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