A Cubism Reader: Documents and Criticism, 1906-1914 / Edition 2

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Overview

With radical formal innovations that scandalized the European art world, cubism revolutionized modern art and opened the path toward pure abstraction. Documenting the first heady years of this profoundly influential movement, A Cubism Reader presents the most comprehensive collection of cubist primary sources ever compiled for English-language publication.
            This definitive anthology covers the historical genesis of cubism from 1906 to 1914, with documents that range from manifestos and poetry to exhibition prefaces and reviews to articles that address the cultural, political, and philosophical issues related to the movement. Most of the texts Mark Antliff and Patricia Leighten have selected are from French sources, but their inclusion of carefully culled German, English, Czech, Italian, and Spanish documents speaks to the international reach of cubist art and ideas. Equally wide-ranging are the writers represented—a group that includes Guillaume Apollinaire, Gertrude Stein, Jean Metzinger, Albert Gleizes, Fernand Léger, Francis Picabia, André Salmon, Raymond Duchamp-Villon, Henri Le Fauconnier, and many others.
            These diverse selections—unabridged and freshly translated—represent a departure from the traditional view of cubism as shaped almost exclusively by Picasso and Braque. Augmented by Antliff and Leighten’s insightful commentary on each entry, as well as many of the articles’ original illustrations, A Cubism Reader ultimately broadens the established history of the movement by examining its monumental contributions from a variety of contemporary perspectives.

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Editorial Reviews

Australian Literary Review
A Cubism Reader confirms the lingering influence of symbolism on the work and thought of the early moderns with its stress on the allusive and the suggestive, the fragmentary and the fugitive.

— Patrick McCaughey

Gill Perry

“Antliff and Leighten have assembled an unprecedented range of primary texts and documents on the history of the cubist movement, including writings by artists, critics, philosophers, politicians, and literary figures. This anthology offers a rich, nuanced picture of the broader cubist movement that encompasses its literary roots, artistic sub-groupings, historiographies, and cultural and political ramifications. The sheer scale of this remarkable collection, and the editors’ insightful commentaries and contextual material on each text, make it a uniquely comprehensive and flexible resource for ongoing study and research. A Cubism Reader has extended the boundaries of art historical study, providing the discipline with an invaluable resource for students and scholars of cubism and early modernism.”
Linda Dalrymple Henderson

“This is an unprecedented treasure trove of sorely needed texts central to the history of cubism—many of which had been difficult to find or to make accessible to students in translation. Moreover, A Cubism Reader makes a double contribution, since Antliff and Leighten’s introduction and commentaries provide incisive interpretations and new insights.”
Australian Literary Review - Patrick McCaughey

"A Cubism Reader confirms the lingering influence of symbolism on the work and thought of the early moderns with its stress on the allusive and the suggestive, the fragmentary and the fugitive."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226021096
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 8/1/2008
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 608
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Mark Antliff and Patricia Leighten are professors in the Department of Art, Art History & Visual Studies at Duke University. They are coauthors of Cubism and Culture.
 

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Table of Contents


List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Documents

1. “L’appel de 1906,” pamphlet published by the Abbaye de Creteil, 1906
Commentary 
2. Martin-Mamy, “Chronique du mois,” Le Feu (September 1907): 162–65
Commentary 
3. Gelett Burgess, “Th e Wild Men of Paris,” Th e Architectural Record ([New York,] May 1910): 400–414
Commentary
4. Guillaume Apollinaire, “Georges Braque,” preface, Exposition Georges Braque, 9–28 November 1908, Galerie Kahnweiler, 28, rue Vignon, Paris
Commentary
5. Louis Vauxcelles, “Exposition Braque. Chez Kahnweiler, 28 rue Vignon,” Gil Blas, 14 November 1908
Commentary
6. Gertrude Stein, “Picasso” (1909), Camera Work ([New York,] August 1912): 29–30
Commentary
7. Elie Faure, “Preface,” Exposition de peinture moderne (Societe de peinture moderne), Salle Bouldieu, Rouen, 20 December 1909–20 January 1910, pp. 1–2
Commentary
8. Jean Metzinger, “La feerie,” Ile Sonnante (April 1910): 152
Commentary
9. Léon Werth, “Exposition Picasso,” La Phalange (20 June 1910): 728–30
Commentary
10. Henri le Fauconnier, “Das Kunstwerk,” Neue Kunstlervereinigung München, Moderne Galerie Thannhauser, Munich, September 1910
Commentary
11. Jean Metzinger, “Note sur la peinture,” Pan (October–November 1910): 49–52
Commentary
12. Roger Allard, “Au Salon d’Automne de Paris,” L’Art Libre ([Lyons,] November 1910): 441–43
Commentary
13. Jacques Rivière, “Exposition André Lhote. (Galerie Druet),” La Nouvelle Revue Française, no. 24 (July–December 1910): 806–8
Commentary
14. Henri Guilbeaux, “Exposition Pablo Picasso (Vollard, rue Laffi tte),” Les Hommes du Jour (7 January 1911): n.p.
Commentary
15. J. C. Holl, “Une enquête sur l’orientation da la peinture moderne. Part 2: Le Fauconnier,” La Revue du Temps Present (2 May 1911): 466–67
Commentary
16. Marius de Zayas, “Pablo Picasso,” América, Revista Mensual Illustrada ([New York,] May 1911): 363–65
Commentary
17. Cyril Berger, “Chez Metzi,” Paris-Journal, 29 May 1911, p. 3
Commentary
18. Roger Allard, “Sur quelques peintres,” Les Marches du Sud-Ouest (June 1911): 57–64
Commentary
19. Jean Metzinger, “Cubisme et tradition,” Paris-Journal, 18 August 1911, p. 5
Commentary
20. Ardengo Soffici, “Picasso e Braque,” La Voce ([Florence,] 24 August 1911): 635–37
Commentary
21. Albert Gleizes, “Art et ses représentants,” La Revue Indépendante (September 1911): 161–72
Commentary
22. La Palette [pseud. of André Salmon], “Pablo Picasso,” Paris-Journal, 21 September 1911
Commentary
23. La Palette [pseud. of Andre Salmon], “Jean Metzinger,” Paris-Journal, 3 October 1911
Commentary
24. Urbain Gohier, “Notre peinture,” Le Journal, 10 October 1911
Commentary
25. Henri Guilbeaux, “Le cubisme et MM. Urbain Gohier et Apollinaire,” Les Hommes du Jour (11 November 1911): n.p. [8]
Commentary
26. La Palette [pseud. of Andre Salmon], “Georges Braque,” Paris-Journal, 13 October 1911
Commentary
27. La Palette [pseud. of Andre Salmon], “Andre Derain,” Paris-Journal, 25 October 1911
Commentary
28. Maurice Verne, “Un jour de pluie chez M. Bergson,” L’Intransigeant, 26 November 1911
Commentary
29. Albert Gleizes, “A propos du Salon d’Automne,” Les Bandeaux d’Or ([Arras,] November 1911): 42–51
Commentary
30. Rene Blum, “Preface,” Exposition d’art contemporain (Societe normande de peinture moderne), Galerie d’Art Ancien et d’Art Contemporain, Paris, 20 November–16 December 1911, p. 1
Commentary
31. Jean Metzinger, “Alexandre Mercereau,” Vers et Prose (October–December 1911): 122–29
Commentary
32. La Palette [pseud. of Andre Salmon], “Courrier des ateliers: Exposition probable,” Paris-Journal, 21 January 1912, pp. 4–5
Commentary
33. Olivier Hourcade [pseud. of Olivier Bag], “La tendance de la peinture contemporaine,” La Revue de France et des Pays Français (February 1912): 35–41
Commentary
34. “Lettre D’Andre Mare a Maurice Marinot,” 20 February 1912 (collection Mme. Mare-Vene, Paris)
Commentary
35. Maurice Princet, “Preface: Robert Delaunay,” Les Peintres R. Delaunay, Marie Laurencin, Galerie Barbazanges, Fauburg Saint-Honore, Paris, 28 February–13 March 1912
Commentary
36. Olivier Hourcade [pseud. of Olivier Bag], “Enquete sur le cubisme,” L’Action (25 February, [10 March?], 17 March, and 24 March 1912)
Commentary
37. Jacques Riviere, “Sur la tendance actuelle de la peinture,” Revue d’Europe et d’Amérique (1 March 1912): 384–406
Commentary
38. Pierre Dumont, “Les arts: Les Independants,” Les Hommes du Jour (part 1: 6 April 1912, n.p.; part 2: 13 April 1912, n.p.; part 3: 20 April 1912, n.p.)
Commentary
39. Jacques de Gachons, “La peinture d’apres-demain (?),” Je Sais Tout! (15 April 1912)
Commentary
40. Jacques Nayral [pseud. of Jacques Huot], “Preface,” Exposicio d’art cubista, Galeries J. Dalmau, Barcelona, 20 April–10 May 1912, pp. 1–7
Commentary
41. Olivier Hourcade [pseud. of Olivier Bag], “Le mouvement pictoral: Vers une ecole francaise de peinture,” La Revue de France et des Pays Français (June 1912): 254–58
Commentary
42. Elie Faure, “Preface,” Troisieme exposition de la Societe normande de peinture moderne, Rouen, 15 June–15 July 1912, pp. 2–4
Commentary
43. Maurice Raynal, “Preface,” Troisieme exposition de la Societe normande de peinture moderne, Rouen, 15 June–15 July 1912, pp. 9–11
Commentary
44. Maurice Raynal, “Conception et vision,” Gil Blas, 29 August 1912
Commentary
45. “M. Lampue s’Indigne Contre le Salon d’Automne,” Le Journal, 5 October 1912, p. 1
Commentary
46. Rene Blum, “Preface, Salon de ‘la Section d’or,’ ” Galerie de la Boetie, 64 bis, Paris, rue de La Boetie, 10–30 October 1912, pp. 1–2
Commentary
47. La Section d’Or. Numéro Spécial Consacré à l’Exposition de la “Section d’Or,” vol. 1, no. 1 (9 October 1912). Redacteur: M. Pierre Dumont. Secretaire de la Redaction: Pierre Reverdy. Guillaume Apollinaire, “Jeunes peintres ne vous frappez pas!,” 1–2; Maurice Raynal, “L’Exposition de la ‘Section d’Or,’ ” 2–5; G. Buff et, “Impressionisme musical,” 5; Pierre Reverdy, “A un pauvre ecoeure,” 6; Marc Bresil, “La revue de la presse et des livres,” 6–7
Commentary
48. Lan-Pu-He, “Cubist Bar,” Fantasio, 15 October 1912, p. 195
Commentary
49. Pierre Lampue, “Lettre ouverte a M. Berard, sous-secretaire d’Etat aux Beaux-Arts,” Mercure de France (16 October 1912): 894–95 
355 / Commentary 356
50. Andre Salmon, “Histoire anecdotique du cubisme,” in La jeune peinture française (Paris: Societe des Trente, Albert Messein, 1912), 41–61 
357 / Commentary 367
51. Andre Salmon, “La peinture feminine au XXe siecle,” in La jeune peinture française, 111 and 114–18
Commentary
52. Louis Vauxcelles, “La ‘jeune peinture francaise,’ ” Gil Blas, 21 October 1912
Commentary
53. La Palette [pseud. of Andre Salmon], “Robert Delaunay,” Paris-Journal, 1 November 1912, p. 4
Commentary
54. Henri le Fauconnier, “La sensibilite moderne et le tableau,” in Moderne Kunstkring (Musee Municipal [Stedelijk], Amsterdam, 6 October–7 November 1912), 17–27
Commentary
55. “Debats Parlementaires,” Journal Offi ciel de la Chambre des Députés (3 December 1912): 2924–26
Commentary
56. Max Goth [pseud. of Maximilien Gauthier], “L’Art decoratif au Salon d’Automne,” Les Hommes du Jour (26 December 1912): n.p. 
Commentary
57. Albert Gleizes and Jean Metzinger, Du “Cubisme” (Paris: Eugene Figuiere, [27 December] 1912)
Commentary
58. Henriquez-Phillipe, “Le cubisme devant les artistes,” Les Annales Politiques et Litteraires (July–December 1912): 473–75
Commentary
59. Guillaume Apollinaire, “Realite, peinture pure,” Der Sturm ([Berlin,] December 1912)
Commentary
60. Albert Gleizes, “La tradition et le cubisme,” Montjoie! (1 and 2 February 1913)
Commentary
61. Guillaume Apollinaire, “Die moderne Malerei,” Der Sturm ([Berlin,] February 1913): 272
Commentary
62. Guillaume Apollinaire, Les peintres cubistes: Méditations esthétiques (Paris: Eugene Figuere [17 March], 1913)
Commentary
63. Les Compagnons de l’Action d’Art, “Monument du poete Oscar Wilde par EPSTEIN,” broadside distributed with L’Action d’Art (15 April 1913)
Commentary
64. [anonymous,] “Evolution de l’art: Vers l’amorphisme,” Les Hommes du Jour (3 May 1913): 10
Commentary
65. Fernand Leger, “Les origines de la peinture et sa valeur representative,” Montjoie! (29 May 1913): 7 and 14–29; (June 1913): 9–10
Commentary
66. Yvonne Lemaitre, “An Interview with Jean Metzinger on Cubists and What They Are Doing in the Art World,” Courier-Citizen, [Lowell, MA,] 12 May 1913, p. 7
Commentary
67. Gabrielle Buffet [Picabia], “Modern Art and the Public,” Camera Work, special issue ([New York,] June 1913): 10–14
Commentary
68. “Exhibition of New York Studies by Francis Picabia,” Camera Work ([New York,] April–July 1913): 19–20
Commentary
69. Roger de la Fresnaye, “De l’imitation dans la peinture et la sculpture,” La Grande Revue (10 July 1913): 316–25
Commentary
70. “Moderne Kunstkring, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. Exposition internationale du Cercle de l’art moderne a Amsterdam,” De Kunst: Een Algemeen Geïllustreerd En Artiskiek Weekblad ([Amsterdam,] 8 November 1913)
Commentary
71. Roger Allard, “Le Salon d’Automne,” Les Ecrits Francais (14 November 1913): 3–4
598 / Commentary 599
72. Jean Metzinger, “Kubisticka Technika,” Volné Směry 12 ([Prague,] 1913): 279–92
Commentary
73. Raymond Duchamp-Villon, “L’Architecture et le fer,” Poème et Drame (January–March 1914): 22–29
Commentary
74. Adolphe Tabarant, “Le Salon des Independants,” L’Action (1 March 1914): 2
Commentary
75. Fernand Leger, “Les realisations picturales actuelles,” Les Soirées des Paris (15 June 1914): 349–56
Commentary
76. Guillaume Apollinaire, “Simultaneisme-Librettisme,” Les Soirées de Paris (15 June 1914): 322–25
Commentary
77. Gabriel Arbouin, “Devant l’ideogramme d’Apollinaire,” Les Soirées de Paris (July–August 1914): 383–85
Commentary

Bibliography
Index

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