A-Ha Shake Heartbreak

A-Ha Shake Heartbreak

4.4 22
by Kings of Leon
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

On their debut album, Youth and Young Manhood, this all-in-the-family combo -- think Hanson after a trip down to the crossroads -- exhibited a virtually nonstop swagger. That made for a compelling vibe but less-than-memorable songs, a shortcoming they’ve rectified on this slightly mellower, considerably more clear-eyed follow-up. Still well rooted in southernSee more details below

Overview

On their debut album, Youth and Young Manhood, this all-in-the-family combo -- think Hanson after a trip down to the crossroads -- exhibited a virtually nonstop swagger. That made for a compelling vibe but less-than-memorable songs, a shortcoming they’ve rectified on this slightly mellower, considerably more clear-eyed follow-up. Still well rooted in southern rock tradition, the Followills conjure up the spirit of Duane Allman on the slithery “Day Old Blues” -- on which Matthew’s guitar and Caleb’s vocal do the sort of dance that could only be concocted by good old boys born under a bad sign. But rather than merely boogie the night away, the quartet takes off in some unexpected directions, adding off-kilter polyrhythms to “King of the Rodeo” and a Spectorsound grandiosity to “The Bucket.” A musky energy permeates a good deal of the disc -- from the lustful “Taper Jean Girl” to the near-elegiac “Slow Nights, So Long” -- which can be credited in equal parts to the live-in-the-studio recording process and the natural rawness of Caleb’s voice. Ideal for a late night’s debauching, and not so bad for the morning after, either.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - James Christopher Monger
The mysterious Followill family returns to the front porch/garage on the Kings of Leon's engaging sophomore effort, Aha Shake Heartbreak. On Youth & Young Manhood, the Kings gave Southern rock a swift kick in the rear, sounding like Lynyrd Skynyrd posing as a bunch of N.Y.U. film students (or vice versa). For their latest, the Nashville quartet raises a flag that's equal parts Confederate and Union Jack. Their success in the U.K. is understandable, as Caleb Followill's lazy drawl sounds like a cross between Bon Scott, Ray Davies, and Eddie Money with a slight Jamaican accent, but it's their seamless and agreeable blend of rock & roll, country, and Roky Erickson-style psychedelia, matched with a keen lyrical wit, that makes them fascinating to both sides of the pond. On the twenty-something barfly opener "Slow Night, So Long," Caleb laments/celebrates the soulless dance of the one-night stand ("She's opened up just like she really knows me/I hate her face, but enjoy the company") like a true student of outlaw country. It's a theme that runs rampant throughout Heartbreak, and whether it's set against a swamp-sick boogie ("Pistol of Fire") or emitted through a lonesome yodel ("Day Old Blues"), it resonates as clear and cool as the opening notes of a Creedence Clearwater Revival tune.

Product Details

Release Date:
02/22/2005
Label:
Rca
UPC:
0828766454420
catalogNumber:
64544
Rank:
168082

Tracks

Read More

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Kings of Leon   Primary Artist
Ethan Johns   Piano,Keyboards
Caleb Followill   Guitar,Pipe,Vocals
Nathan Followill   Drums
Matthew Followill   Guitar

Technical Credits

Ethan Johns   Producer,Engineer,Audio Production
Brett Kilroe   Art Direction
Jacquire King   Engineer
Ken Levitan   Management
Angelo   Producer,Audio Production
Caleb Followill   Composer
Nathan Followill   Composer
Jared Followill   Composer
Matthew Followill   Composer
Robin C. Hendrickson   Art Direction
Emily Deaderick   Publicity
Jakub Blackman   Publicity
Ken Weinstein   Publicity

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >