Overview

Ibsen's classic play about the need of every individual to find out the kind of person he or she really is and to strive to become that person.
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A Doll's House

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Overview

Ibsen's classic play about the need of every individual to find out the kind of person he or she really is and to strive to become that person.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013945388
  • Publisher: Philtre Libre
  • Publication date: 2/15/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 228 KB

Meet the Author

Henrik Johan Ibsen (20 March 1828 – 23 May 1906) was a major 19th-century Norwegian playwright, theatre director, and poet. He is often referred to as "the father of realism" and is one of the founders of Modernism in the theatre. His major works include Brand, Peer Gynt, An Enemy of the People, Emperor and Galilean, A Doll's House, Hedda Gabler, Ghosts, The Wild Duck, Rosmersholm, and The Master Builder.
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2007

    Understanding Nora

    Once the story got started I really liked it. Although the story can be seen as disturbing or weird, I believe there is a lot of meaning behind it. Nora, Trovald's wife is the main character, and all the minor characters really help bring out her, and her personality. She does seem like a little kid, always supported by her father or Trovald, which he calls her things like 'skylark' and 'squirrel'. What made the story a lot more interesting is the whole scandal about the loan Krogstad provided to Nora for Trovald's life. Being Krogstad just lost his job, Trovald fired him, and his ex-love got his job, who in mind is Nora's really good friend, the only way for Krogstad to get back at Trovald is to blackmail Nora. When it comes down to it, and the letter is in Trovald's box, from Krogstad, the only thing Ms. Linde, Nora's friend could tell her is she basically needs to figure out what is the right thing to do. Mr. Ibsen did a really good job with the climax, cause this is where it is starting to get good. Nora baiscally comes out with it, and tells Trovald how he makes her feel. Him being the uptight man that he is, shows that his weakness is how other people will see him. And what surprises everybody is Nora leaves, to find herself. The only thing that would keep me from giving this book a top notch rating is the fact she leaves her kids, that's sad, but it could be understandable. But also the beginning. It was rather slow, and in a way was weak. But overall I liked the book, it kept me interested, and surprised me through out the story.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 19, 2011

    Nora makes women seem ignorant

    Ridiculous. That pretty much sums up the whole play. It was suppose to be about a "woman standing up" and blah blah, but I personally didn't see it that way. Nora's life was pretty good. Torvald was a sweet man, good husband, and treated Nora like she was a fragile little China doll. There's a part in the play when Torvald becomes upset and says things he does not mean and then after Nora acts like a psycho and starts saying that she's leaving Torvald (her husband) and her three kids to go "find her self" and that Torvald treats her like she's a doll. I really don't see what's wrong with that and if Nora hated it SO MUCH why didn't she just ask him to back off a little and give her some space. But no she was unreasonable and not a woman that I think women should be looking up to. She did not know how to be a good mother or wife and if shes a character that women are suppose to look up to... well then her followers will be ignorant and not the strong women they SHOULD BE. I hated this play. Worse "women independence" play ever.

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 14, 2014

    Fantastic book

    Fantastic book

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  • Posted March 29, 2013

    Wonderful play

    I was in the Doll House when i was a wee lad, this nook book brought me back.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2007

    A Woman Who Took A Stand!!

    I love this drama. It shows how women can take a stand even when they believe they can't. Torvald was a very controlling husband who knew everything, but didn't know what was going on right under his nose. Nora felt as if she was a doll living in her own doll house and Torvald was the person who could say whether or not she could play. He was the 'puppet master'. I love the climax of the dance of the Tarentella. It was a dance of death. She didn't die physically, but the controlled Nora died bringing to life the confident independent Nora. All all I can say is at the end the door slams on all problems women could possibly face.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2006

    A Doll's House, child's play

    I was thoroughly absorbed in this book! I couldn't put it down. Though, I couldn't stand Nora, the way she was so pleased with herself and seemingly oblivious to the value of money. Ridiculous flirting with her husband as if shaking him to get the last pennies out of the piggy bank. She couldn't even stop herself from eating macaroons behind Torvald's back! Clearly having no respect for her husband in the first place. But it was captivating to see how much she strived for what she wanted, how much she went through to stop her husband gaining knowledge of her supposed sins only to realise this wasn't what she wanted at all. I sympathised more with Krogstad, Dr Rank and Mrs Linde, who acted as Nora's conscience. Nora and Torvald were disgusting characters. Both consumed by pride- it made great fiction!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2004

    defiance for a better future

    As a bound women of stereotypes and a family that she doesn't know, Nora's self liberation isn't so surprising after all. Her burst for freedom was iminent, but only occured when she realised that it would never change. Ibsen creates a doll's house, or even a bird's cage, where the vulnerable creature can only have a say when they realise that they have a voice to express their views. Through an intricate storyline, one can learn valuable lessons concerning what one does for love and what one does for the sake of their own future. Not only does Nora free herself from her cage, but she destroys all future possiblities of new cages.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2003

    Breakable Porcelain

    I believe that this is one of them most wonderful books about independence I have ever read. Nora Helmer, who seems as an innocent child, displays an amazing metamorphisis throughout this book. At first she seems to enjoy being indulged in her childlike ways. As the story progresses, we come to discover that she is not as innocent as she looks. Nora has a secret about her father's affairs after he died, she forged his signature, and has kept it from Torvald, her husband , all these years. She has only kept it from him because she did not think she could make it on her own (because she knew if he knew about it, she would surely be casted away.) In the end, all is told and although furious, Torvald plans to keep it from everyone and continue on with everything. Nora, at this point, decides that she can make it on her own and leaves Torvald. Very good story, especially for the time period it is set in. I enjoyed it thoroughly.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2003

    The 19th Century Wonder

    I think that this play is very realistic and that it applies to people today. If everyone read this play, I am sure the world would be much better.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2002

    A Doll No More

    Ibsen introduced new, daring ideas that were practically unheard of in his day. Nora, the main character, acts and is treated like a doll by her domineering husband Torvald. He controls everything, even what she eats. He strives for perfection, and convinces both himself and Nora that their marriage is faultless. However, as the play progresses, you can see that underneath that feeble, doll image, Nora is a real person with real feelings. She realizes that the ¿perfect¿ life she is living is all an illusion that they had both created so they wouldn't have to face each other with any horrible facts of their life. When Nora walks out, the illusion is shattered. Their society sees that they were not ¿perfect¿, and that they had problems. It also showed that Nora was stronger, even though she was a woman. This play is very realistic in the sense that it correctly portrays the reality of what occurs in life. People still put up artificial appearances in front of others just to fit in with the society they live in. Ibsen was widely criticized for this play because he had made public what everyone had been trying so hard to hide for so long.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2002

    i played Christine Linde for my college annual play....

    just went through the script and i found it interesting...close to reality...i was given the character of Mrs Linde..a widow..expressed well as a young widows character.. Nora Helmer..is an amazing character...innocent yet very strong...she goes along well with the flow..and becomes strong with her decision when its time to leave...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2002

    a plus for english class

    I am reading this play in my English class right now in highschool and I find myself to enjoy it very much. I can relate to Nora's experiences on love and in finding herself. I admire this fictional character. I recommend this book to everyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2002

    Shocking

    I read the reviews others had left and I couldn't wait to start reading it. Nora completely changes. This is a very good book and I would recommend it to everyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2002

    A revoluntionary declaration

    A Doll's house shocked Victorian society with a scathing indictment of patriarchal rule. Although Nora's transformation seems to come 'out of the blue', one must remember it is a three act drama (which would have made a more stunning novel). Reviews of the period were often unfavorable, as the play sought to upturn one of the principles central to Victorian society. Vivid, striking language and symbolism, along with a frank ending scene, lend this work interest and poignantcy. An excellent work for a student in search of a research topic.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2001

    Reading a Dolls House

    I read A Dolls house by Henrik Ibsen. I found the book to be boring but intresting in parts. I was suprised at how it ended. I like the charters and they way the writer brought them to life. The book was too short and not direct enough to understand that was my only problem with it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2001

    A Doll's House

    When I first started reading this book, I thought it would be another horrid summer reading book from a list thought up by the mind of a teacher whose most recent brush with the present was in 1971. Much to my delight I was mistaken. A Doll's House was slow at the beggining and Nora seemed pathetic to me, at the end i could not put the book down. I was surprised by the end, her leaving was the last thing i expected.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2001

    Why a doll's life isn't that great.

    When I first started reading the book, I thought it was going to be so boring throughout the whole book. However, I was mistaken. In the beginning it starts out like everything is so perfect. Like no one could ever ask for a better life. Nora is married to a wealthy man, and has two kids. Throughout the book, there was alot of feelings a lot of girls can relate to with their boyfriends or husbands. Although it all seemed a doll's life, it does a 360 and ends up the total oppisite of what it lead on to be. Nora didn't seem like the type to do something like that.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2001

    Outstanding Work By Ibsen

    I read the play by Ibsen and was captivated. I couldn't put it down. I was immediately caught up in the web being spun by each of the characters. I believe it was set up to feel sorry for Nora in the beginning, which I did, and create the end to feel sorry for Torvald. I thought that in the end she acted like a lunatic, saying that Torvald never actually loved her. But if you carefully look at the small things he said to her, you would be able to see that he did love her in his own little way. I would definitely recommend this work by Ibsen for people of all ages to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2000

    She should've gotten out sooner

    I don't know why Nora put up with Torvald. He basically just needed her there to fulfill the 'perfect wife, perfect life' type of thing. Even though Torvald acted as if she was inferior, he still treated her well. I think Nora is to blame. At any time she could've snapped out of her 'perfect wife' role and became the woman she was suppposed to be. I think all woman should read this so they don't get stuck in a doll's house themselves.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2000

    a classic play

    some have said ibsen's classic play is outdated, but i would have to disagree. many of the issues (about women) dealt with in this play are still valid. it's well written and well thought out. you should read it

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