A Girl Named Summer [NOOK Book]

Overview

A timeless romance from New York Times bestseller Julie Garwood, a tale for mothers to share with their daughters, and for women to remember what it feels like to fall in love for the very first time.



Summer never meant to lie. She just wanted to keep the most perfect guy she ever met interested in her. She had been surprised when David began hanging out with her every ...
See more details below
A Girl Named Summer

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$3.99
BN.com price

Overview

A timeless romance from New York Times bestseller Julie Garwood, a tale for mothers to share with their daughters, and for women to remember what it feels like to fall in love for the very first time.



Summer never meant to lie. She just wanted to keep the most perfect guy she ever met interested in her. She had been surprised when David began hanging out with her every day… and dizzy with happiness when he kissed her. David seemed to like her uniconventional Irish family, even her eccentric Grandpa. Everything was going great - until Ann entered the picture. She collected boys like trophies. How could Summer compete with someone like that?


Before she knew it, Summer was boasting to David about her passion for long-distance running. She never dreamed he'd enter them in a six-mile race. Summer dreaded the moment when he would discover the truth: she couldn't run six blocks. And the flirtatious Ann was already working on David. Then Summer's Grandpa came up with a plan that was just crazy enough to save the day….

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-In this light romance, 15-year-old Summer falls hard for athletic, preppy David; loses him to an unworthy, manipulative female foe; and then wins him back. The twist here is the dilemma that arises when Summer tries to impress David by overstating her running experience and is found out. With the encouragement of her grandfather, she trains for and competes in a major race even after her romance has soured. The plotting is predictable and the dialogue clich d: Summer's rival bats "her eyelashes furiously." Other characters seem made-to-order, such as Summer's cute three-year-old brother and her eccentric but lovable grandfather. The teen males are easily manipulated and never seem to struggle with the issues of self-image faced by the other sex. But why quibble? Meaningful values are imparted: Summer learns the importance of honesty and effort while building self-esteem and confidence in her running ability. By the end of the novel, her ties with her family are reinforced and her relationship with David is secure. Though flawed, this is a respectable entry in a genre that is popular among female teen readers.-Mary Ann Carcich, Brooklyn Public Library, NY
School Library Journal
Faced with a boring summer, Summer is ecstatic when she meets Dave at a bingo parlor. The snake in the grass is Ann, who schemes to take him away and who corners Summer into lying about her athletic prowess. Trapped, she has to train for a 10K race. Not unexpectedly, she comes to love running for its own sake, wins the race, and regains Dave from Ann's clutches. Nothing extra here, just the standard wish fulfillment, but the eccentric Grandpa is fun, and the running angle isn't bad.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101603536
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 6/26/2012
  • Series: e-Initial
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 1
  • Sales rank: 39,524
  • Age range: 12 - 15 Years
  • File size: 319 KB

Meet the Author

Julie Garwood
Julie Garwood is the author of numerous New York Times bestsellers, including The Ideal Man, Sizzle, Fire and Ice, Shadow Music, Shadow Dance, and Slow Burn. She lives near Kansas City.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

"Mother, does Michael have to wear that towel all the time?" Summer Matthews muttered. She knelt down in front of her three-year-old brother and looked him squarely in the eye while she snapped the oversized safety pin in position just below his chin.

"I can't be Superman without my cape," Michael replied. He frowned until the spray of freckles across the bridge of his nose became one brown streak. "Everyone knows you gots to wear a cape if you're going to be Superman," he continued in a tone that suggested his older sister was definitely simpleminded.

"Of course you do, dear, and it's 'have to wear,' not 'gots to wear,'" their mother answered.

Summer glanced up and watched her mother hunt through her gigantic purse. She's lost her keys again, Summer thought in exasperation.

"Mother, at least make him take off those ridiculous boots while he's in the house," she pleaded. She turned back to her brother and slipped the bright red towel over his small shoulders. "Michael, winter boots are terrific when you want to play in the snow, but it just happens to be June."

From the belligerent expression on Michael's face, Summer concluded that her cool logic wasn't making a dent, so she tried another approach. "Your feet are going to get all shriveled up and fall off if you don't let some air get to them," she warned in an ominous voice.

The threat didn't faze him. But then, her little brother wasn't easily intimidated. "Superman always wears red boots," he proclaimed. He rolled his eyes heavenward, just the way Grandpa did when he was exasperated, and folded his arms in a militant manner across his chest. He was obviously in oneof his stubborn moods, Summer finally realized, and she sighed in defeat.

"Summer, don't tease your brother," their mother admonished as she continued to pull items out of her purse.

"I give up," Summer said. "Your keys are on the dining room table," she added as an afterthought. "I just remembered seeing them there."

"Why, of course they are," her mother exclaimed with a grin. "Michael, you be a good boy and obey your sister while she's in charge. Summer, don't forget to give your grandfather his medicine at three o'clock. It's on top of the refrigerator."

"Tell her I get to wear my boots," Michael demanded.

"Of course you must wear your boots," their mother agreed. "But please take them off during naptime."

"You win, half-pint," Summer said.

After a quick hug and kiss for Michael and a peck on the cheek for Summer, their mother scooped up her keys from the table and hurried out the door.

As soon as they were alone, Summer turned to her brother. "Come on, I'll fix your lunch."

"No." It was an automatic response, a word Michael had grown quite fond of lately, but Summer didn't pay any attention and went into the kitchen. Michael followed her, hovering in the doorway while he watched her fix his sandwich.

"I'm not hungry," he stubbornly protested when she placed the sandwich on the table.

"Yes, you are," Summer answered. She lifted him up and settled him in his chair before he could continue his rebellion, then sat down opposite him.

"I won't eat."

Summer pretended a bored yawn and shrugged. She had learned the hard way to act as if she couldn't care less when she really wanted something from Michael. One had to be an amateur psychologist when dealing with three-year-olds.

"Quit making squishes in your sandwich," she scolded him.

Michael looked at Summer. "Why are you so mad?" he asked.

"Mad? I'm not mad, Michael. Why should I be mad? My entire summer vacation is completely ruined, but that shouldn't make me mad, now should it?"

Wide blue eyes stared at her; they were replicas of her own. Although they looked very much like sister and brother, Michael's hair was the color of the carrot slice he was stabbing into his sandwich, while Summer's hair was a golden blond.

"Quit staring at me and eat." Summer was in a rotten mood. "Life is the pits, Michael. Regina finally got her dad to let us work at the Pizza Paddle he owns, and now I have to stay home with you and Grandpa!

"Why am I sitting here trying to discuss my problems with a three-year-old?" Summer suddenly asked herself. Good grief, she was getting as strange as the rest of her family! And they were strange. She had come to that conclusion years ago, even before Grandpa had moved in with them. She loved all of them dearly, but sometimes their behavior embarrassed her.

Her father put in long hours at his flower shop and truly seemed to enjoy his work, but, honestly, sometimes their house looked like the city botanical gardens. He told her he brought home only the plants that needed "special attention," and she could understand that, but did he have to talk to them? Every day as he watered and fertilized them, he moved from one to the other offering praise and encouragement. If people outside her family observed this ritual, Summer was confident they'd think he'd lost his mind.

Her mother, on the other hand, was so busy trying to keep up with the family and the house and the shop that she sometimes tended to be a little absentminded. Once, she'd left work late and had quickly stopped at the supermarket to buy a few things for dinner. When she arrived home, she turned to retrieve the bags from the backseat of her car, only to find that they weren't there. Later, she confessed that she'd had so much running through her mind she'd forgotten the groceries and had actually left them sitting in the cart at the supermarket parking lot.

And then there was Summer's grandfather. He spent almost every waking hour down in the basement working on his inventions. He hadn't lived with them very long, but he fit right in with her eccentric family. They had become so accustomed to the loud noises coming from below they didn't even react anymore.

"Anybody home?" The call from the front door interrupted Summer's thoughts, and the high-pitched voice of Regina Morgan, her best friend, brought a smile to her face.

"Come in," Summer yelled. "We're in the kitchen."

Regina bounded into the room but didn't stop until she was hunting through the refrigerator.

"Hungry?" Summer teased. It was a joke, of course. Regina was always hungry.

Regina shrugged a reply. She crossed over to the kitchen table with an apple in one hand and a can of grape soda in the other and plopped down with all the grace of a skinny giraffe. "Hi, Mike. Summer, I just got back from my checkup at the doctor's, and I grew another inch," Regina mumbled between bites of apple. "I'm going to be an amazon, I just know it."

"No, you're not," Summer said with heartfelt sympathy. She knew how awkward Regina felt about her height and wanted to help her feel better. After all, they were best friends. "When the boys catch up with you..."

"Summer, I measured five feet, eight and a half inches." She visibly winced the admission. "Maybe I should try out for the boys' basketball team."

"Don't be silly. You'd kill yourself. There isn't a coordinated bone in your body," Summer replied with complete honesty. She knew she wasn't hurting Regina's feelings. They were too close. Besides, it was the truth. "Anyway, you're going to be a model, remember? And it's good for models to be tall and thin, and --"

"-- flat-chested," Regina supplied, "which I most definitely am. Let's change the subject. This is depressing. Where is everyone? It's actually quiet."

"Mom's working at the flower shop with Dad, and Grandpa is --"

"-- in the basement," Regina added. She had the habit of finishing Summer's sentences for her, and sometimes the trait bothered Summer, but not today. "Has he finished his remote-control vacuum cleaner?"

Regina understood about Grandpa. And she never laughed. That was one of the reasons she was her best friend, Summer acknowledged. She really understood.

"I think so, but he hasn't tried it out upstairs yet. He's working on car chains today."

Regina nodded, and they both smiled. Yes, Regina definitely understood Summer's family.

"Can I go next door and play with Andy?" Michael interrupted with a loud, proud burp.

Usually Michael went right down for his nap after lunch, but Summer wanted to visit with Regina before hassling with her brother. "For a little while, if you finish your sandwich," she started to answer, but he was already running out the back door.

Summer turned to her friend. "There's no easy way to tell you this, Regina," Summer said. "Mom has to work with Dad all summer. Mrs. Nelson is going to have a baby, and she took the whole three months off."

"You're kidding! What about working at the Pizza Paddle?"

"I can't," Summer mumbled.

"Summer, do you realize how much time and effort went into my nagging Dad until he agreed to let us work there?"

Summer sat in dejected silence while she considered her bleak future. There wasn't any hope, she decided. What other fifteen-year-old girl stayed home all summer? Probably none. And this was the summer that she and Regina had vowed they would make some new friends and meet some really cute older guys. They had both agreed to turn over a new leaf, too, starting with their looks. Summer had decided that her wardrobe was entirely too juvenile, for one thing. The money she'd been planning to make at the Pizza Paddle would have enabled her to buy some really great clothes. Well, that was definitely out now. Mom and Dad couldn't afford to pay her more than a few dollars a week for baby-sitting. It would take her most of the summer just to have enough to buy new jeans!

"You're going to be stuck here all summer?"

Regina made it sound as if Summer had been sentenced to Siberia. Of course, taking care of Michael and her grandfather was probably just as bad, Summer thought, then immediately felt guilty.

"But what about our plans?" Regina's stubborn streak was asserting itself. She was just as disappointed as Summer, and that fact made Summer feel somewhat better. "You'll never meet anyone if you don't get out there and circulate. That's what is so super about working at the Pizza Paddle. Everyone goes there on Friday nights. You know that!"

"I know, I know," Summer said. "But there isn't anything I can do about it. I tried to talk to Dad, but when he started his 'A Family Is a Team' lecture, I knew it was a lost cause."

"Ann Logan is having a swim party next week," Regina said, changing the subject.

"Oh, how splendid." Summer's voice reeked with sarcasm. Splendid was one of Ann's favorite words, and Ann was one of Summer's least favorite persons.

"Your claws are showing," Regina said with a giggle. "Just because she stole Eric from you..."

"Don't start," Summer demanded. "And she did not steal him from me. I never had him to begin with, remember? That was all in your mind."

Ann Logan was definitely a thorn in Summer's side. As soon as Ann had found out Summer was interested in Eric, she'd moved right in. Eric was helpless before Ann's practiced assault. He never stood a chance.

"Do you think she uses something on her hair? It's getting more and more streaked, I noticed."

"Who cares? She still looks like a Barbie doll with that plastic smile of hers. And the way she bats those lashes, you'd think she had a tic or something."

"Well, she has to be nice to me," Regina said. "She still hasn't given up on Gregg."

"How can your brother stand her? Honestly, Michael has a better vocabulary than she does, and she acts so...phony. I don't think she can hold a serious thought for more than ten seconds." The disgust was obvious in Summer's voice.

"Oh, all the boys like to have girls gush over them. That's our problem, Summer. We just aren't gushy enough. Anyway, I was invited to the party because of Gregg, that's for sure. We both know she really doesn't like me. She doesn't like any girl, for that matter. Maybe I won't go if you're not invited."

"You have to go. This will be the perfect opportunity for you to meet some new boys. With Ann's reputation to maintain, I'm sure there will be an abundance of --"

"-- gorgeous guys surrounding her," Regina said. "We're supposed to bring dates," Regina added. "I guess I could ask Carl Benson. He's tall enough. If only he didn't tend to lisp..."

"He does not lisp," Summer argued. "And if he does, it's because of his braces. Besides, once you get there, you can --"

"-- circulate," Regina finished for her. "You're right. I'll ask Carl. I wish you were going though. I...Wait! I've got it! You can go with Gregg."

"Oh, I don't know --"

"He'll do it," Regina interrupted, a glint entering her brown eyes. "He owes me, Summer. I'll tell him tonight."

"Let me think about it first," Summer stalled.

"Look, we both said we need to take advantage of every opportunity if we're going to change our images. Hermits don't meet many new people. Think about that."

"Okay, okay."

"I have to go. I'll call you later."

"Fine," Summer replied. She followed Regina to the front door, dodging toy cars and trucks along the way. It would take her most of the afternoon to clean up Michael's mess. And he'd made the clutter in less than ten minutes.

"Want to do something tonight?" Regina asked.

"Can't. It's bingo night."

"Poor Summer...Maybe your grandfather won't want to go tonight."

When it snows in July, Summer thought. "No chance. And don't say 'Poor Summer,'" she demanded. "I feel bad enough as it is."

Copyright © 1986 by Julie Garwood

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

"Mother, does Michael have to wear that towel all the time?" Summer Matthews muttered. She knelt down in front of her three-year-old brother and looked him squarely in the eye while she snapped the oversized safety pin in position just below his chin.

"I can't be Superman without my cape," Michael replied. He frowned until the spray of freckles across the bridge of his nose became one brown streak. "Everyone knows you gots to wear a cape if you're going to be Superman," he continued in a tone that suggested his older sister was definitely simpleminded.

"Of course you do, dear, and it's 'have to wear,' not 'gots to wear,'" their mother answered.

Summer glanced up and watched her mother hunt through her gigantic purse. She's lost her keys again, Summer thought in exasperation.

"Mother, at least make him take off those ridiculous boots while he's in the house," she pleaded. She turned back to her brother and slipped the bright red towel over his small shoulders. "Michael, winter boots are terrific when you want to play in the snow, but it just happens to be June."

From the belligerent expression on Michael's face, Summer concluded that her cool logic wasn't making a dent, so she tried another approach. "Your feet are going to get all shriveled up and fall off if you don't let some air get to them," she warned in an ominous voice.

The threat didn't faze him. But then, her little brother wasn't easily intimidated. "Superman always wears red boots," he proclaimed. He rolled his eyes heavenward, just the way Grandpa did when he was exasperated, and folded his arms in a militant manner across his chest. He was obviously in one of his stubborn moods, Summer finally realized, and she sighed in defeat.

"Summer, don't tease your brother," their mother admonished as she continued to pull items out of her purse.

"I give up," Summer said. "Your keys are on the dining room table," she added as an afterthought. "I just remembered seeing them there."

"Why, of course they are," her mother exclaimed with a grin. "Michael, you be a good boy and obey your sister while she's in charge. Summer, don't forget to give your grandfather his medicine at three o'clock. It's on top of the refrigerator."

"Tell her I get to wear my boots," Michael demanded.

"Of course you must wear your boots," their mother agreed. "But please take them off during naptime."

"You win, half-pint," Summer said.

After a quick hug and kiss for Michael and a peck on the cheek for Summer, their mother scooped up her keys from the table and hurried out the door.

As soon as they were alone, Summer turned to her brother. "Come on, I'll fix your lunch."

"No." It was an automatic response, a word Michael had grown quite fond of lately, but Summer didn't pay any attention and went into the kitchen. Michael followed her, hovering in the doorway while he watched her fix his sandwich.

"I'm not hungry," he stubbornly protested when she placed the sandwich on the table.

"Yes, you are," Summer answered. She lifted him up and settled him in his chair before he could continue his rebellion, then sat down opposite him.

"I won't eat."

Summer pretended a bored yawn and shrugged. She had learned the hard way to act as if she couldn't care less when she really wanted something from Michael. One had to be an amateur psychologist when dealing with three-year-olds.

"Quit making squishes in your sandwich," she scolded him.

Michael looked at Summer. "Why are you so mad?" he asked.

"Mad? I'm not mad, Michael. Why should I be mad? My entire summer vacation is completely ruined, but that shouldn't make me mad, now should it?"

Wide blue eyes stared at her; they were replicas of her own. Although they looked very much like sister and brother, Michael's hair was the color of the carrot slice he was stabbing into his sandwich, while Summer's hair was a golden blond.

"Quit staring at me and eat." Summer was in a rotten mood. "Life is the pits, Michael. Regina finally got her dad to let us work at the Pizza Paddle he owns, and now I have to stay home with you and Grandpa!

"Why am I sitting here trying to discuss my problems with a three-year-old?" Summer suddenly asked herself. Good grief, she was getting as strange as the rest of her family! And they were strange. She had come to that conclusion years ago, even before Grandpa had moved in with them. She loved all of them dearly, but sometimes their behavior embarrassed her.

Her father put in long hours at his flower shop and truly seemed to enjoy his work, but, honestly, sometimes their house looked like the city botanical gardens. He told her he brought home only the plants that needed "special attention," and she could understand that, but did he have to talk to them? Every day as he watered and fertilized them, he moved from one to the other offering praise and encouragement. If people outside her family observed this ritual, Summer was confident they'd think he'd lost his mind.

Her mother, on the other hand, was so busy trying to keep up with the family and the house and the shop that she sometimes tended to be a little absentminded. Once, she'd left work late and had quickly stopped at the supermarket to buy a few things for dinner. When she arrived home, she turned to retrieve the bags from the backseat of her car, only to find that they weren't there. Later, she confessed that she'd had so much running through her mind she'd forgotten the groceries and had actually left them sitting in the cart at the supermarket parking lot.

And then there was Summer's grandfather. He spent almost every waking hour down in the basement working on his inventions. He hadn't lived with them very long, but he fit right in with her eccentric family. They had become so accustomed to the loud noises coming from below they didn't even react anymore.

"Anybody home?" The call from the front door interrupted Summer's thoughts, and the high-pitched voice of Regina Morgan, her best friend, brought a smile to her face.

"Come in," Summer yelled. "We're in the kitchen."

Regina bounded into the room but didn't stop until she was hunting through the refrigerator.

"Hungry?" Summer teased. It was a joke, of course. Regina was always hungry.

Regina shrugged a reply. She crossed over to the kitchen table with an apple in one hand and a can of grape soda in the other and plopped down with all the grace of a skinny giraffe. "Hi, Mike. Summer, I just got back from my checkup at the doctor's, and I grew another inch," Regina mumbled between bites of apple. "I'm going to be an amazon, I just know it."

"No, you're not," Summer said with heartfelt sympathy. She knew how awkward Regina felt about her height and wanted to help her feel better. After all, they were best friends. "When the boys catch up with you..."

"Summer, I measured five feet, eight and a half inches." She visibly winced the admission. "Maybe I should try out for the boys' basketball team."

"Don't be silly. You'd kill yourself. There isn't a coordinated bone in your body," Summer replied with complete honesty. She knew she wasn't hurting Regina's feelings. They were too close. Besides, it was the truth. "Anyway, you're going to be a model, remember? And it's good for models to be tall and thin, and --"

"-- flat-chested," Regina supplied, "which I most definitely am. Let's change the subject. This is depressing. Where is everyone? It's actually quiet."

"Mom's working at the flower shop with Dad, and Grandpa is --"

"-- in the basement," Regina added. She had the habit of finishing Summer's sentences for her, and sometimes the trait bothered Summer, but not today. "Has he finished his remote-control vacuum cleaner?"

Regina understood about Grandpa. And she never laughed. That was one of the reasons she was her best friend, Summer acknowledged. She really understood.

"I think so, but he hasn't tried it out upstairs yet. He's working on car chains today."

Regina nodded, and they both smiled. Yes, Regina definitely understood Summer's family.

"Can I go next door and play with Andy?" Michael interrupted with a loud, proud burp.

Usually Michael went right down for his nap after lunch, but Summer wanted to visit with Regina before hassling with her brother. "For a little while, if you finish your sandwich," she started to answer, but he was already running out the back door.

Summer turned to her friend. "There's no easy way to tell you this, Regina," Summer said. "Mom has to work with Dad all summer. Mrs. Nelson is going to have a baby, and she took the whole three months off."

"You're kidding! What about working at the Pizza Paddle?"

"I can't," Summer mumbled.

"Summer, do you realize how much time and effort went into my nagging Dad until he agreed to let us work there?"

Summer sat in dejected silence while she considered her bleak future. There wasn't any hope, she decided. What other fifteen-year-old girl stayed home all summer? Probably none. And this was the summer that she and Regina had vowed they would make some new friends and meet some really cute older guys. They had both agreed to turn over a new leaf, too, starting with their looks. Summer had decided that her wardrobe was entirely too juvenile, for one thing. The money she'd been planning to make at the Pizza Paddle would have enabled her to buy some really great clothes. Well, that was definitely out now. Mom and Dad couldn't afford to pay her more than a few dollars a week for baby-sitting. It would take her most of the summer just to have enough to buy new jeans!

"You're going to be stuck here all summer?"

Regina made it sound as if Summer had been sentenced to Siberia. Of course, taking care of Michael and her grandfather was probably just as bad, Summer thought, then immediately felt guilty.

"But what about our plans?" Regina's stubborn streak was asserting itself. She was just as disappointed as Summer, and that fact made Summer feel somewhat better. "You'll never meet anyone if you don't get out there and circulate. That's what is so super about working at the Pizza Paddle. Everyone goes there on Friday nights. You know that!"

"I know, I know," Summer said. "But there isn't anything I can do about it. I tried to talk to Dad, but when he started his 'A Family Is a Team' lecture, I knew it was a lost cause."

"Ann Logan is having a swim party next week," Regina said, changing the subject.

"Oh, how splendid." Summer's voice reeked with sarcasm. Splendid was one of Ann's favorite words, and Ann was one of Summer's least favorite persons.

"Your claws are showing," Regina said with a giggle. "Just because she stole Eric from you..."

"Don't start," Summer demanded. "And she did not steal him from me. I never had him to begin with, remember? That was all in your mind."

Ann Logan was definitely a thorn in Summer's side. As soon as Ann had found out Summer was interested in Eric, she'd moved right in. Eric was helpless before Ann's practiced assault. He never stood a chance.

"Do you think she uses something on her hair? It's getting more and more streaked, I noticed."

"Who cares? She still looks like a Barbie doll with that plastic smile of hers. And the way she bats those lashes, you'd think she had a tic or something."

"Well, she has to be nice to me," Regina said. "She still hasn't given up on Gregg."

"How can your brother stand her? Honestly, Michael has a better vocabulary than she does, and she acts so...phony. I don't think she can hold a serious thought for more than ten seconds." The disgust was obvious in Summer's voice.

"Oh, all the boys like to have girls gush over them. That's our problem, Summer. We just aren't gushy enough. Anyway, I was invited to the party because of Gregg, that's for sure. We both know she really doesn't like me. She doesn't like any girl, for that matter. Maybe I won't go if you're not invited."

"You have to go. This will be the perfect opportunity for you to meet some new boys. With Ann's reputation to maintain, I'm sure there will be an abundance of --"

"-- gorgeous guys surrounding her," Regina said. "We're supposed to bring dates," Regina added. "I guess I could ask Carl Benson. He's tall enough. If only he didn't tend to lisp..."

"He does not lisp," Summer argued. "And if he does, it's because of his braces. Besides, once you get there, you can --"

"-- circulate," Regina finished for her. "You're right. I'll ask Carl. I wish you were going though. I...Wait! I've got it! You can go with Gregg."

"Oh, I don't know --"

"He'll do it," Regina interrupted, a glint entering her brown eyes. "He owes me, Summer. I'll tell him tonight."

"Let me think about it first," Summer stalled.

"Look, we both said we need to take advantage of every opportunity if we're going to change our images. Hermits don't meet many new people. Think about that."

"Okay, okay."

"I have to go. I'll call you later."

"Fine," Summer replied. She followed Regina to the front door, dodging toy cars and trucks along the way. It would take her most of the afternoon to clean up Michael's mess. And he'd made the clutter in less than ten minutes.

"Want to do something tonight?" Regina asked.

"Can't. It's bingo night."

"Poor Summer...Maybe your grandfather won't want to go tonight."

When it snows in July, Summer thought. "No chance. And don't say 'Poor Summer,'" she demanded. "I feel bad enough as it is."

Copyright © 1986 by Julie Garwood

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 19 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2008

    A normal teen who loves a good book!

    This book absolutely blew me away. Its so easy for teens to relate to. Summer is such a realistic, down to earth person, and that was just the beginning. I loved the way she went to family and friends to fix the problem she knew she started. David was amazing. He seemed like a classic guy and definetly made this book what it is. I reccomend this to any teen, anywhere, at any time.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2004

    This book was the best book I've ever read!

    I loved this book so much I read it in 2 days!( because I stopped reading for little bits at a time) I really want Julie Garwood to write another story about Summer and David. If she did it would be the first book I would read of the Summer or winter or whatever. I am so glad that I actually got to read this book. If I hadn't I would have missed out on the best book of my life! I am so thankful that Julie Garwood wrote this book! :)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2003

    Great Book

    This book was terrific, but I have read better. This book had a great storyline and it was very realistic. This book is great for yong readers, and I have enjoyed reading this book in my spare tome.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2002

    a wonderful book

    this was one of the best books i have ever read. i recommend it for teenagers becuase most teenagers are going through what she went through. well written!!!!! definaly 5 stars!

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2001

    A great love story

    I loved this story. It tells a relationship that is very realistic. It has all problems a teenage relationship truely has. It is nice and easy to understand. I would recomend it for any age. I wish there were more books like this. This is one of Julie Garwoods best!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2001

    Great Book

    I did like this book a lot, but I have read a lot better. I would suggest it to a lot of people! It is truly a god book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2013

    Taryn

    Okay. Im a girl too. Dark brown hair and hazel eyes.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2013

    Slasher

    Growls

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2013

    loved it!!!

    loved it so much i am getting it for my grandaughters.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 12, 2013

    I'm still not sure if I liked this book

    Being an adult, this was a sweet story, but I'm just not sure if this would hold a tween's attention. It has a great moral that is taught about lying and consequences as well as jumping to conclusions and self-image, but I hope it will conquer and help young adults.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2001

    The Best Report!

    ¿A Girl Named Summer¿ Book Review Did you know that every time you read a book or an article your vocabulary increases by 4 percent. Well, in my spare time I have been reading a book called, ¿A Girl Named Summer¿. I enjoyed reading it very much. Overall, I would say that the book was adventurous, thrilling, amusing, and just plain out entertaining. The content of the book was a job well done by the author. The book was obviously written to teach young teenagers about some life lessons to help them when they are in uncomfortable situations. I feel that the author wrote this story to inform young readers that it is okay to be yourself around people you really like. For example, if you want someone to like you and accept you in their life, you shouldn¿t act like someone that you¿re not in front of them. Then that person will assume that you are just like them. Which can¿t be very good in the future when it turns out that this person is absolutely obsessed with you! Now, I would like to talk about the style of the book. This book was arranged in its own unique way. I feel that the book was perfect by the scenery and the person¿s content in the story. For example, each character in the story was imagined well by the author. Each character seems life-like to me and does not seem to be made up by the writer or fake from the lack of not actually knowing the person. The scenery in the story is described very well. I pictured everything that was spoken of in the story. It is described as a real town. The protagonist¿s house has descriptive features about it that I feel you can only see in real life. The language of the book was awesome! You seem like you are really there in the book. It is set in present time. The language is used with slang in the text. Instead of using philosophical speech or old English patterns the author used recent language terms to write the story. The tone of the story is supposed to be a romantic novel. It sticks with the romanticism throughout the entire book. I felt impacted in certain parts in the story, which had to do with passionate feelings between two people. Overall, I loved the book I read called, ¿A Girl Named Summer¿. It was, perhaps, the best book I have ever read in my entire lifetime. The story was great to me because of many ways that the book was written by the author. In summary, I feel this way because of the content in the book. The style that the book was written, the language that supported the story, and the tone that the author set for me.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 19 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)