Day Late and a Dollar Short: High Hopes and Deferred Dreams in Obama's ''Post-Racial'' America

Overview

Could this be the final victory for civil rights, or the first of many to come?

When Henry Louis Gates spoke out about his ridiculous arrest, he stated a truth few Americans-includingincluding President Obama-are eager to discuss: there is no such thing as a post-racial America. When it comes to race, the United States has come a long way, but not far enough and not fast enough. Every day, we cope with casual racism, myriad indignities, institutional obstacles, post-racial ...

See more details below
Hardcover (First Edition)
$23.51
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$25.95 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (29) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $14.23   
  • Used (22) from $1.99   

Overview

Could this be the final victory for civil rights, or the first of many to come?

When Henry Louis Gates spoke out about his ridiculous arrest, he stated a truth few Americans-includingincluding President Obama-are eager to discuss: there is no such thing as a post-racial America. When it comes to race, the United States has come a long way, but not far enough and not fast enough. Every day, we cope with casual racism, myriad indignities, institutional obstacles, post-racial nonsense, and peers bent on self-destruction. The powers that be, meanwhile, always seem to arrive with their apologies and redress a day late and a dollar short.

This book takes a close look at the lives of African-Americans from diverse backgrounds as Obama's victory comes to play a personal role in each of their lives. Every tale delves into the complex issues we will have to deal with going forward:

  • The many challenges young black men face, such as subtle persistent racism
  • The stagnation of blacks vis—vis whites
  • Widespread black participation in the military despite widespread anti-war sentiments
  • The decline of unions even as organized labor becomes the primary vehicle for black progress
  • The challenges of interracial families
  • The lack of good schools or healthcare for the poor
  • The inability of well-off blacks to lift up others

Barack Obama will deliver his first official State of the Union address in January 2010, and A Day Late and a Dollar Short will deliver an altogether different picture of the way things really under the first black president.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Jeter and Pierre, both Washington Post journalists, examine some of the pressing political and social causes of the day-health care, organized labor, the "war on terror," and incarceration-through an anecdotal lens. Some of these stories are personal, as when Pierre discusses his family's struggles with poverty, or Jeter probes how a lifetime of enduring white racism broke his father's spirit. Other subjects seem more obviously to be placeholders for a cause, like the convicted murderer who shines light on a racist penal system or the union activist who can't afford health insurance after her retirement. The attempt to straddle the personal and political falls short however. The magnitude of specific struggles seems diluted when they are lumped together and manipulated by the authors to illustrate black disenchantment from the nation's first black president.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470520666
  • Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 12/21/2009
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 246
  • Sales rank: 1,300,375
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert E. Pierre, a reporter and editor at the Washington Post, has covered politics and social issues at the Post for nearly two decades. He is a former Chicago bureau chief and a key figure in the Post's 2006 award-winning series, "Being a Black Man."

Jon Jeter has served as a producer for This American Life on NPR and as a Bureau Chief for the Washington Post. He is the author of Flat Broke in the Free Market.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

1 Daisy Mae on the Bayou: The Past Is Still with Us.

2. Made in America: Union Organizing in Chicago.

3. He Doesn't See What We See: Diop's Protest in St. Petersburg.

4. Where the Grass is Greener: Linda in the Promised Land.

5. Casualty of War: Tee Green in Baghdad.

6. White Is Not an Abstract Concept: Angela's Daughters in Appalachia.

7. Little Men: Jewel and Launnie in New Orleans.

8. Dandelions: Eddie's Freedom in D.C.

9. Watermelon Man: Cecil, Jon, and Ryan In Indianapolis.

10. The Front Man: Lee Moves from South Africa to Brooklyn.

Notes.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)