A Daughter's Tale: The Memoir of Winston and Clementine Churchill's Youngest Child

A Daughter's Tale: The Memoir of Winston and Clementine Churchill's Youngest Child

3.6 3
by Mary Soames
     
 

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385604482
Publisher:
Doubleday Publishing
Publication date:
09/28/2011
Pages:
402

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A Daughter's Tale: The Memoir of Winston Churchill's Youngest Child 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
AVIDREADERDA More than 1 year ago
What an engaging read this was. Thoroughly enjoyed her stories of her famous Father Winston Churchill and her mother Clementine. Mary Soames is youngest child of the Churchills', now approaching 90th birthday. Mary remarks about her growing up and uses her "never-before published diary entries". Her stories & comments take us to her wonderful childhood on the grounds of the family's estate in the country and her menagerie of pets she had. She becomes one of her father's most trusted companions, she takes us into Churchill's politics when British Parliament pushes current Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain out of office and the path to her father Winston Churchill's climb into that position - all occurring during WWII. Mary joins the war effort as a gunner in the women's auxiliary, helps shoot down the german V-1 rockets as they fall on London, becomes her father's aide-de-camp, attends the Potsdam Conference, arranges dinner with Harry Truman, Josef Stalin, and her father. Enthralling book that takes you on the war front, intimate feelings of her parents before, during and after the war, and losses of friends. This book has it all.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Far too much of this book is spent on the child's small universe and later the teenage and young adult's narrow world. A ghost writer would have been a wise decision for this memoir to mine the memories for something more interesting to the world at large.