A Corner of White (The Colors of Madeleine Series #1)

( 13 )

Overview


The first in a rousing, funny, genre-busting trilogy from bestseller Jaclyn Moriarty!

This is a tale of missing persons. Madeleine and her mother have run away from their former life, under mysterious circumstances, and settled in a rainy corner of Cambridge (in our world).

Elliot, on the other hand, is in search of his father, who disappeared on the night his uncle was found dead. The talk in the town of Bonfire (in the Kingdom of Cello) is ...

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A Corner of White (The Colors of Madeleine Series #1)

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Overview


The first in a rousing, funny, genre-busting trilogy from bestseller Jaclyn Moriarty!

This is a tale of missing persons. Madeleine and her mother have run away from their former life, under mysterious circumstances, and settled in a rainy corner of Cambridge (in our world).

Elliot, on the other hand, is in search of his father, who disappeared on the night his uncle was found dead. The talk in the town of Bonfire (in the Kingdom of Cello) is that Elliot's dad may have killed his brother and run away with the Physics teacher. But Elliot refuses to believe it. And he is determined to find both his dad and the truth.

As Madeleine and Elliot move closer to unraveling their mysteries, they begin to exchange messages across worlds -- through an accidental gap that hasn't appeared in centuries. But even greater mysteries are unfolding on both sides of the gap: dangerous weather phenomena called "color storms;" a strange fascination with Isaac Newton; the myth of the "Butterfly Child," whose appearance could end the droughts of Cello; and some unexpected kisses...

A 2013 Boston Globe-Horn Fiction Honor Winner

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Two worlds coexist in this fascinating first book in Moriarty's Colors of Madeleine series. Bright, enigmatic 14-year-old Madeleine has moved to Cambridge, England, with her mother, where she receives home schooling from a small group of eccentric teachers, along with friends Jack and Belle. Madeleine accidentally makes contact with the fantastical Kingdom of Cello when she discovers a message poking out of a broken parking meter. She begins a written correspondence with 15-year-old Elliott, a boy living in the Cellian farming town of Bonfire, where Colors, "a kind of rogue subclass of the colors that we see," are known to attack and kill (Elliott's father was the alleged victim of a "Purple"), and the arrival of the fabled "Butterfly Child" is an auspicious sign. As the narrative alternates between Cello and Cambridge, some readers may be frustrated by the slow unfolding of events, yet moments of sharp observation, startling invention, and delightfully comic dialogue confirm Moriarty as a genre-bending author who gracefully weaves metaphysical questions into outwardly ordinary circumstances. Ages 12–up. Agent: Jill Grinberg Literary Management. (Apr.)
From the Publisher

"In this genre-blending feat of stylistic energy, Moriarty moves between  two palpably distinct worlds: the modern day environs of Cambridge,
England, and the eccentric kingdom of Cello, where the citizens are menaced by colors that attack from the sky and cause severe physical and mental injury. Fourteen-year-old Madeleine lives in Cambridge, having moved there when she and her mother ran away from their obscenely wealthy but unhappy lifestyle to adopt a considerably poorer but not all that happier one; now Madeleine has decided it is time to contact her father to come rescue them, especially since it seems that her mother may be seriously ill. Fifteen-year-old Elliot lives in Cello, and he,
too, is in search of his father, who may have been carried off by the nasty Purple that killed his uncle, or who may have just run off with a schoolteacher. When Madeleine finds a mysterious message on a slip of paper tucked in the base of a parking meter, she responds, and she and
Elliot develop a correspondence across worlds. The large and small pieces of their lives intermingle with surprising and beneficial effects, despite the fact that Madeleine doesn’t quite believe in Cello, and Elliot could be sentenced to death for not reporting the gap between the worlds. The plotting is as innovative and riveting as the world-making here, and the characters are drawn with the same rich dimensionality you find in Pratchett’s Discworld or one of Diana Wynne Jones’s fantasies. Moriarty’s wordsmithery likewise compares favorably with those two masters, delighting and surprising readers with quirky turns of phrase, evocative, synesthetic metaphors, and swift, effective shifts in register. Give this to readers who, like Madeleine, aren’t quite sure of their commitment to secondary worlds but like to spice their realities with a little fantasy nonetheless, as well as to those who love secondary worlds with a healthy helping of reality on the side." - Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books starred review

"In this lovely fantasy, two stories run parallel. Fourteen-year-old Madeleine lives in Cambridge, England, where she is adjusting to life without her dad. Elliot lives in the Kingdom of Cello, where his search for his dad is postponed by the deplorable state of crops at home. If it were not for the tiny portal in a parking meter, Madeleine and Elliot would not have started writing letters back and forth. The story is told through the teens’ communications and an omniscient narrator. This mix allows readers to know Madeleine and Elliot and their problems intimately, but it also gives them an aerial view of events, helps them meet the richly drawn secondary characters, and allows them to see the ingenious way in which the protagonists’ lives ultimately combine. Attacks by “Colors,” “living organisms: a kind of rogue subclass of the colors that we see when we look at a red apple or blue sky” keep the townspeople on edge, and Elliot wonders if his dad were killed during one of them. Mysteries abound. Is Madeleine’s mom’s strange behavior due to her inability to cope with poverty, or is something else going on? Why doesn’t Madeleine’s dad answer her letter, and is she somehow to blame for his absence? Ultimately, this is a story of two teenagers helping each other figure out their places in their respective worlds." Jennifer Prince, School Library Journal starred review

"Australian author Moriarty, best known for her Ashbury-Brookfield series (including The Year of Secret Assignments, rev. 3/04, and The Ghosts of Ashbury High, rev. 7/10), here embarks on a new series and a new genre. Fourteen-year-old Madeleine has moved to Cambridge, England, with her mother; they’ve run away (somewhat mysteriously) from Madeleine’s father and a life of extreme wealth. Fifteen-year-old Elliot Baranski lives in the Kingdom of Cello, where Colors are living organisms that can kill people, where seasons change at the drop of a hat, and where “Wandering Hostiles” want to overthrow the royal family. People stopped moving between Cello and Madeleine’s world hundreds of years ago, but Elliot has found a tiny “crack” between the two places and has begun a correspondence with Madeleine. While Elliot learned about Madeleine’s world in school, she thinks Cello is an imaginary land he’s invented. Moriarty is the queen of epistolary stories, and her fans will find the teens’ letters a familiar entrée into this highly unusual fantasy. Like Madeleine, readers will be initially baffled by, but will ultimately believe in, Elliot’s world. Moriarty’s story comes across as matter-of-fact yet curious, topped off with a strong dose of humor (think Margaret Mahy). As always, her irresistible characters help readers navigate a tantalizingly complex plot that will leave them eagerly awaiting the next book." - Jennifer M. Brabander, The Hornbook Magazine starred review

Praise for Jaclyn Moriarty

"Moriarty has found a winning formula for her thoroughly enjoyable, deceptively simple Ashbury High novels: She takes a clever, sophisticated epistolary format, adds sparkling, effervescent wit, and applies them to a mash-up of literary genres." -- Horn Book, starred review

"[A]n exhilarating pace, irrepressible characters, and a screwball humor that will easily attract teens, many of whom will yearn for madcap adventures and unshakably devoted friends like these." -- Booklist, starred review

"Who can resist Moriarty's biting humor?" -- Kirkus Reviews

From The Critics
Praise for Jaclyn Moriarty

"Moriarty has found a winning formula for her thoroughly enjoyable, deceptively simple Ashbury High novels: She takes a clever, sophisticated epistolary format, adds sparkling, effervescent wit, and applies them to a mash-up of literary genres." -- Horn Book, starred review

"[A]n exhilarating pace, irrepressible characters, and a screwball humor that will easily attract teens, many of whom will yearn for madcap adventures and unshakably devoted friends like these." -- Booklist, starred review

"Who can resist Moriarty's biting humor?" -- Kirkus Reviews

VOYA - Rebecca O'Neil
Fourteen-year-old Madeleine Tully lives in Cambridge, England, after she and her mother flee from high-society life with her father. Elliot Baranski, fifteen, lives in the Kingdom of Cello, where his own father has mysteriously disappeared after a "Color Attack" that also killed his uncle. After accidentally discovering a crack between their worlds that allows letters through, the two begin corresponding about their problems: Madeleine's poverty, her mother's illness, her friends Jack and Belle, her research of Isaac Newton; and Elliot's discovery of the Butterfly Child (a fairy creature said to improve crops), the effects of Colors in Cello, and the antics of his loyal friends. Moriarty's fans will recognize her flair for epistolary storytelling and quirky characters. Humorous asides and large doses of whimsy create a breezy tone that makes moments of romance and violence unexpectedly powerful. Madeleine's insistence that Cello is Elliot's fabrication ("I have issues with your world-building") provides a particularly funny, metafiction twist to the parallel-universe storyline. As the first book in a new series, The Colors of Madeleine, this book sets up a lot of backstory, and the slow beginning may deter some readers. Those who persevere, however, will be rewarded with a clever, layered story in which every seemingly innocuous detail plays a part, and the ending satisfies while opening brand-new doors for the sequel. School and public libraries will want to purchase this one. Reviewer: Rebecca O'Neil
Children's Literature - Natalie Gurr
Madeleine's world has shifted. She has gone from a life of travel and wealth, to living in a small flat with her mother in Cambridge. Madeleine is not sure what is true anymore and she is not sure where she belongs; but everything begins to change when she serendipitously finds a note in a parking meter and she responds. Elliot lives in the land of Cello. A land of magic and some advanced technology, where Colors can bring peace or destruction. His father went missing a year ago, the supposed victim of a ferocious Purple, but Elliot has not given up hope yet. A crack appears, something that has not happened in years, and he finds Madeleine's note, and a correspondence begins. Across worlds, the events of their lives begin to intervene and weave together. Secrets are uncovered and friendships are discovered. Lyrically written, Moriarty tells a story of magic, intrigue, and finding purpose in life. Madeleine and Elliott are likable and believable. While there is a magical element, Moriarty has written a very human story with realistic feelings and experiences. Excellent read for those who love contemporary situations within an imaginative world. Reviewer: Natalie Gurr
Kirkus Reviews
Another one of a kind from the inimitable Moriarty, this time, a barely epistolary fantasy series opener unlike anything else out there. Fourteen-year-old Madeleine lives in Cambridge, England, with her zany mother in uncertain circumstances, having run away from their fabulously privileged international existence. Meanwhile, Elliot lives in Bonfire, The Farms, Cello, a parallel reality that might be the real fairyland (although that's never explicitly stated, and this version seems utterly unlike most versions of fairyland). Through a crack between their worlds, they begin exchanging letters, although more of the novel is about one or the other of these two appealing characters than about their moments of intersection. Elliot wants to find his father, who disappeared mysteriously, while Madeleine wants to be found by hers and is also navigating friendship and her mother's deteriorating health. Moriarty's trademark wit and whimsy are on full display, with zingy dialogue that feels right if not entirely realistic and bizarre characters living unexpected lives that manage to be mundane and delightful at the same time. By the end, Madeleine's story feels somewhat resolved, but Elliot's has turned an unexpected corner that will bring their worlds much closer and bring readers more mystery and humor in the next volume. Quirky, charming, funny, sad: another winner from this always-surprising author. (Fantasy. 12 & up)
School Library Journal
Gr 6–9—In this lovely fantasy, two stories run parallel. Fourteen-year-old Madeleine lives in Cambridge, England, where she is adjusting to life without her dad. Elliot lives in the Kingdom of Cello, where his search for his dad is postponed by the deplorable state of crops at home. If it were not for the tiny portal in a parking meter, Madeleine and Elliot would not have started writing letters back and forth. The story is told through the teens' communications and an omniscient narrator. This mix allows readers to know Madeleine and Elliot and their problems intimately, but it also gives them an aerial view of events, helps them meet the richly drawn secondary characters, and allows them to see the ingenious way in which the protagonists' lives ultimately combine. Attacks by "Colors," "living organisms: a kind of rogue subclass of the colors that we see when we look at a red apple or blue sky" keep the townspeople on edge, and Elliot wonders if his dad were killed during one of them. Mysteries abound. Is Madeleine's mom's strange behavior due to her inability to cope with poverty, or is something else going on? Why doesn't Madeleine's dad answer her letter, and is she somehow to blame for his absence? Ultimately, this is a story of two teenagers helping each other figure out their places in their respective worlds.—Jennifer Prince, Buncombe County Public Libraries, NC
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780545397360
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/1/2013
  • Series: Colors of Madeleine Series , #1
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 130,155
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • Lexile: 800L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author


Jaclyn Moriarty grew up in Sydney, Australia, with 4 sisters, 1 brother, 2 dogs, and 12 chickens. She studied law at the University of Sydney, Yale, and Cambridge, and worked as an entertainment lawyer before she wrote the Ashbury High novels, including THE YEAR OF SECRET ASSIGNMENTS, THE MURDER OF BINDY MACKENZIE, and THE GHOSTS OF ASHBURY HIGH. She still lives in Sydney, with her little boy, Charlie.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 13 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 26, 2013

    The plot is unique, to say the least. I mean it doesn't tackle a

    The plot is unique, to say the least. I mean it doesn't tackle a completely new idea (because what book does?) yet it manages to make it different enough that I can't seem to compare it to anything else I've read. Two worlds linked together, two people discovering it, that's an basic plot that many authors have tackled but it didn't have the star-crossed lovers and the new world was extremely unique. So unique that during the beginning I was kind of scratching my head and thinking, "What the...?" After I got into the book, albeit still a little confused, everything seemed to fall into place and I found myself in awe of it. So fair warning to all those who buy this book, don't get discouraged by its unique qualities! It is totally worthwhile in the end.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 10, 2013

    ***Review posted at The Eater of Books! blog*** A Corner of Whi

    ***Review posted at The Eater of Books! blog***

    A Corner of White by Jaclyn Moriarty
    Book One of The Colors of Madeleine series
    Publisher: Arthur A. Levine Books
    Publication Date: April 1, 2013
    Rating: 2 stars
    Source: ARCycling

    Summary (from Goodreads):

    The first in a rousing, funny, genre-busting trilogy from bestseller Jaclyn Moriarty!

    This is a tale of missing persons. Madeleine and her mother have run away from their former life, under mysterious circumstances, and settled in a rainy corner of Cambridge (in our world).

    Elliot, on the other hand, is in search of his father, who disappeared on the night his uncle was found dead. The talk in the town of Bonfire (in the Kingdom of Cello) is that Elliot's dad may have killed his brother and run away with the Physics teacher. But Elliot refuses to believe it. And he is determined to find both his dad and the truth.

    As Madeleine and Elliot move closer to unraveling their mysteries, they begin to exchange messages across worlds -- through an accidental gap that hasn't appeared in centuries. But even greater mysteries are unfolding on both sides of the gap: dangerous weather phenomena called "color storms;" a strange fascination with Isaac Newton; the myth of the "Butterfly Child," whose appearance could end the droughts of Cello; and some unexpected kisses...


    What I Liked:

    The characters were likable. Elliot is interesting, as he is desperate to find his father, while trying to get his father's shop back, and capture a Butterfly Child. Madeleine is... weird. It seems like she is supposed to have some depth to her, but I found her a dry and boring protagonist. I really like Jack, because he is super sweet and empathetic. I was never a huge fan of Belle, but she contributed nicely to the story.

    The contrast between the Kingdom of Cello and the real World is nicely written. I liked reading about Cello (even though I was very confused most of the time), because it was not what I expected. It's definitely not your typical kingdom. The Princess columns were... weird, but interesting.


    What I Did Not Like:

    I am going to be very honest: I was so confused throughout this entire book. I ALMOST did not finish this book, which is rare for me - once I start a book, no matter what, I finish it. I really did not understand what was what most of the time. I understand the difference between the two worlds, and that Madeleine and Elliot were communicating through a crack between the worlds. I understood that Madeleine is basically a nomad - she cannot stay in one place for very long. Or she is always running away, for attention? See, even that I do not understand. Why is she always running away? This is not really expounded upon in the novel. She has daddy issues? Her parents are never really invested in her, even though they are filthy rich? I feel like I can infer that, but I wish the author could have more subtly sneaked an explanation in there.

    I really do not understand the "Colors" bit of Cello. So, they are monsters? Or are they colors that have an adverse affect on people? Are the people of Cello afraid of colors? What exactly are Colors?! Is it not clear, and therefore, every time there was a Color attack, I was extremely confused. What exactly do the Colors do? One type physically hurts people, another mentally hurts people. So, how does the whole Color thing work? I wish I knew.

    I still don't understand the obsession with Newton, Byron, Lovelace, or whoever. So, do Jack and Belle believe in reincarnation? Or is that supposed to be some sort of character reference that just didn't make sense? A good portion of the book is spent harping on those historical figures, and I really do not understand the significance of them.

    The ending kind of just flew in my face. There were so many elements of the book that needed to be wrapped up really quickly. This book really dragged on, and then the ending was like BOOM! So many things needed to be resolved in like, a couple of chapters.. It did not work for me. Elliot's father situation, Madeleine's mother, Madeleine's resolution with her father (which, by the way, I feel like we never really got), The Butterfly Child deal... it felt so rushed. 

    Romance: no love triangle - sort of. But, the romance was SO lacking in this book. From the last line of the synopsis, you'd think the romance would be dynamic and prominent, right? On Elliot's side AND Madeleine's side, not really. In fact, I don't really understand Elliot's romance, and there wasn't really a resolution to Madeleine's romance. 

    Finally (I could go on, but I won't), I was bored. A lot. It took me several attempts to continue reading, and to finish. The author's writing style is really dry, so I'm not really seeing how the publisher is saying that this book is "funny". Because I didn't really catch on to the humor. Which is sad.


    Would I Recommend It:

    Not really. I'm sorry, but this book is not for me. The protagonist is like, fourteen. Or fifteen. I think Elliot is fifteen, and Madeleine is fourteen. Or something like that. Either way, not mature enough for me.


    Rating:

    2 stars. Not the best "fantasy" meets contemporary book out there. Definitely meant for tweens. I really can't understand how the overall rating for this book is so high! But that's just me.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2013

    GREAT!

    I really liked this book! I was hooked on it when i started it, i couldn't put it down!:) i can't wait until the second book!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 1, 2014

    Jaclyn Moriarty's style of writing mixes lyrical prose with unex

    Jaclyn Moriarty's style of writing mixes lyrical prose with unexpected similies and metaphors, demonstrating an unusual way of looking at and describing the world. Her characters seem straightforward and typical, though lovable and interesting, but as you float effortlessly through the story, Moriarty blindsides you softly with a plot twist or character detail you weren't expecting. Her imagination makes the fantastical world of Elliot as believable as the everyday world in which Madeline lives. Characters have flaws, deep flaws, as well as good qualities and you find yourself disliking the flaw, but still sympathizing with the character's plight. It is not a simple, easy read in which you're left with a good story for entertainment and not much else. This is the kind of story you sample, bite-by-bite, enjoying each morsel as much as the first, thinking you're eating a small, delightful snack, but at the end, you've devoured an entire meal that leaves you both full and hungry for the next installment.

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  • Posted October 10, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    A Corner of  White is a fantasy that has a contemporary feel to

    A Corner of  White is a fantasy that has a contemporary feel to it also and focuses on the the crossover between two worlds," the Kingdom of Cello and the World." Madeline lives in Cambridge England and Elliot lives in Cello.  The colors represent dangerous creatures in the Kingdom of Cello.  Elliot and Madeline exchange letters through the "crack" between their worlds, and gradually form a friendship, trying to help each other solve their problems.  There are peculiar characters and the plot is rather eccentric, having a fairy tale feel to it, but then it kind of hopped here and there like a rabbit, but never really seemed to have a clear path, making it rather difficult to stay focused.  It was rather slow-paced, yet did have its intriguing moments also.  Though I wasn't crazy about it, I do think it is something that fantasy lovers, specifically fans of Alice in Wonderland type stories, might enjoy.   

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  • Posted October 6, 2013

    This book was different. I can't decide if I liked it or not. I

    This book was different. I can't decide if I liked it or not. It was kind of weird and kind of confusing, but at the same time, I liked the characters and the interweaving of our world with another one. The writing was distinct, but kind of strange. The plot was interesting, yet kind of boring. I didn't find the humor that was promised in the synopsis, but I cared about the characters and how their stories wrapped up.

    To be honest, I don't know what to think. It was such a strange book that I'm not sure if it would appeal to middle grade and young adult readers. I'm not sure of a whole lot with this book, so I'm going right down the middle and giving it 3 stars. I think it's worth a try, and it has a lot of rave reviews, so it might just be a personal preference thing. But get it from the library just to be on the safe side.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2013

    I love this book!!!

    This book has such a great twist and takes turns at any second! You can tell that there will be another book because the author ends this book with a cliff hanger. This is a totally recommended book!

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  • Posted May 16, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    A Corner of White is the newest book by best selling authorJacly

    A Corner of White is the newest book by best selling authorJaclyn Moriarty. I was drawn in by the publisher's review of the book that I read online. It talked of a book that is "rousing, funny, genre-busting" where the characters exchange messages across worlds -- through an accidental gap" and hinted at "even greater mysteries...unfolding on both sides of the gap". That was enough to entice me into reading the book, and I have to say, I'm glad that I gave it the time. 




    The two main characters in this book, Madeleine and Elliot, live in two separate worlds. Madeleine lives in Cambridge, UK, in our world. Elliot, however, lives in Bonfire, The Farms, in the Kingdom of Cello. Both characters are wrestling with family issues, and issues regarding their place in their worlds when they start communicating through a gap that exists between worlds. Sounds like a typical young adult fantasy book, right? Here is where the genre-busting part comes in, though. This book is as much a coming-of-age book as it is a fantasy book. 




    There was so much about this book that really drew me in as I read it. Not being familiar with Moriarty's work in general, I had no preconceived idea about what a character in her book is typically like. What I found, though, is that her characters were all kinds of things. They were quirky, like Jimmy the deputy who can solve missing person cases with an uncanny success rate, or Holly, Madeleine's mom who is hooked on a quiz show, but cannot answer a single question correctly. Some of the characters made me laugh, like Jack and his fascination with Byron the poet, some tugged at my heart-strings, like Elliot's cousin Corrie-Lynn. In fact, there were a number of top notch characters in this story. 




    Moriarty's choice to include two separate worlds as the backdrop for her story was the stroke of a master. At times things between Cello and Cambridge seemed so similar, and yet they were completely different in most ways. Yes one world, Cambridge, is rooted in reality and the other, Cello, in fantasy, but there is more to it than that. Both worlds contained things that seemed as normal as apple pie, and things that were distinctly different from most people's experience. Both contained things that seemed grounded in reality, but also things that were unexplainable, mystical, or even magical. One thing I really liked was the way that Elliot's friends, although they were living in the "fantasy" world had mostly "real world" characteristics, while Madeleine's friends, living in the "real" world of Cambridge had characteristics that one would normally expect to find in a "fantasy" world. 




    Also included in the book were a number of plot devices that really helped to round out the story. My favorite was Moriarty's use of the correspondence between Elliot and Madeleine to illustrate the differences between worlds and highlight important factors. Another was Madeleine's fascination with Isaac Newton. 




    If there was anything that might be a bit off about the book, it would be the beginning. I know a number of people that found it either slow or confusing. In fact, in most of the reveiws that I read where the reader did not finish the book, their complaints about the story would have been answered if they had kept reading until the end. Although the slow start did not affect me personally, the fact that it kept some readers from finishing a book that, judging from their comments, they would have liked, is a negative. 




    I liked the way that Moriarty developed the story slowly allowing me to get familiar with the characters, the Kingdom of Cello, and Madeleine's world in a way that built a growing appreciation of them all. I also liked the way that she did not reveal everything at once. It was like pulling apart a set of nested boxes, and finally getting to the present in the middle. And what was the present in this case? I would have to say it was the ending which was surprising....both in it's revelation and it's appropriateness. It definitely left me wanting more. 




    All in all this was a deliciously strange book whose best qualities were the voice of the narrative, the complexity of the characters, and the crafting of the end. It is a top notch set up for the trilogy which is certain to get a number of readers on board and highly anticipating the next installment. I give the book 4.5 stars and am definitely putting it on my "Recommend" list.




    I huge thanks to PanMacMillan Australia and Netgalley for making this book available to me in exchange for my review

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  • Posted April 28, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Two worlds, the Kingdom of Cello and Our World. Very different b

    Two worlds, the Kingdom of Cello and Our World. Very different but linked by a crack in a parking meter and a sculpture made of cement and a broken TV. Madeline in one world and Cody in the other. Both have problems...really BIG problems. A crazy Mom, a missing Dad, Color attacks, fickle friends..but somehow, through it all, they manage to help each other. What defines "Friendship"? Madeline and Cody do a fair job of showing us what is really at the core of a friendship, and how friends really care about each other, even if they can't meet face to face. A wonderful blend of fantasy and pain that is oh too real.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    When I first started this book I wasn't sure I liked it. But, I

    When I first started this book I wasn't sure I liked it. But, I have read all of Jaclyn Moriarty's books and I knew enough to give it a chance. Moriarty's books have a way of starting off slow and then before you hit the 100th page suddenly everything that seemed insignificant is not anymore and from there on out the book will make you laugh and cry and wish that it would never end. This book combines the real world with a fantasy one in a way that makes you believe in magic once again. Moriarty is an astute observer or human nature and so she can write her characters in such a way that you don’t doubt that they are out there somewhere, living their lives.
    The book itself is magic, within every page and every character. It would be exceptionally difficult to be disappointed by this book by the time you finish it. I would recommend it to realistic fiction and fantasy readers alike.

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  • Posted April 3, 2013

    A Corner of White: The Colors of Madeleine Book One Jaclyn Moria

    A Corner of White: The Colors of Madeleine Book One
    Jaclyn Moriarty
    ISBN: 978-0-545-39736-0
    April 2013
    4 Stars
    *This is an uncorrected galley I received from NetGalley*
    After Madeleine and her mother run away from their previous lives to Cambridge (our world) she forms a relationship with a boy, Elliot, from the Kingdom of Cello. Elliot’s father is missing under mysterious circumstances and Madeleine wants nothing more than for her father to rescue her from her new dreary life. Their correspondence is forbidden but as they pass notes back and forth through the “crack” they find that their mysteries are being solved with their unique experiences including assignments about Isaac Newton and the magical Butterfly Child. With the increasing “color attacks” in the Kingdom of Cello and Madeleine’s mother’s strange behavior they have to depend on each other to find answers quickly.
    I am only saying this to explain why this took me longer to read than it should have and doesn’t reflect upon the rating I am giving. The formatting was really rough and made it difficult at times to read. If the story wasn’t as good as it is I don’t think I could have continued.
    My one complaint is that there were times in the beginning that I found myself a little confused and going back to make sure I had a grasp on the material. There are a lot of characters to keep straight and when you are flipping from one world to another more clarity can be required. I would have to read a finished copy to see if maybe the formatting had something to do with this. Otherwise I only have good things to say. The plot is amazing! The story lines of the two protagonists might not be entirely original but the author puts a unique spin on it. Even though some of the things they come into contact with are tough problems that the reader may be able to relate to, it’s told in a way that’s easy to digest. The characters are a lot of fun and I got emotionally involved in their stories. The best part of this one for me is the magical atmosphere the author created. If there was a way to get to the Kingdom of Cello I would be on my way.
    I truly recommend this one no matter if you are a young adult or adult. It has a little something for everyone and is like a vacation and a great story all in one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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