BN.com Gift Guide

A First Course in Scientific Computing: Symbolic, Graphic, and Numeric Modeling Using Maple, Java, Mathematica, and Fortran90 / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $39.95
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 60%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (10) from $39.95   
  • New (7) from $43.33   
  • Used (3) from $39.95   

Overview

This book offers a new approach to introductory scientific computing. It aims to make students comfortable using computers to do science, to provide them with the computational tools and knowledge they need throughout their college careers and into their professional careers, and to show how all the pieces can work together. Rubin Landau introduces the requisite mathematics and computer science in the course of realistic problems, from energy use to the building of skyscrapers to projectile motion with drag. He is attentive to how each discipline uses its own language to describe the same concepts and how computations are concrete instances of the abstract.

Landau covers the basics of computation, numerical analysis, and programming from a computational science perspective. The first part of the printed book uses the problem-solving environment Maple as its context, with the same material covered on the accompanying CD as both Maple and Mathematica programs; the second part uses the compiled language Java, with equivalent materials in Fortran90 on the CD; and the final part presents an introduction to LaTeX replete with sample files.

Providing the essentials of computing, with practical examples, A First Course in Scientific Computing adheres to the principle that science and engineering students learn computation best while sitting in front of a computer, book in hand, in trial-and-error mode. Not only is it an invaluable learning text and an essential reference for students of mathematics, engineering, physics, and other sciences, but it is also a consummate model for future textbooks in computational science and engineering courses.

  • A broad spectrum of computing tools and examples that can be used throughout an academic career
  • Practical computing aimed at solving realistic problems
  • Both symbolic and numerical computations
  • A multidisciplinary approach: science + math + computer science
  • Maple and Java in the book itself; Mathematica, Fortran90, Maple and Java on the accompanying CD in an interactive workbook format


Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Computers and Geosciences - Frits Agterberg
The contents can be taught in lab-based courses at the undergraduate level. Much of the material covered is usually addressed in separate books. Therefore, the book is also suitable for independent study by graduate students and professional who wish to learn one or more of the languages in a comprehensive way with the emphasis kept on problem-solving.
IEEE Computing in Science and Engineering - Michael Jay Schillaci
The colloquial and tutorial approach might help alleviate the many practical problems associated with incorporating computational applications into a more traditional lecture environment. The text provides many concrete and programming examples in action and illustrates how much you can accomplish with a few well-chosen tools. . . . [S]tudents impressed with the text's workbook style and reference book quality will add it to their bookshelves and return to it often.
From the Publisher
One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 2005

"Essential. . . . Rubin Landau offers a practical introduction to the world of scientific computing or numerical analysis. He introduces not only the concepts of numerical analysis, but also more importantly the tools that can be used to perform scientific computing. . . . The presentation is particularly useful because real-life examples with real code and results are included."Choice

"Not only is [this book] an invaluable learning text and an essential reference for students of mathematics, engineering, physics, and other sciences, but it is also a consummate model for future textbooks in computational science and engineering courses."Mathematical Reviews

"The contents can be taught in lab-based courses at the undergraduate level. Much of the material covered is usually addressed in separate books. Therefore, the book is also suitable for independent study by graduate students and professional who wish to learn one or more of the languages in a comprehensive way with the emphasis kept on problem-solving."—Frits Agterberg, Computers and Geosciences

"The colloquial and tutorial approach might help alleviate the many practical problems associated with incorporating computational applications into a more traditional lecture environment. The text provides many concrete and programming examples in action and illustrates how much you can accomplish with a few well-chosen tools. . . . [S]tudents impressed with the text's workbook style and reference book quality will add it to their bookshelves and return to it often."—Michael Jay Schillaci, IEEE Computing in Science and Engineering

Choice
Essential. . . . Rubin Landau offers a practical introduction to the world of scientific computing or numerical analysis. He introduces not only the concepts of numerical analysis, but also more importantly the tools that can be used to perform scientific computing. . . . The presentation is particularly useful because real-life examples with real code and results are included.
Mathematical Reviews
Not only is [this book] an invaluable learning text and an essential reference for students of mathematics, engineering, physics, and other sciences, but it is also a consummate model for future textbooks in computational science and engineering courses.
Computers and Geosciences
The contents can be taught in lab-based courses at the undergraduate level. Much of the material covered is usually addressed in separate books. Therefore, the book is also suitable for independent study by graduate students and professional who wish to learn one or more of the languages in a comprehensive way with the emphasis kept on problem-solving.
— Frits Agterberg
IEEE Computing in Science and Engineering
The colloquial and tutorial approach might help alleviate the many practical problems associated with incorporating computational applications into a more traditional lecture environment. The text provides many concrete and programming examples in action and illustrates how much you can accomplish with a few well-chosen tools. . . . [S]tudents impressed with the text's workbook style and reference book quality will add it to their bookshelves and return to it often.
— Michael Jay Schillaci
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691121833
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 4/11/2005
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 472
  • Sales rank: 1,314,173
  • Product dimensions: 7.22 (w) x 10.30 (h) x 1.35 (d)

Meet the Author

Rubin H. Landau is Distinguished Professor of Physics and Director of the Computational Physics Program at Oregon State University. He is the lead author of "Computational Physics: Problem Solving with Computers; A Scientist's and Engineer's Guide to Workstations and Supercomputers;" and "Quantum Mechanics II: A Second Course in Quantum Theory."
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Figures xv
List of Tables xix
Preface xxi

Chapter 1. Introduction 1
1.1 Nature of Scientific Computing 1
1.2 Talking to Computers 2
1.3 Instructional Guide 4
1.4 Exercises to Come Back To 6

PART 1. MAPLE (OR MATHEMATICA) BY DOING 7

Chapter 2. Getting Started with Maple 9
2.1 Setting Up Your Work Space 9
2.2 Maple’s Problem-Solving Environment 10
2.3 Maple’s Command Structure 14
2.4 Sums and sums 16
2.5 Execution Groups 21
2.6 Key Words and Concepts 22
2.7 Supplementary Exercises 23

Chapter 3. Numbers, Expressions, Functions; Rocket Golf 25
3.1 Problem: Viewing Rocket Golf 25
3.2 Theory: Einstein’s Special Relativity 26
3.3 Math: Integer, Rational and Irrational Numbers 27
3.4 CS: Floating-Point Numbers 29
3.5 Complex Numbers 31
3.6 Expressions 32
3.7 Assignment Statements 34
3.8 Equality (rhs, lhs) 36
3.9 Functions 36
3.10 User-Defined Functions 39
3.11 Reexpressing Answers 39
3.12 CS: Overflow, Underflow, and Round-Off Error 44
3.13 Solution: Viewing Rocket Golf 45
3.14 Extension: Tachyons* 50
3.15 Key Words and Concepts 51
3.16 Supplementary Exercises 51

Chapter 4. Visualizing Data, Abstract Types; Electric Fields 55
4.1 Why Visualization? 55
4.2 Problem: Stable Points in Electric Fields 56
4.3 Theory: Stability Criteria and Potential Energy 56
4.4 Basic 2-D Plots: plot 58
4.5 Compound (Abstract) Data Types: [Lists] and {Sets } 63
4.6 3-D (Surface) Plots of Analytic Functions 69
4.7 Solution: Dipole and Quadrupole Fields 73
4.8 Exploration: The Tripole 76
4.9 Extension: Yet More Plot Types* 76
4.10 Visualizing Numerical Data 91
4.11 Plotting a Matrix: matrixplot* 97
4.12 Animations of Data* 102
4.13 Key Words and Concepts 104
4.14 Supplementary Exercises 105

Chapter 5. Solving Equations, Differentiation; Towers 107
5.1 Problem: Maximum Height of a Tower 107
5.2 Model: Block Stacking 107
5.3 Math: Equations as Challenges 109
5.4 Solving a Single Equation: solve, fsolve 110
5.5 Solving Simultaneous Equations (Sets) 113
5.6 Solution to Tower Problem 115
5.7 Differentiation: limit, diff, D 117
5.8 Numerical Derivatives* 126
5.9 Alternate Solution: Maximum Tower Height 127
5.10 Assessment and Exploration 128
5.11 Auxiliary Problem: Nonlinear Oscillations 129
5.12 Key Words and Concepts 131
5.13 Supplementary Exercises 131

Chapter 6. Integration; Power and Energy Usage (Also 14) 134
6.1 Problem: Relating Power and Energy Usage 134
6.2 Empirical Models 134
6.3 Theory: Power and Energy Definitions 136
6.4 Maple: Tools for Integration 136
6.5 Problem Solution: Energy from Power 139
6.6 Key Words and Concepts 143
6.7 Supplementary Exercises 144

Chapter 7. Matrices and Vectors; Rotation 145
7.1 Problem: Rigid-Body Rotation 145
7.2 Math: Vectors and Matrices 147
7.3 Theory: Angular Momentum Dynamics 149
7.4 Maple: Linear Algebra Tools 151
7.5 Matrix Arithmetic and Operations 157
7.6 Solution: Rotating Rigid Bodies 171
7.7 Exploration: Principal Axes of Rotation* 176
7.8 Key Words and Concepts 181
7.9 Supplementary Exercises 182

Chapter 8. Searching, Programming; Dipsticks 184
8.1 Problem: Volume of Liquid in Spherical Tanks 184
8.2 Math: Volume Integration 184
8.3 Algorithm: Bisection Searches 185
8.4 Programming in Maple 187
8.5 Solution: Volume from Dipstick Height 194
8.6 Key Words and Concepts 195
8.7 Supplementary Exercises 196

PART 2. JAVA (OR FORTRAN90) BY DOING 197

Chapter 9. Getting Started with Java 199
9.1 Compiled Languages 199
9.2 Java Program Pieces 201
9.3 Entering and Running Your First Program 202
9.4 Looking Inside Area.java 205
9.5 Key Words 207
9.6 Supplementary Exercises 207

Chapter 10. Data Types, Limits, Methods; Rocket Golf 208
10.1 Problem and Theory (Same as Chapter 3) 208
10.2 Java’s Primitive Data Types 208
10.3 Methods (Functions) and Modular Programming 215
10.4 Solution: Viewing Rocket Golf 219
10.5 Your Problem: Modify Golf.java 223
10.6 Coercion and Overloading* 224
10.7 Key Words 229

Chapter 11. Visualization with Java, Classes, Packages 232
11.1 2-D Graphs within Java: PtPlot 232
11.2 Installing PtPlot: See Appendix C* 238
11.3 Classes and Packages* 238
11.4 Gnuplot Basics 240
11.5 Java Archives: jar* 244

Chapter 12. Flow Control via Logic; Projectiles 247
12.1 Problem: Frictionless Projectile Motion 247
12.2 Theory: Kinematics 248
12.3 Computer Science: Designing Structured Programs 249
12.4 Flow Control via Logic 251
12.5 Implementation: Projectile.java 258
12.6 Solution: Projectile Trajectories 259
12.7 Key Words 259
12.8 Supplementary Exercises 260

Chapter 13. Java Input and Output* 262
13.1 Basic Input with Scanner 263
13.2 Streams: Standard Output, Input, and Error 263
13.3 I/O Exceptions: FileCatchThrow.java 272
13.4 Automatic Code Documentation: javadoc 274
13.5 Nonstandard Formatted Output: printf 275

Chapter 14. Numerical Integration; Power and Energy Usage 281
14.1 Problem (Same as Chapter 6): Power and Energy 281
14.2 Algorithms: Trapezoid and Simpson’s Rules 282
14.3 Assessment: Which Rule Is Better? 288
14.4 Key Words and Concepts 289
14.5 Supplementary Exercises 289

Chapter 15. Differential Equations with Java and Maple* 290
15.1 Problem: Projectile Motion with Drag 290
15.2 Model: Velocity-Dependent Drag 291
15.3 Algorithm: Numerical Differentiation 292
15.4 Math: Solving Differential Equations 292
15.5 Assessment: Balls Falling Out of the Sky? 295
15.6 Maple: Differential-Equation Tools 297
15.7 Maple Solution: Drag ∝ Velocity 302
15.8 Extract Operands 303
15.9 Drag ∝v2 (Exercise) 306
15.10 Drag ∝v3/2 306
15.11 Exploration: Planetary Motion* 310
15.12 Key Words 311
15.13 Supplementary Exercises 311

Chapter 16. Object-Oriented Programming; Complex Currents 313
16.1 Problem: Resonance in RLC Circuit 313
16.2 Math: Complex Numbers 313
16.3 Theory: Resistance Becomes Impedance 317
16.4 CS: Abstract Data Types, Objects 319
16.5 Java Solution: Complex Currents 329
16.6 Maple Solution: Complex Currents 330
16.7 Explorations: OOP Worked Examples* 334
16.8 Key Words 340
16.9 Java and Maple Exercises 340

Chapter 17. Arrays: Vectors, Matrices; Rigid-Body Rotations 341
17.1 Problem: Rigid-Body Rotations 341
17.2 Theory: Angular-Momentum Dynamics 343
17.3 CS, Math: Arrays, Vectors, and Matrices 344
17.4 Implementation: Inertia.java, Inertia3D.java 347
17.5 Jama: Java Matrix Library* 349
17.6 Key Words 353
17.7 Supplementary Exercises 353

Chapter 18. Advanced Objects; Baton Projectiles* 355
18.1 Problem: Trajectory of Thrown Baton 355
18.2 Theory: Combined Translation and Rotation 356
18.3 CS: OOP Design Concepts 359
18.4 Key Words 377
18.5 Supplementary Exercises 377

Chapter 19. Discrete Math, Arrays as Bins; Bug Dynamics* 378
19.1 Problem: Variability of Bug Populations 378
19.2 Theory: Self-Limiting Growth, Discrete Maps 378
19.3 Assessment: Properties of Nonlinear Maps 380
19.4 Exploration: Bifurcation Diagram, BugSort.java* 381
19.5 Exploration: Other Discrete Maps* 384

Chapter 20. 2-D Arrays: File I/O, PDEs; Realistic Capacitor 385
20.1 Problem: Field of Realistic Capacitor 385
20.2 Theory and Model: Electrostatics and PDEs 385
20.3 Algorithm: Finite Differences 387
20.4 Implementation: Laplace.java 389
20.5 Exploration: 2-D Capacitor 391
20.6 Exploration: 3-D Capacitor* 393
20.7 Key Words 393

Chapter 21. Web Computing, Applets, Primitive Graphics 394
21.1 What Is Web Computing? 394
21.2 Implementation: Get This to Work First 396
21.3 Exploration: Modify Applet1.java 401
21.4 Extension: PtPlot as Applet* 402
21.5 Extension: Applet with Button Input* 403
21.6 Extension: AWT, JFC, and Swing* 405
21.7 Example: Baton Applet, Jparabola.java* 407
21.8 Key Words 410
21.9 Supplementary Exercises 410

PART 3. LATEX SURVIVAL GUIDE 411

Chapter 22. LATEX for Text 413
22.1 Why LATEX? 413
22.2 Structure of a LATEXDocument 414
22.3 Sample Input File (Sample.tex) 414
22.4 Sample LATEXOutput 416
22.5 Fonts for Text 420
22.6 Environments 422
22.7 Lists 422
22.8 Sections 425

Chapter 23. LATEX for Mathematics 427
23.1 Entering Mathematics: Math Mode 427
23.2 Mathematical Symbols and Greek 428
23.3 Math Accents 431
23.4 Superscripts and Subscripts 431
23.5 Calculus and Sums 431
23.6 Changing Math Fonts 432
23.7 Math Functions 432
23.8 Fractions 432
23.9 Roots 433
23.10 Brackets (Delimiters) 433
23.11 Multiline Equations 434
23.12 Matrices and Math Arrays 435
23.13 Including Graphics 436
23.14 Exercise: Putting It All Together 438

Appendix A. Glossary 441
Appendix B. Maple Quick Reference, Debugging Help 450
Appendix C. Java Quick Reference and Installing Software 461
C.1 Java Elements 461
C.2 Transferring Files from the CD 465
C.3 Using our Maple Worksheets 466
C.4 Using our Java Programs 466
C.5 Installing PtPlot (or Other) Packages 467
C.6 Installing Java Developer’s Kit 469

Bibliography 471
Index 477

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)