A Field Guide to California and Pacific Northwest Forests

A Field Guide to California and Pacific Northwest Forests

by John C. Kricher, Gordon Morrison
     
 

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This comprehensive field guide includes all the flora and fauna you're most likely to see in the forests of California and the Pacific Northwest. With 53 color plates and 80 color photos illustrating trees, birds, mammals, wildflowers, mushrooms, reptiles, amphibians, butterflies, moths, and other insects.

Overview

This comprehensive field guide includes all the flora and fauna you're most likely to see in the forests of California and the Pacific Northwest. With 53 color plates and 80 color photos illustrating trees, birds, mammals, wildflowers, mushrooms, reptiles, amphibians, butterflies, moths, and other insects.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547992426
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
11/15/1998
Series:
Peterson Field Guides
Sold by:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
400
File size:
124 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Read an Excerpt


Deserts Three deserts in North America receive virtually all their precipitation in the form of rain, never snow, and are thus called “hot deserts”: the Sonoran Desert, the Chihuahuan Desert, and the Mojave Desert (described briefly in Chapter 6, “California Forests”). Many of these desert areas receive under 10 inches of precipitation a year. Thus the species that live here must be able to survive on little water. Hot deserts typically contain many succulent species, which store water in their thick, fleshy leaves and stems. Cactus plants are common here, as well as a diverse array of yuccas and agaves. The Mojave Desert is dominated primarily by one species of yucca, the Joshuatree. Some hot deserts have areas where trees manage to survive, especially the various mesquites and paloverdes. Most hot deserts receive enough water to support some woody shrubs, especially Creosote Bush. Deserts vary with latitude. Those sufficiently far north receive some winter snow and are called “cold deserts.” Lying between the Coast Ranges and the Rockies is the Great Basin Desert, the “big brown area” that air travelers see clearly from 30,000 feet. This vast desert exists because moisture is so efficiently blocked by the surrounding mountain ranges that very little is left to fall in most of eastern Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, and Nevada. The Great Basin Desert is a “cold desert” — though tourists traveling through Nevada in the middle of summer might disagree. These deserts tend to be composed of scattered but hardy shrubs such as Big Sagebrush.

Meet the Author

Gordon Morrison is a well-known naturalist whose work has been praised by Roger Tory Peterson as "Marvelous, beautiful, excellent . . . Morrison’s work is so inspiring that I wish such clear material was available when I was slowly learning ecology. . . . We owe a debt of gratitude to Gordon for his interpretive skills as an artist. He is a superb teacher who uses visual methods." Robert Bateman likened his work to that of Albrecht Durer and Andrew Wyeth. Gordon Morrison makes his home in Massachusetts.
Roger Tory Peterson, one of the world's greatest naturalists, received every major award for ornithology, natural science, and conservation as well as numerous honorary degrees, medals, and citations, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The Peterson Identification System has been called the greatest invention since binoculars. These editions include updated material by Michael O'Brien, Paul Lehman, Bill Thompson III, Michael DiGiorgio, Larry Rosche, and Jeffrey A. Gordon.
John Kricher's works include the Peterson Field Guides to Eastern Forests, Rocky Mountain and Southwestern Forests, and California and Pacific Northwest Forests.

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