A Few Words in the Mother Tongue: Poems Selected and New (1971-1990)

A Few Words in the Mother Tongue: Poems Selected and New (1971-1990)

by Irena Klepfisz
     
 

"Her poems are a tribute to strength in the midst of terrible alienation."--Publishers Weekly¶ "An important contemporary look at history through poetry."--Library Journal¶"What Klepfisz is: a survivor who studies survival, who lays out the cost of surviving in her poems.... She operates from a stark but deep compassion."--American

Overview


"Her poems are a tribute to strength in the midst of terrible alienation."--Publishers Weekly¶ "An important contemporary look at history through poetry."--Library Journal¶"What Klepfisz is: a survivor who studies survival, who lays out the cost of surviving in her poems.... She operates from a stark but deep compassion."--American Book Review

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Her father was gunned down during the Warsaw Ghetto resistance, and Klepfisz (coeditor of The Tribe of Dina: A Jewish Woman's Anthology ; also see review above), aged three, fled with her mother into the countryside. It was because of her mother's fluent Polish that they were able to pass as peasants and survive; Yiddish would have betrayed their Jewish identity. This is the collection's theme: language's power to mediate the course of history; but also its weakness in the face of the chasm that history cleaves in memory, an impenetrable absence of self. Her father is a symbol of this in ``Searching for my Father's Body'': ``His death, / stares at me from the faded page, / stares at me without penetrating / my reason or understanding. / Simply a fact, dead, / like the object it describes.'' The exceptional volume charts the course of Klepfisz's artistic transformation through three stages: the earlier poems are about the hidden self; later poems talk of her immersion in the world (Klepfisz can even write from the perspective of zoo-captive female monkeys without a trace of sentimentality), work and love; and the title pieces incorporate the Yiddish language into their spare form and profound vision. Her poems are a tribute to strength in the midst of terrible alienation. (Oct.)
Library Journal
This volume brings together the best work of the Jewish and feminist poet Klepfisz, born in 1941 in the Warsaw Ghetto. Her father was killed there, but Klepfisz escaped along with her mother. Her poetry bespeaks a historic consciousness about many of her experiences: ``During the war/ germans were known/ to pick up infants/ by their feet/ swing them through the air/ and smash their heads/ against plaster walls/ somehow/ i managed/ to escape that fate.'' Spare language is used throughout--in the poems about women of the Holocaust, poems in bilingual Yiddish/English that tell of her Yiddish cultural heritage, and poems about lesbian love and freedom. Klepfisz is a political, powerful, and forceful poet. The most recent poems examine the pain and necessity of identifying as a Jew with the Palestinians under Israeli occupation. An important contemporary look at history through poetry.-- Molly Abramowitz, Silver Spring, Md.
Booknews
Riding each evening through the echoing tunnels, ep I've begun to believe in the existence of my ownep soul, its frailty, its ability to grow narrow, ep small. I've begun to understand what it means ep to be born mute, to be born without hope of speech.ep From "Contexts". Published by The Eighth Mountain Press, 624 Southeast Avenue, Portland, OR 97214-3026. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780933377059
Publisher:
The Eighth Mountain Press
Publication date:
01/01/1993
Edition description:
1st ed
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
657,516
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.70(d)

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