A Girl's Guide to Life: The Truth on Growing Up, Being Real, and Making Your Teen Years Fabulous!

Overview

A Girl's Guide to
Life
offers girls a fun, healthy approach to facing their adolescent years.

This complete resource helps teenage girls deal with all the traumas, dramas, and triumphs in their lives. The book is divided into Body,
Mind, and Soul sections to address the relevant issues in each area of a young woman’s life. It’s "the" book ...

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Overview

A Girl's Guide to
Life
offers girls a fun, healthy approach to facing their adolescent years.

This complete resource helps teenage girls deal with all the traumas, dramas, and triumphs in their lives. The book is divided into Body,
Mind, and Soul sections to address the relevant issues in each area of a young woman’s life. It’s "the" book for any girl wondering what’s happening to her body, soul, and mind during these crazy years.

Revised and updated to include information on texting,
sexting, and the viral cultural in which teens live, this book will help girls navigate their way through what can be a very tumultuous time in life.

With conversations with real teen girls, a foundation on God and the Bible, and helpful tips and questions for the reader, girls will gain an encouraging and fresh perspective on their lives.

A Girl's Guide to Life offers teen girls a new approach to facing their adolescent years.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781400315949
  • Publisher: Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
  • Publication date: 6/22/2010
  • Pages: 212
  • Sales rank: 392,111
  • Age range: 13 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Katie Meier's writing serves readers a new kind of personal empowerment based on inner honesty and a common-sense approach to the world we face. This message runs throughout her books A Girl's Guide to Life and in her work on the Revolve: Psalms and Proverbs Bible.

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 13, 2010

    A Girl's Guide to Life and More!

    I read this book once on my own, but enjoyed it, so I also read it with my 3 girls. I found it to be pretty encompassing. It discussed everything from friends to body changes. Many of the chapters brought on conversation between my girls and I. It was a great opportunity to learn a bit about my girls, and for them to be able to talk to me.
    One part that I thought was very unique compared to other books of this type was the spiritual references. This was a nice addition. There was no real feel of "preaching" about the topics, but there was reference to it. The spiritual aspect was there for you to take in as you wanted to, but it was not in your face.
    The book didn't tell you what to do, what to expect, what to feel. It told you different levels of what teen girls are experiencing. Both my girls and I enjoyed the book very much. I have given it to my 11 year old daughter to reference as she would like to.

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  • Posted August 10, 2010

    Not Quite the "Real Deal"

    Writing in a handbook style, Katie Meier seeks to give teenage girls a go-to place to ask the tough questions about what it means to grow up. A Girls Guide to Life aims to give girls the "Real Deal" when it comes to questions about boys, religion, their bodies, sex, peer pressure and more. Unfortunately, Meier seeks to answer these questions without relying on very much Scripture. Buried in the introduction, Meier relates her belief that one of the necessary factors in applying the answers to all these questions is a "Christ-infused strength." Sadly, that is one of very few references to that strength or where it can be found. The author seems swayed by an admittedly feminist upbringing as she parades self-esteem and self-assurance out as the first virtues a girl must have to get along. While she often includes solid practical advice and answers, Meier obscures the good bits of this book with frivolity, cultural pandering (unable to take a hard stand on counter-cultural ideas), and an over-emphasis on independence, rights, and being true to one's own self--all that mired in the language of today's self-help culture. I cannot recommend taking the author's advice by allowing this book to be a way your daughter can get answers to questions that she is too afraid to ask you. If anything, read it together with a Bible at hand and talk about it as you go.


    *Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted June 27, 2010

    Review for A Girls Guide To Life

    I absolutly loved the cover. The purple and the black and white photo complimented each other so well and the cover photo was just inviting! I had very high hopes for the book after seeing such an inviting, warm cover.

    The book is divided into three sections: mind, body, and soul. The book starts right off by saying that a girl should be confident in herself and not let her mind play tricks on her that she isn't good enough.

    Reading a little more through the book, I began to get very disappointed because this book is for Christian girls and there were only about 5 verses if even that in the whole book. The book didn't always say which way was the way God wanted us to go. I felt like the book was for girls who were new Christians instead of girls who wanted to grow in their relationship with the Lord.

    Other than the disappointing fact that there were not many Biblical refferances, it did talk about friendship, gossip, and bullying, which is what most girls go through. During this section it pointed back to the begining of the book where it said not to let this push you areound because you deserve better.

    My favorite part was at the end, where the book talks about what a girl can become when she is older. Being some one who loves to have everything planned out I loved reading it and I actually read this chapter twice. The author gives an example about how she was so into snowboarding and knew that it would be her favorite sport through adulthood and then she fell in love with rock climbing. The chapter also mentioned that we can choose chapter traits from ladies, like our mom, to choose personality traits from that we want to have when we are older.

    Another thing that I didn't really care for about the book was the fact that on the back of the books it says that it answers questions you wouldn't want to ask your mother. I didn't like that because we are supposed to honor our parents and have a close relationship with them, not just ignore and dishonor them.

    In conclusion, here is what part of the back of the book says:
    Why do boys act so weird? Why am I so emotional? And what's with these huge zits?!?!

    You're not a little girl anymore...but you're nost an adult yet either. Instead, you're caught somewhere in the middle. Your body's changing-you-re definitely feeling things you've never felt before. So now you have questions-questions you don't want to ask your mother. Some are serious, some are funny, and some are just embarrassing!

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  • Posted June 26, 2010

    a girl's guide to life

    As a mother of two daughters, I read this book with them in mind, knowing that someday they would read it. I can honestly say that I am looking forward to them doing so, and then discussing it with me. This book focuses on real issues that girl's face everyday, and may not be comfortable discussing with anyone else. While I may not agree with all the advice, I do think a lot of what is discussed is right on target. I would definitely recommend this book to mom's of teen aged girl's and their daughters. It a great tool for opening the lines of communication.

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  • Posted June 18, 2010

    A Good Introduction, but Not the Final Answer

    This book covered a lot, but seemed to skim over many of these subjects. Friendships, family relationships, religion, body changes in girls AND boys, emotions, eating disorders, abuse, and rape were all covered. So was sexting (which didn't even exist when I was a tween.) A lot of the advice given in the book was based in Christianity (which makes sense, since it's about how to grow up as a Christian girl.) and while I ascribe to this advice and the author does admit that not all Christian girls are perfect, there are still many more potential obstacles that were not covered in as much detail as I would have preferred my future children to know.

    For instance, in the section about sexually transmitted diseases, the author states that HIV/AIDS kills. With treatments these days, people can live a relatively normal life with HIV/AIDS, if caught early. On the other hand, the author covered eating disorders (a topic my family struggles with) very well - offering signs to look for and hotlines and more information if you or someone you know exhibits these signs. Homosexuality is covered as "this is an option, but if you're Christian, you probably won't feel this way because the Bible says so" (true, by Christian standards, but that doesn't mean a Christian girl won't feel that way.)

    Overall, the book was a good introduction to life as a teenage girl and what to expect. However, this book would not be complete without a thorough conversation with a girl's parents and/or trusted adult. In reality, that's probably a good thing (girls really need to develop a relationship with a trusted adult at this stage!)

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com &lt;http://BookSneeze.com&gt; book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 &lt;http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html&gt; : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted June 15, 2010

    Must read for all Christian teens.

    "A Girl's Guide To Life" by Katie Meier - The truth on growing up, being true, and making your teen years fabulous!

    This book covers all the basic things that a teen girl should know, and anything that they may have questions about. Divided into three sections - mind, body, and soul, the book is easy to flip through and find exactly the information you are wanting to know. It basically covers everything, from friends to sex to religion to boys, and the changes that a teenage girl's body is going through.

    The information is very direct and not "sugar-coated", giving you everything you need to know and making it a quick and easy read.

    Information about support centers for teen pregnancy, abuse, etc. are included, along with phone numbers and websites, which was very neat.

    Katie really stresses the importance of God in a teen girl's life throughout these changes that she is going through, and that she needs to have a firm relationship with Christ before she jumps into anything else, including boys.

    There is an informative section about sex and sexuality (which I do not recommend for anyone under 14) that gives answers to basically any questions that a teen girl may have about sex, but would rather not openly ask a parent or adult about.

    Katie goes through the development of different body parts, and what is happening with a teen girls body as she grows into womanhood. She also goes through changes in a male body and puberty, but this is not as detailed.

    There is a great section about boys that tells whats going on with them through these years, what they are feeling and thinking, and what girls should do aboout them.

    This book was wonderful and informative, and every teen girl should read this as a guide to live a good life focused on God.

    I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com &lt;http://BookSneeze.com&gt; book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 &lt;http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html&gt; : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted June 13, 2010

    A Girl's Guide to Life

    Growing up, I remember reading books that were written for teenagers. Dating books and such. And I remember wondering whether the concepts they were telling me about were really how they were in real life. Because they would all say it was real, but so do the movies. And even if it was real for the author, does that mean the concept is universal and it's real for me too? Therefore, I wasn't a very good judge of whether these books targeted to teenage girls were actually good or not. I might have thought they were good, but without the personal life experience, how would I really know?

    So when I saw this book, I figured it would be a good opportunity to find out if it's really real. Now that I'm out of those teenage years and on to the next phase in my life, I am at a better place to judge whether these kinds of books are good or not.

    Having said that, there were things about this book that were very good. She addresses uncomfortable issues, and not just the cliche ones that you always read about. She splits the book into three categories: mind, body, and soul. Some topics in the "mind" portion include self-esteem, prejudices, and "the digital you." This last one was a good topic that needs to be addressed with young ladies today. Meier talks about online etiquette and just plain common sense. Saying be careful how you portray yourself online. Facebook, text messages, etc. Some topics in the "body" section include beauty, sex/sexuality, guys. Some topics in the "soul" category include religion, service, and family.

    Meier is very straightforward. She tells her audience that a lot of the things that you might think are a big deal now, really aren't that major in the big picture. It's so hard to remember that as a teenage girl. The guy you like wants you to do something you aren't comfortable with, so dump him because he doesn't deserve you anyways. Easier said than done, right? She is also brutally honest about beauty and how it is viewed by society. She says that people can tell you that looks don't matter, but they do. And she's right. It's not a good thing, but she's right.

    One of the things I didn't like about this book is that I couldn't decide whether this was supposed to be from a Christian perspective or not. At times, she addresses her audience as though she assumes they are Christians. But then she would say things that made me wonder. For example, at one point she was talking about girls who view relationships with their heart vs. their head. She had some good points that I liked, especially telling girls that being overly dramatically romantic is completely unrealistic. You know the love-struck ones that are obsessed with a certain guy and write their names w/the guy's last name even though the guy doesn't know they exist.. She contrasted that with the girls who are overly rational about relationships. She said that girls like that can sometimes end up in relationships where they end up "playing house" and living with their boyfriend eventually. But she didn't say anything about how that's not how relationships should work. She didn't clarify (because maybe she doesn't believe) that sex before marriage is unacceptable to God. And there were a few other instances like that, where she didn't exactly condone certain behavior, but mentioned it in passing without making in clear that is shouldn't be done.

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  • Posted June 13, 2010

    Book review for A Girl's Guide to Life by Katie Meier

    A Girl's Guide to Life is exactly that - an extremely helpful guide geared toward teenage girls covering a variety of subjects from social networking to eating disorders to dating and relationships.

    A Girl's Guide to Life charmingly begins with a history lesson about a woman's "role" in society dating back to the 1950s and how it has evolved over the decades to present time. Meier then segues into chapters on self-esteem, romance, and eventually my favorite chapter entitled "Going Online and the Digital You", which indirectly explains how to be tactful and appropriate when texting and using social media applications on the internet. Kudos to Meier for smartly approaching this subject which is so important to address in this day and age!

    Throughout the book, Meier has sprinkled throughout each chapter some popular myths and their accurate truths; for example, on the subject of prejudice and perception, Meier says:

    Big Myth: Stereotyping people isn't a big deal.
    Real Deal: Stereotyping people leads to prejudice.

    A Girl's Guide to Life is a refreshing and modern spin on all issues and obstacles teenagers face; definitely a must-read for young women who seek direction or just plain factual information. I think every woman has possessed a book like this at some point during their teenage years, and has proved vital to survival during that timeframe (at least for me!). I was happy to see A Girl's Guide to Life avoid the usually prevalent diagrams of male and female anatomy and lessons on reproduction. Ha!

    Furthermore, although A Girl's Guide to Life is geared toward Christian teens, it will appeal to ANY young woman looking to preserve values no matter what her religion. I largely applaud Meier because toward the end of the book in the chapter on religion she describes and defines each religion factually with no speculation or opinion. Nicely and professionally done!

    Katie Meier is also the author of Same God, Different Churches.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Posted June 13, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Where was this book when I was a teen?

    In this book for teen girls, Katie Meier blends an informal tone with serious subject matter. "A Girl's Guide to Life" addresses topics such as prejudice, eating disorders, and sexuality. The approach is straightforward, from a Christian point of view. Meier divides the book into Mind, Body, and Soul sections,with chapters on beauty, health, and self-esteem. Big Myth/Real Deal sections separate facts from popular misconceptions. Brief workbook-style question and answer pages, as well as charts and tables, provide at-a-glance understanding.

    I wish I could have read this book when I was a teen. Although this book addresses contemporary issues such as AIDS an internet social networking, timeless truths are present in Meier's advice. Meier writes in a style that is accessible to teens, without talking down to her readers. I highly recommend "A Girl's Guide to Life" for the teen girl in your life, perhaps as a birthday gift.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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