A Front of Brass

A Front of Brass

by Fred Merrick White
     
 

Hubert Grant stood on the veranda looking over the garden at Ledge
Point. Just for the moment he was glad enough to be alone. He wanted
to stand there and contemplate his new possession. Everything there
was his--the rainbow trout in the pool in the Dutch garden, the
starry flowers of the anemones in the larch woods behind the house.
And he had…  See more details below

Overview

Hubert Grant stood on the veranda looking over the garden at Ledge
Point. Just for the moment he was glad enough to be alone. He wanted
to stand there and contemplate his new possession. Everything there
was his--the rainbow trout in the pool in the Dutch garden, the
starry flowers of the anemones in the larch woods behind the house.
And he had paid for it all with his own hard-earned money!

Ledge Point was his ideal of what a country retreat should be. The
house was modern, no doubt, but the fact had its advantages, and the
rambling white front was covered with a tender green that presently
would bear its tribute of blossoms. The big houseplace opened on two
sides into a conservatory where the flowers gleamed all the year
round. Here were treasures of oak and china and silver gathered by
the late owner for many years. To the left was a cosy study; on the
right a drawing-room in white and carmine charmingly furnished.
Grant's eyes softened a little as he thought of the drawing-room. May
Leverton would be presiding over that some of these early days.

Grant had bought the place as much for her as for himself. He had
purchased it only a few days before just as it stood, from his
partner old Paul Spencer, and he had paid for it with a cheque drawn
upon his own private account.

"I'm selling it you cheap," Mr. Spencer had said. "Four thousand
pounds is very little. The house cost more than that, to say nothing
of the furniture. Ledge Point has been a hobby of mine, as you know,
but I shall not need it any more. My doctor tells me that I must live
almost entirely in the South of France in future. That means
practically giving the whole control of the business into your hands,
Grant."

"No hurry for that, sir," Grant hastened to say.

"Perhaps not. But still it has to be done. We must have a big talk
over the money side of affairs before long. I've always looked after
the money department, as you know. That was part of our original
contract. Why, for all you may know to the contrary, the firm of
Spencer and Grant may be on the verge of bankruptcy."

Hubert Grant smiled at the suggestion. "I certainly have not worried
about that," he said. "There is nobody whose name for sound finance
stands higher than yours."

"All the same, you will have to know very shortly, Grant. You are
inclined to trust people just a little too far. For instance, it
would have been far wiser if you had refrained from paying me for
this place till after the conveyance was signed. If anything went
wrong with me you would simply lose your money."

Grant smiled again. He was not in a business mood at that moment.

"After all, one can't live entirely without sentiment," he said. "I
had a whim to call this place mine. And if I can't trust you, who am
I to put my faith in?"

"You have some thought of getting married, I suppose?"

Grant's face flushed slightly. The lines about his square firm jaw
hardened. His was not exactly a handsome face, but the regular
features were attractive. He had, moreover, that suggestion of
physical and moral strength that goes so far with most women. They
know by instinct that here was a man who would not fail in the hour
of trial, who would stand before the world with a front of brass. He
stood upon the veranda in fine contract to his companion.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013745018
Publisher:
WDS Publishing
Publication date:
01/13/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
137 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >