A Country Without Strikes: A Visit to the Compulsory Arbitration Court of New Zealand [NOOK Book]

Overview

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing ...

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A Country Without Strikes: A Visit to the Compulsory Arbitration Court of New Zealand

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NOOK Book (eBook - Digitized from 1900 volume)
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Overview

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR'd book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940023848709
  • Publisher: Doubleday, Page
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1900 volume

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III. "better Committees Than Mobs." One of the great sayings of Kant was that we should "organise the world." The compulsory arbitration of New Zealand organises its industrial world. Its corner-stone is its invitation to labourers and capitalists to unite within themselves that they may be united with each other. One continually sees paragraphs like this in the newspapers of New Zealand: "The iron workers of Auckland have unanimously agreed to form a union under the Conciliation and Arbitration Act, to be called The Federated Iron Workers Union. The union will embrace the boiler-makers, farriers and general smiths." And often, though less frequently, one sees similar items announcing the organisation of the employers. At the last accounts there had been one hundred and forty trade-unions and unions of employers formed to take advantage 61 of the Compulsory Arbitration law. More are coming into line. Compulsory arbitration proceeds on the teaching of experience that in labour troubles it is better to have committees than mobs to deal with, even mobs of one. Of all mobs there have never been any more dangerous than an individual beside himself with passion and greed, defying all laws of God and man that he may have his own way. Everything that can be done by the New Zealand law to encourage these organisations is done. Manufacturers stay outside the organisation of their associates in the hope of escaping arbitration, only to find themselves as easily brought before the bar as the others. Organisations of workingmen which are not registered under this law cannot hold land for their collective purposes and cannot sue defaulting members. Of course they cannot vote formembers of the Boards of Conciliation and Courts of Arbitration, and yet, when any distu...
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