A Field Guide to Western Trees

A Field Guide to Western Trees

by George A. Petrides
     
 

This newly designed field guide features detailed descriptions of 387 species, arranged in six major groups by visual similarity. The 47 color plates and 5 text drawings show distinctive details needed for identification. Color photographs and 295 color range maps accompany the species descriptions.See more details below

Overview

This newly designed field guide features detailed descriptions of 387 species, arranged in six major groups by visual similarity. The 47 color plates and 5 text drawings show distinctive details needed for identification. Color photographs and 295 color range maps accompany the species descriptions.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This new field guide includes all the native and naturalized trees of western North America, from the arctic treeline in Alaska and Canada to northern Mexico. Some 400 trees are illustrated in color, along with comparison charts, range maps, keys to plants in leafless condition, and text distinctions between similar species. Beautiful work. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395467305
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company
Publication date:
03/01/1992
Series:
Peterson Field Guide Series
Pages:
308
Product dimensions:
4.72(w) x 7.51(h) x 1.10(d)

Read an Excerpt

TWO-NEEDLE PINYON Pinus edulis Engelm. Pl. 1
A short, round-topped, arid-zone tree mainly of the s. Rockies.
Needles 2 per cluster, 3?4–2 in. long, dark green, sharp but
not
spiny. Cones short, 1–2 in. long, somewhat spherical, with thick,
blunt, thornless scales and 2 wingless half-inch nuts per scale.
Height 15–20 (50) ft.; diameter 1–2 (3) ft. Dry sites. Similar
species: See Lodgepole Pine. Remarks: Like the other nut pines (see
Singleleaf Pinyon), the fruits are eagerly sought by wildlife and
humans alike. Reported to be the most common tree in N.M. A single-
needle population is reported to occur in cen. Ariz. Resin from trunk
wounds is said to have been used by Native Americans to waterproof
woven bottles and to cement turquoise jewelry.

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