Diary of the Century: Tales by America's Greatest Diarist

Overview

From eager youth in Kewanee, Illinois, to feature writer and author, Ellis paints a palpable, candid, and telling picture of American life and his own experiences in the twentieth century. His book is filled with hundreds of characters and plots for scores of short stories and dozens of novels. He sees Garbo on the silent screen, and he hears Jolson sing when movies begin talking. He is a teenager when Wall Street crashes, and a young man during the Great Depression. His diary entries of those lean years are ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (59) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $1.99   
  • Used (56) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(2382)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1568360800 BIG FAT UNABRIDGED-

Ships from: JACKSONVILLE, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$15.00
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(321)

Condition: New
1st Edition, Fine/VG A 1/2" scrape mark on DJ front cover, o.w. clean, tight & bright. NO ink names, bookplates, DJ tears etc. ISBN 1568360800 Price unclipped.

Ships from: Troy, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(177)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

From eager youth in Kewanee, Illinois, to feature writer and author, Ellis paints a palpable, candid, and telling picture of American life and his own experiences in the twentieth century. His book is filled with hundreds of characters and plots for scores of short stories and dozens of novels. He sees Garbo on the silent screen, and he hears Jolson sing when movies begin talking. He is a teenager when Wall Street crashes, and a young man during the Great Depression. His diary entries of those lean years are among the most visceral, haunting passages in the book. As a reporter in Kewanee, New Orleans, Oklahoma City, Peoria, Chicago, and New York, Ellis had a ringside seat at events rarely witnessed by most Americans. He interviews Thomas Mann on Germany in the wake of the Nazi defeat; he watches Mae West ogle Mr. America backstage; he takes long walks with Harry Truman, and inadvertently uses Eleanor Roosevelt as a messenger during World War II. We also find candid portraits of Sinclair Lewis, Louis Armstrong, Paul Robeson, Irving Berlin, and Grace Kelly, among many other celebrities, as well as dozens of ordinary Americans, like Frank Bronnenkant, the riveter who fell in love with the Brooklyn Bridge. Cited as America's largest diary in the Guinness Book of World Records, Ellis's journal is a vivid, passionate portrait of twentieth-century America, mirroring its turbulent decades and tumultuous changes. It is also the stirring personal drama of one man and his times: the author as adolescent, bachelor, husband, father, reporter, widower, friend, and indomitable octogenarian. This is enduring Americana, evocative and enlightening, amusing and wise; a wondrous saga to read and savor often and with great pleasure.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Retired journalist Ellis (The Epic of New York City) has spent a lifetime annotating his life: his diary, started on a bet in 1927 when he was 17, has earned him inclusion in the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest in the world. Though an edited version can only skim the surface of what he actually recorded (some 20 million words over 67 years, and still accumulating), the bare bones presentation nevertheless fulfills the goal Ellis set early on: to provide not a record "of world deeds, mighty achievements, conquest" but "the drama of the unfolding life of one individual, day after day after day." Gleefully annotating his own annotations, Ellis provides a gloss on many of the entries that survived the cut from diary to book, obviously seeking to balance highlights from private life (first shave, first kiss, first byline) with choice descriptions of mainly professional encounters with the famous (e.g., Huey Long, Herbert Hoover, e.e. cummings) and the obscure (a failed suicide, two 12-year-olds fishing in a New York City park). Written in plain prose and with the sense that history is peering over his shoulder, Ellis's frank record movingly captures the march of time both outward and inward. Quoting Zola on literature, he describes his diary as "a slice of life seen through a temperament," an apt description for this often surprising and always humane document. Photos. (Sept.)
Library Journal
Ellis (A Nation in Torment, Marboro Bks., 1990) has achieved something singularly remarkable. For the past 68 years the journalist's diary has recorded his interactions with presidents, other politicians, movie stars, religious leaders, murderers, prostitutes, and individuals who believe they are God. The diary begins during the author's boyhood in rural Illinois, follows reporting stints in New Orleans, Oklahoma City, Peoria, Chicago, and New York City, and continues through his years as an author. Ellis, through his diary, lends a fresh perspective on some of the greatest events and personalities of the age while providing the reader with a sense of day-to-day life in America during the past century. This important and highly entertaining work will find an audience with historians, students of journalism, and general readers. Recommended for all libraries.-Robert Favini, Bentley Coll. Lib., Waltham, Mass.
Booknews
Excerpts from Ellis's voluminous diaries, dating from 1927 to 1995. The writing is lucid, thoughtful, and revealing, and the author's work as a newspaper reporter put him in contact with some of the most fascinating characters and events, political and otherwise, of the 20th century. B&w photographs. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Mary Carroll
For octogenarian journalist-historian Ellis, the examined life is well worth living. His 68-year diary--60-plus volumes, more than 20 million words--is, per "Guinness", the largest U.S. diary. Happily, quality as well as quantity recommends this volume for libraries: Ellis was a reporter for some 30 years in Kewanee (Illinois), New Orleans, Oklahoma City, Chicago, and New York, then wrote a classic history of the town he still calls home ("The Epic of New York City", 1966, reissued 1990) and studies of World War I and the Depression. He knows how to turn a telling phrase. Passionate from the beginning about the value of diaries to their authors "and" future historians, Ellis used his journal to explore himself and the world: analyzing relationships with different girlfriends, listing favorite songs, recounting jokes, anecdotes, interviews, and encounters with celebrities, critiquing his behavior (and misbehavior), declaring strong opinions, and coming to terms with the painful sudden death of his beloved third wife. Readers will not always "like" Ellis, but they will be grateful he kept writing (almost) every night. (Ignore the title: it's the publisher's idea.)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781568360805
  • Publisher: Kodansha International
  • Publication date: 9/28/1995
  • Pages: 578
  • Product dimensions: 6.54 (w) x 9.59 (h) x 1.87 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)