A Dictionary of Physics

A Dictionary of Physics

by John Daintith
     
 

This classic desktop reference has been thoroughly revised, bringing readers more than 3,800 entries—200 new to this edition—that define the terms of this fast-changing field with clarity and without jargon. The author provides coverage of all areas of physics and many related fields, including astronomy, astrophysics, and physical chemistry. He offers

Overview

This classic desktop reference has been thoroughly revised, bringing readers more than 3,800 entries—200 new to this edition—that define the terms of this fast-changing field with clarity and without jargon. The author provides coverage of all areas of physics and many related fields, including astronomy, astrophysics, and physical chemistry. He offers expanded information on applied physics, statistical distributions, polymers, and nanoscience, and includes ten feature articles on such key topics as crystal defects, magnetic resonance imaging, and the solar system. Here, too, are detailed appendices on SI units and the electromagnetic spectrum, a timeline of key dates in physics, a list Nobel Prize winners, and much more. And, as with all Oxford dictionaries, this volume offers abundant web links, kept up to date on the Dictionary of Physics companion web page. Featuring more than 120 diagrams, graphs, and tables, this is a superb resource for students, teachers, and professional physicists.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
According to the preface, this title derives from A Dictionary of Science (fourth and fifth eds.) and Concise Science Dictionary (first and third eds.). Daintith has helped edit Science since its fourth edition in 1999. His Dictionary of Chemistry (2008), as well as Elizabeth Martin and Robert Hine's Dictionary of Biology (2008), both by Oxford, have become companion volumes to this work since the biological, botanical, astronomical, chemical, medical, earth/environmental, and paleontological entries have been excised. What remains is astrophysics, physical chemistry, mathematics relevant to physics, metal science, computing, electronics, and biographies of physical scientists. Some 240 new entries have been added to this work, bringing the total to 3900; the 120 illustrations seem fewer. Entry size ranges from a couple of lines on dynamo, to a paragraph or more on energy and quantum computing, to a full page on magnetism, to longer special features and chronologies on big-bang, atomic theory, nanophysics, and elementary particles. BOTTOM LINE Oxford appears to be leaving behind the big-print versions of comprehensive dictionaries like Chambers Dictionary of Science and Technology and Collins' Dictionary of Science and Technology, instead favoring handbook-like volumes with jargon-free explanations geared to the first-year university student and nonscientist. If your library still invests in print science reference, buy this. It's clear, it's cheap, and it's good.—Janice Dunham, John Jay Coll. Lib., CUNY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199233991
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
04/01/2010
Series:
Oxford Paperback Reference Series
Edition description:
Revised
Pages:
624
Product dimensions:
4.90(w) x 7.50(h) x 1.50(d)

Meet the Author

John Daintith is an editor at Market House Books.

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