A Field Guide to Feeder Birds: Eastern and Central North America

Overview

Slim and affordable, FEEDER BIRDS OF EASTERN NORTH AMERICA features Roger Tory Peterson's classic art in a larger format designed especially for the eighty million North Americans who watch and feed birds. This easy-to-use, at-a-glance guide simplifies identification by including only the birds that frequent feeders. And to make it even more convenient, the most commonly seen birds come first, followed by those that are harder to identify or that rarely visit feeders. Range maps, descriptions of birds and foods ...

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Overview

Slim and affordable, FEEDER BIRDS OF EASTERN NORTH AMERICA features Roger Tory Peterson's classic art in a larger format designed especially for the eighty million North Americans who watch and feed birds. This easy-to-use, at-a-glance guide simplifies identification by including only the birds that frequent feeders. And to make it even more convenient, the most commonly seen birds come first, followed by those that are harder to identify or that rarely visit feeders. Range maps, descriptions of birds and foods that attract them, and illustrations are on facing pages, so identification is fast and easy. The brand-new introduction covers important bird-feeding topics, including types of feeders and where to place them, birdbaths, kinds of food and when to feed, plantings that attract birds, and solutions to problems with squirrels and cats. A handy quick-reference list tells what kind of food each species prefers, and a feeder checklist provides a record of birds as they are seen.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780618059447
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 4/28/2000
  • Series: Peterson Field Guides Series
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 188,160
  • Product dimensions: 6.63 (w) x 10.75 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Roger Tory Peterson, one of the world's greatest naturalists, received every major award for ornithology, natural science, and conservation as well as numerous honorary degrees, medals, and citations, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The Peterson Identification System has been called the greatest invention since binoculars. These editions include updated material by Michael O'Brien, Paul Lehman, Bill Thompson III, Michael DiGiorgio, Larry Rosche, and Jeffrey A. Gordon.

Roger Tory Peterson, one of the world's greatest naturalists, received every major award for ornithology, natural science, and conservation as well as numerous honorary degrees, medals, and citations, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The Peterson Identification System has been called the greatest invention since binoculars. These editions include updated material by Michael O'Brien, Paul Lehman, Bill Thompson III, Michael DiGiorgio, Larry Rosche, and Jeffrey A. Gordon.

Roger Tory Peterson, one of the world's greatest naturalists, received every major award for ornithology, natural science, and conservation as well as numerous honorary degrees, medals, and citations, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The Peterson Identification System has been called the greatest invention since binoculars. These editions include updated material by Michael O'Brien, Paul Lehman, Bill Thompson III, Michael DiGiorgio, Larry Rosche, and Jeffrey A. Gordon.

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Read an Excerpt

When to Feed Birds Perhaps the most frequently asked questions about feeding birds concern when to feed them. When should I start feeding? When should I stop so I don’t affect migration? Can I feed in the summer? Several issues must be considered.
People feed birds in order to enjoy them, so why not feed them all year long? As long as you’re willing to put in the time to maintain the feeding area—supply food and water and keep the area clean—you will be rewarded by birds using the site. You may not get the variety in the summer that you’ll see during migration or in the winter when there is more of a dependency on the feeder, but you may be rewarded with the antics of young birds being introduced to the site.
Birds can become dependent on feeders for supplemental food. It has been shown, however, that they do not rely on feeders for all of their food and perhaps not even a quarter of what they eat. That said, though, the feeder can be an important resource during times of duress. When severe snowstorms blanket wild food supplies, the birds will turn to the feeder they have come to know as a food resource. It is during these times of stress that the feeder plays its most vital role. Do not let them down at this point! If it is a storm of long duration, the feeding station may mean the difference of life for some of the more physiologically unprepared birds. The feeder helps many a bird through the hard times, so it is important to be faithful to your feeding once you start.
As for the question of affecting migration by holding the birds at the feeder so that they will not go north to breed or south for the winter, the answer is that birds are not controlled by food. Once the hormones for breeding begin to flow, they head north, and once the drive for migrating south takes hold, off they go, no matter how much food is available. If a species that normally does not stay for the summer or winter remains at the feeder, it is more than likely a young bird that does not have the proper hormonal impulse to migrate or an older bird that simply can no longer make extensive journeys. You are not affecting the breeding or migrant population of the birds of the United States by feeding.

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Table of Contents

Map of Area Covered by This Book inside front cover Introduction 1 Bird Feeders 3 Food 9 When to Feed Birds 13 Plantings 14 The Squirrel Problem 17 Predators 19 Night Visitors 21 How to Identify Birds 23 Quick Reference Food List 30 Plates 32 Feeder Checklist 98 Index 102

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2001

    Excellent Guide for Backyard Birders

    Excellent, easy-to-use guide for anyone feeding birds from their backyard. Unlike other guides (including Peterson), the pictures (plates) are positioned next to bird descriptions rather than being buried 100 pages away. The ranges are depicted pictorially next to the descriptions so everything is together. The pictures also include arrows that quickly highlight differences between common species. Almost all of the birds you will see in your backyard are in this book. Also included are guides and instructions on backyard feeding in general. Highly recommended for those who enjoy watching birds in their backyard. However, novices will gain the most from this book.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 6, 2010

    Good for the backyard bird lover

    I have gotten a lot of good use from this book. Our grandsons have had the fun of seeing birds in the backyard and looking for them in the book.

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