A Deadly Dozen by Susan B. Casmier, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
A Deadly Dozen

A Deadly Dozen

5.0 1
by Susan B. Casmier
     
 
The new murderous anthology featuring mysterious fiction from members of Sisters in Crime/Los Angeles. They're seedy or glamorous . . . Hollywood or Malibu . . . cool, enraged, or totally fed up-meet a collection of fascinating culprits plotting deadly deeds in this anthology of gripping crime fiction from a thrill-minded group of Los Angeles writers. Includes stories

Overview

The new murderous anthology featuring mysterious fiction from members of Sisters in Crime/Los Angeles. They're seedy or glamorous . . . Hollywood or Malibu . . . cool, enraged, or totally fed up-meet a collection of fascinating culprits plotting deadly deeds in this anthology of gripping crime fiction from a thrill-minded group of Los Angeles writers. Includes stories by Kris Neri, Cory Newman, Nathan Walpow, Ekaterine Nikas, Gay Toltl Kinman, Jamie Wallace, Phil Mann, Kate Thornton, Lisa Seidman, Gayle McGary, Joan Myers, and Dorothy Rellas. Features "Push Comes to Shove" by Nathan Walpow-selected by Otto Penzler for inclusion in Houghton Mifflin's Best American Mystery Stories 2001 and the 2001 Agatha Award-nominated "Miss Parker & the Cutter-Sanborn Tables" by Gay Toltl Kinman.

Editorial Reviews

A Deadly Dozen is a compilation of short stories, naturally involving murders, written by the Sisters in Crime in Los Angeles, California. Featuring a deadly dozen stories from such authors as: Kris Neri, Cynthia Lawrence, Cory Newman, Lisa Seidman, and others, these stories provide a platform for these writers to dip their pens into stories with a twist. This group, which formed in 1986, led by Sara Paretsky, Sisters in Crime is now a respected national organization. The Los Angeles Chapter was formed by Phyllis Miller in 1989. In recent years, male writers have been welcomed into the organization. A Deadly Dozen is the second anthology published by this group.

The problem...and the thrill...of short stories is that the characters have to introduce themselves to the reader early and completely. The reader has to immediately descend into the world that the author has created, and be ready for a real jolt at the end. Kris Neri's chilling "Sentence Imposed" does just that:

"Call it fate, call it chance—either way, it'll change your life. Sometimes you just find yourself staring into a crowd, your gaze floating aimlessly over a sea of faces you won't remember the instant you look away—until one person's eyes seem to grab hold of yours and you make a connection. You can't explain it, but somehow your life and that stranger's become bound together. When I made that link, it was with a little girl."

Whatever the subject, these writers know how to pull no punches. "Wifely Duties" is a Hitchcockian tale of a wife who plots to kill her husband, and ends up as a victim herself. "Push Comes to Shove" is a wrestler's nightmare. "Fatal Tears" is a classic sibling rivalry piece. A Deadly Dozen exposure is like taking in several episodes of "Night Gallery," with cataloging students catching a murderer in "Miss Parker and the Cutter-Sanborn Tables."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780966347326
Publisher:
UglyTown
Publication date:
05/01/2000
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.39(w) x 8.53(h) x 0.55(d)

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A Deadly Dozen 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
harstan More than 1 year ago

The Los Angeles chapter of Sisters in Crime has released a captivating short story collection centering on what else: murder and mayhem. The twelve stories are fun to read as they vary in methods, means, and motives, but share a common background: the LA area and a common theme: of entertaining the reader. Characters run the gamut from the underbelly of society to the elite, but act as culprits dispensing murder. Though this is the 'sisterhood', two of the collaborators are males, but the audience would not know gender if the stories were contributed anonymously because they are all strong entries.

Fans of murder and mystery anthologies will fully relish this collection. For the most part, the authors are just starting to become known, but in some cases, this reviewer has never previously read a work by a particular contributor. That error will be corrected as each writer holds up his or her end of the book, making for a wonderful reading experience.

Harriet Klausner