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A Genealogical Chart of Greek Mythology
     

A Genealogical Chart of Greek Mythology

by Harold Newman (Compiler), Jon O. Newman (Compiler)
 

This unique work is the first comprehensive genealogical chart of virtually all of the named figures of Greek mythology that can be shown to be related. The product of more than 35 years of research, the book includes a 72-page continuous chart that links 3,673 named figures into a single "family tree" spanning 20 generations and an 80-page index that provides a

Overview

This unique work is the first comprehensive genealogical chart of virtually all of the named figures of Greek mythology that can be shown to be related. The product of more than 35 years of research, the book includes a 72-page continuous chart that links 3,673 named figures into a single "family tree" spanning 20 generations and an 80-page index that provides a citation to an authoritative ancient source for each relationship.

The genealogy begins with Chaos and—based on works by Hesiod, Homer, Aeschylus, Pindar, Bacchylides, Herodotus, Euripides, Apollodorus, Pausanias, Diodorus Siculus, and scores of other ancient poets, playwrights, and writers—continues down through the Titans, the gods, legendary kings, and such well-known figures of literature as Odysseus, Jason, Antigone, and Helen of Troy, as well as hundreds of obscure figures, including their spouses, paramours, children, and descendants.

The chart shows all of the known relationships—parental, marital, and extramarital—of each figure. In addition to furnishing a citation for each relationship, the index provides brief descriptive information and indicates the quadrant and page of the continuous chart where the relationship is depicted. A two-page master chart illustrates the relationships among the principal figures.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"A major contribution to our understanding of how ancient Greeks organized the vast corpus of figures constituting what we call Greek mythology.
(Timothy Gantz, from the Foreword)"
Choice
The Newmans' chart . . . should be in any collection supporting research in classical studies.
The New Yorker
You wait thousands of years for a family tree of all the Greek gods, and then two come along at once. The first, A Genealogical Chart of Greek Mythology, began in 1964 as the hobby of the late Harold Newman and was recently completed by Jon O. Newman, his son. An enterprise of Daedalian complexity, the complete chart spreads along seventy-two huge pages and contains 3,673 mythological figures, all interrelated and ultimately descended from Chaos, a primal force mentioned by Hesiod who is the great-great-grandparent of Zeus. The sexual activity of classical deities does not lend itself to neat tabulation; Zeus and Apollo, notoriously promiscuous, appear with alarming frequency. Undeterred, the Newmans (both lawyers) list alternate kinships in the index and maintain that there is a "high degree of generational consistency," so that, for instance, many of the participants in the Trojan War seem to be "within just two generations of each other."

A less forbidding version appears next month in the form of The Genealogy of Greek Mythology, by Vanessa James (Gotham). James eliminates some of the more arcane characters and includes illustrations and short explanatory paragraphs alongside the names. Printed on one long concertinalike page, the table can be read like a book or unfolded into a seventeen-foot-long frieze -- gods on one side, mortals on the other. Simplification has its benefits; the knotty ways of Greek heredity can ensnare even the most organized mind. As James comments with tactful understatement, "The Greek practice of marrying nieces to their uncles further confuses strict distinctions between generations."( Leo Carey)
Times Literary Supplement
A surprisingly happy book to use.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807827901
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
06/30/2003
Edition description:
1
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
16.00(w) x 10.75(h) x 0.90(d)

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
A surprisingly happy book to use.—Times Literary Supplement

A major contribution to our understanding of how ancient Greeks organized the vast corpus of figures constituting what we call Greek mythology. . . . I am quite grateful to have it at my disposal.—Timothy Gantz, from the Foreword

A unique reference resource, invaluable to those working with Greek mythology. A must-purchase for college and research libraries.—Jeffrey Kaimowitz, Watkinson Library, Trinity College

A Genealogical Chart of Greek Mythology provides something absolutely new in the world of scholarship and reference: a meticulously researched resource which places 3,673 named mythological figures from the surviving classical Greek literary corpus in a coherent genealogical context. . . . The scope of the work is breathtaking, and its organization brilliantly realized. . . . Anyone who has undertaken research in classical or humanist literature or Renaissance painting knows how difficult, often impossible, it is to sort out the family and extra-marital relationships among mythological characters. This long-overdue, very authoritative reference book should find a place in every research and academic library.—Elizabeth L. Diefendorf, Frederick Phineas and Sandra Priest Rose Chief Librarian, General Research Division, New York Public Library

Exhaustive. . . . Embrace[s] the entirety of Greek myth. . . . The layout and typography are of quite stunning complexity and elegance. The ingenuity, research, decision-making and interminable grind at intractable (and often incompatible) testimony that ha[s] gone into [this] truly Herculean labor almost def[ies] comprehension.—Los Angeles Times Book Review

This book [is] an indespensable tool for every classicist who works in the field of mythology. It should find its way on the shelves of each Classics department as a standard reference book.—Scholia Reviews

The Newmans' chart . . . should be in any collection supporting research in classical studies.—Choice

Meet the Author

The late Harold Newman was a lawyer and author of four dictionaries in the field of decorative arts.

Jon O. Newman is a federal appellate judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York City. He lives in Connecticut.

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