A Framework for Understanding Poverty / Edition 1

A Framework for Understanding Poverty / Edition 1

3.4 23
by Ruby K. Payne
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1929229488

ISBN-13: 9781929229482

Pub. Date: 05/10/2005

Publisher: aha! Process, Incorporated

How does poverty impact learning, work habits and decision-making? People in poverty face challenges virtually unknown to those in middle class or wealth—challenges from both obvious and hidden sources. The reality of being poor brings out a survival mentality, and turns attention away from opportunities taken for granted by everyone else.

Overview

How does poverty impact learning, work habits and decision-making? People in poverty face challenges virtually unknown to those in middle class or wealth—challenges from both obvious and hidden sources. The reality of being poor brings out a survival mentality, and turns attention away from opportunities taken for granted by everyone else.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781929229482
Publisher:
aha! Process, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/10/2005
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
216
Product dimensions:
9.90(w) x 7.00(h) x 0.50(d)

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A Framework for Understanding Poverty 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 23 reviews.
2ide_cyclops More than 1 year ago
As Sarah Palin is to energy policy so too goes Payne. Using data "sources" as robust as Palin's "you can see Russia" Payne's robust portrait of stereotypical poverty is well-fortified to resonate with everyone who feels that poor people are largely responsible for being poor. Like Palin who believes energy problems are solved by strategies such as "drill baby drill," Payne argues that the poor would stop being poor if they simply learned a few tricks from the middle class. Disregard the fact that in both cases--there is no evidence to support the potential success of either. For those of you who think I'm making this up--try reading "The Origins of the Urban Crisis" by Thomas Sugrue who provides a real evidence-based account for how poverty works and is sustained by the larger society. Payne's account simply absolves everyone but those in poverty for their situation. While anyone can find examples of stupid poor people--so can anyone find examples of stupid middle-class and wealthy folks. The genius of Payne is to claim a research basis for blaming all poor people as having a common culture of poverty. Thus, no one has to change but those who are poor. The systematic pressures of society that continue to keep poor people poor are not acknowledged nor even hinted at in Payne's work. She is likely well-intentioned, as is Palin--but both are dangerous voices in debates that require much more informed perspectives. Read this book if you want to feel better about blaming poor people. And if you want to know what Payne "learned" from her husband (who once was poor) and her individual experience in schools--this book is a fair account. However, if you want to know more about poverty--read something that looks beyond a single person's experience. This is what systematic research does--and Payne has not done any research here. She talks about "data" as if she collected some. She hasn't. By her standard, I've "collected" data my whole life to show that shoes wear out in 5-6 months. Does that mean that all shoes wear out for everyone like that? Would you count that as "data?" As someone remarked, the "plural of anecdote is not data." And anecdotal information as loosely examined as does Payne creates a comfortable book for those who want quick answers to difficult and complex problems. One last thing--this book is self-published. So when it says Payne is "The Leading U.S. Expert on the Mindsets of Poverty, Middle Class, and Wealth" it's Payne who is declaring herself #1. It also means when you read the "Publisher's Review" that she is commenting on her own book as if she's a third-party publisher. By any measure, she's sold a lot of books, but "Thighmasters" sold well too--it doesn't mean the book is high quality. Payne even claims that selling books is a form of peer review--I think it means she's simply sold a lot of books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought that this was a good supplement to Ruby Payne's workshop. She has a lot of ideas that make sense and clear up some of the loose ends when dealing with different socioeconomic backgrounds. It's a lot of good information. I'm still ruminating over it, though. I'm trying to figure out how to apply it to my classroom.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ever wonder why people who win the lottery often end up in worse shape after they win than before? It's often because our lives are governed by the way we perceive the world and think. Our social networks, entertainment, perception of resources, and so on shape our interactions with others and with the world. There is literally a different culture in generational poverty than in the 'middle class' or among the wealthy. And moving across cultural strata is not so simple as just having or not having money. I've often wondered why 'in my experience' it can be so hard to help those in need - specifically, those who seem to be living in generational poverty. Sure, I can give a few dollars to help with an urgent situation such as getting the electricity turned back on but I have often felt powerless to help bring real, lasting change to people in need. Ruby Payne addresses these issues in a powerful way. Her research and understanding make hear a well- qualified leader and her suggestions have helped shape my ability to be more effective. I've found this book to be so good that I have recommended this book to many of my friends and colleagues. In fact, I have loaned out copies. -- Bryan Entzminger
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is an eye-opener for those who think they know it all and for those who just have no clue about what poverty really is. The title of the book really explains it all, 'A Framework for Understanding Poverty.' Dr. Payne's descriptive and detailed information about the characteristics of poverty to creating a relationship with students from poverty is profound and useful to any educators. I've found many of her strategies to be simple, easy to comprehend, and pratical to implement in the classroom.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am a white, middle class school teacher, and every time I leave a (required) discussion of this book I'm angry and offended. Stereo-types abound. An eye-opener, yes. I'm now very aware of the classism in our schools.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a must-read for any one involved in education or interested to learn what it will take to improve our educational system.   Ruby Payne addresses the root causes head on and provides practical ideas for change.  The path we're on as a nation is not  working, I wish all those who believe excessive standardized testing is the answer would read this for a few new ideas.
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NO NOOK AVAILABLE???
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is an education for those who believe there are no (or should be no) differences among socio-economic classes. Take the surveys inside and see if you could function easily in poverty, middle class, or wealth. There are significant differences that need to be recognized by educators, so they understand the fundamental differences of their students. Not wanting to admit there are differences, or simply being judgmental, perpetuates the ignorance within our educational system.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
If we are to be understood, we must first seek to understand, only then will we be able to develop strategies to successfully teach students living in poverty. Until we do, students will continue to drop out of school and our country will continue to slip on the world's academic ladder.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Opening the reader's eyes to the culture-bound assumptions that cause miscommunication between educators and students and their families. If you ever have a chance to go and hear the author in person, don't miss it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an incredible tool and a must-have for educators social workers, clergy and those who work with the public. The insights are not overly generalized nor are they racist (as many others have been). This book not only helps us understand 'them' (those in poverty/middle class/wealth), but helps us understand ourselves better as well. Thank God for giving Dr. Payne this insight!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dr. Payne has hit the nail on the head. She has effectively defined poverty and it's results in schools and communities. She draws upon the expertise of others (including Grinder, Feuerstein, and Clay) with a great teacher-friendly text!
RebeccaScaglione More than 1 year ago
Everyone encounters people of different socioeconomic levels. What am I talking about? To be direct: people from poverty, wealth, and middle class, all based on financial means. A Framework For Understanding Poverty by Ruby Payne is a nonfiction guide tounderstanding these differences in socioeconomic levels and learning how these differences shape people’s lives. While the book is geared mainly towards teachers of low income students and has the main goal of making sure that all students are successful in school, gaining an understanding of class levels and characteristics of them is something that would be helpful to anyone. Some interesting facts from the book: “An education is the key to getting out of, and staying out of, generational poverty” – p. 61 There are hidden rules of each class that make it obvious to “insiders” if you belong or not. For instance (an example, not meaning that this is how it is in EVERY household): In poverty, the valued possessions are people. In middle class, valued possessions are things. In wealth, valued possessions are one-of-a-kind objects, legacies, and pedigrees. (pp. 42-43) Hidden rules need to be taught and can be done so with a fabulous analogy: You need to learn the rules in order to play the game. To move from poverty to middle class, you need to learn the hidden rules. That way, you can move up to middle class if you would like to, but if you don’t know the rules (like the middle class hidden rules) then you can’t play the game (p. 86). This book is more textbook-like, although it is easy to understand. It’s a great guide for teachers, parents, childcare workers, especially anyone who works with children from poverty because of all the great tips included for improving education. Thanks for reading, Rebecca @ Love at First Book
Foggy75 More than 1 year ago
Fast shipping Book in great condition
rachel44 More than 1 year ago
Sugar's 'The Silent Crisis Destroying America's Brightest Minds" is a book that is all about educational reality, the facts on the ground, not vacuous educational theories. Sugar pioneered the SMARTGRADES school notebooks that contain the new learning technology, ACANDY Processing Tools, that empower students for academic success. She transformed my kids into Grade A students, so I speak from experience, not hypothetical theory. It is not all about teaching, it is all about learning.