BN.com Gift Guide

A Grand Old Tree

( 2 )

Overview


THE GIVING TREE for our time.

Once there was a grand old tree, whose roots sank deep into the earth and whose arms reached high into the sky. Every spring the grand old tree flowered and bore cherries for the squirrels and birds that made their homes in her leafy branches. And every year, seeds from the tree scattered in the wind, along with many millions of leaves. Mary Newell DePalma creates an emotional tale of life and renewal, of nature's bounty and quiet balance, ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (15) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $10.30   
  • Used (7) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview


THE GIVING TREE for our time.

Once there was a grand old tree, whose roots sank deep into the earth and whose arms reached high into the sky. Every spring the grand old tree flowered and bore cherries for the squirrels and birds that made their homes in her leafy branches. And every year, seeds from the tree scattered in the wind, along with many millions of leaves. Mary Newell DePalma creates an emotional tale of life and renewal, of nature's bounty and quiet balance, illustrated with simple images made powerful with vivid colors and moving compositions.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Kirkus 11/1/05
"Once there was a grand old tree." So begins this lovely, spare story of the life cycle of a dogwood tree, with nary a human in sight to sentimentalize (or speed up) the process. Indeed, through all four seasons, this ever-changing grand old tree is home to birds, squirrels and bugs. She flowers, bears red fruit, loses and regrows her leaves, sows seeds and has many children, spread far and wide. Over the years, she basks in the sun, bathes in the rain, sways in the breeze and dances in the wind until she can sway and dance no more. When she's very old, she falls over and dies, but as a log she still provides a home to many creatures and her offspring keep on keepin' on. DePalma's delicate tissue-paper collage and watercolor illustrations (with miscellaneous fibers) are winningly simple and her big-eyed animals are sweetly comical, especially the fruit-munching squirrel buddies and the fat, leaf-sailing ladybugs. A winsome introduction to the cycles of life. (Picture book. 4-8)

Booklist 11/15/05
\\\\\\\\Depalma, Mary Newell. The Grand Old Tree. Nov. 2005. 32p. illus. Scholastic/Arthur A. Levine, $16.99 (0-439-62334-0).
PreS–Gr. 1. For many years a tree flourishes. It shelters birds, squirrels, and insects while flowering, bearing fruit, shedding leaves, and providing seeds that grow into many new trees. After the old tree dies, it still provides a home to animals and insects as it slowly decomposes. Meanwhile, its offspring grow and flourish, “home to many creatures, just like the grand old tree.” The simple text conveys the tree's life and death in a matter-of-fact way, but with well-chosen words that are poetic in the economy of their expression and the precision of their imagery. On one page, words combine with an illustration to form a concrete poem, with the text forming the shape of the trunk and the ground and the picture representing the tree's crown, the sky, and a bird. Neither sentimental nor unfeeling, this appealing picture book offers an appreciation of the cycle of life through a story that is accessible to young children. –Carolyn Phelan
SLJ 12/1/05
DEPALMA, Mary Newell. A Grand Old Tree. illus. by author. unpaged. CIP. Scholastic/Arthur A. Levine Bks. 2005. Tr $16.99. ISBN 0-439-62334-0. LC 2004023407.
PreS-Gr 2–The life cycle of a tree is introduced through deceptively simple text and art. DePalma's short, measured phrases turn facts about a tree's growth, “her” seasonal changes, and the home “she” provides to a variety of creatures into an ode to an often-overlooked part of the natural world. The fact that the tree is given a female persona makes “her” seem that much more alive than if “she” were an “it.” “Her roots sank deep into the earth, her arms reached high into the sky.” The art superbly complements the writing. The use of white space to set off the child-inspired illustration style allows the words to stand out and makes the entire design clear and crisp. The tree's demise on a winter evening is particularly striking. Perfect for storyhour and for beginning readers, this book will make a grand addition to most collections.–Maura Bresnahan, High Plain Elementary School, Andover, MA

Publishers Weekly
With shades of Shel Silverstein's The Giving Tree, yet devoid of human interference, DePalma's (My Chair) cycle-of-life tale will draw readers in with its breezy, whimsical illustrations and straightforward text. The chartreuse and kelly green tree at the center of the story moves through the seasons, bearing small red fruit and creating new life (e.g., "She had many children. They changed the landscape for miles around"). The large-canopied matron also supports a host of birds, squirrels and ladybugs, whose wide-eyed expressions add a comical touch that will likely enhance the book's appeal to the younger set. In one spread, red and blue-spotted ladybugs surf, slide and hang glide using the tree's fuchsia and orange falling leaves. The stylized shapes of the watercolor and torn-paper art emanate a carefree, childlike feel, while a gentle but matter-of-fact narrative marches the tale forward. The tree comes to her end in a poignant couple of spreads. "At last the grand old tree was very, very old. Her branches no longer swayed and danced.... Finally she fell, and snow gently covered her." DePalma skillfully keeps the bleakness at bay by recounting what the dead tree continues to provide (shelter, enriched soil) and reminding readers that the tree's legacy lives on in her descendants. Older readers may recognize and appreciate the metaphor for all life. Ages 4-8. (Nov.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-The life cycle of a tree is introduced through deceptively simple text and art. DePalma's short, measured phrases turn facts about a tree's growth, "her" seasonal changes, and the home "she" provides to a variety of creatures into an ode to an often-overlooked part of the natural world. The fact that the tree is given a female persona makes "her" seem that much more alive than if "she" were an "it." "Her roots sank deep into the earth, her arms reached high into the sky." The art superbly complements the writing. The use of white space to set off the child-inspired illustration style allows the words to stand out and makes the entire design clear and crisp. The tree's demise on a winter evening is particularly striking. Perfect for storyhour and for beginning readers, this book will make a grand addition to most collections.-Maura Bresnahan, High Plain Elementary School, Andover, MA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
"Once there was a grand old tree." So begins this lovely, spare story of the life cycle of a dogwood tree, with nary a human in sight to sentimentalize (or speed up) the process. Indeed, through all four seasons, this ever-changing grand old tree is home to birds, squirrels and bugs. She flowers, bears red fruit, loses and regrows her leaves, sows seeds and has many children, spread far and wide. Over the years, she basks in the sun, bathes in the rain, sways in the breeze and dances in the wind until she can sway and dance no more. When she's very old, she falls over and dies, but as a log she still provides a home to many creatures and her offspring keep on keepin' on. DePalma's delicate tissue-paper collage and watercolor illustrations (with miscellaneous fibers) are winningly simple and her big-eyed animals are sweetly comical, especially the fruit-munching squirrel buddies and the fat, leaf-sailing ladybugs. A winsome introduction to the cycles of life. (Picture book. 4-8)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780439623346
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/28/2005
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 446,192
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 460L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.74 (w) x 11.30 (h) x 0.38 (d)

Meet the Author


Mary Newell DePalma is an author and illustrator of children’s books. Before Mary was a children's book author and illustrator, she knitted designer sweaters, interpreted for the deaf, and painted signs. Some of her hobbies include gardening, knitting, reading, and, of course, drawing! She has illustrated MY CHAIR, A GRAND OLD TREE, and THE NUTCRACKER DOLL for Arthur A. Levine Books. Mary lives in Boston with her husband and two children.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)