A Handbook of Poetics for Students of English Verse [NOOK Book]

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III.— DRAMATIC POETRY. The Epic deals with the past, the Lyric with the present. The Drama unites the two conditions, and gives us the past in the present. Events are the epic basis ; but they unroll themselves before our ...
See more details below
A Handbook of Poetics for Students of English Verse

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - Digitized from 1886 volume)
FREE

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III.— DRAMATIC POETRY. The Epic deals with the past, the Lyric with the present. The Drama unites the two conditions, and gives us the past in the present. Events are the epic basis ; but they unroll themselves before our eyes. We have the epic objectivity — i.e., the sinking of the author's own thought and feeling in the work itself — in the lifelike course of events; we have lyric fire in the different characters. What lyric can match, for example, Hamlet's beautiful tribute to friendship (Ham. m. 2] ; what love-songs compare with the passion of the exquisite little Tagelied, in Romeo and Juliet [in. 5] where the lovers part at daybreak ? What reflective lyric strikes a deeper note than Hamlet's famous soliloquy on death ? — A drama, then, may be called an epic whole made up of lyric parts. Aristotle's definition is imitated action; which is about the same thing. The lyric element in the drama makes it more rapid, more tumultuous than the epic, which, at its best, holds an even and stately pace. § I. BEGINNINGS OF THE DRAMA. The drama is no exception to the rule concerning the origin of poetry; it begins in religious rites. We shall here confine ourselves to the modern drama, particularly the English, and trace its beginnings and development up to the time of Shakspere. [For a wider survey of the drama in general, see Ward's article "Drama" in the Encyclopedia Britannica; for theEnglish, see the same author's English Dramatic Literature The Greek drama began in the Dionysian feasts; our modern drama in the rites of the early Christian church. These were elaborate and impressive. By certain ceremonies — such as the Mass — effort was made to change the past history of the church into a present fact. The epic part, as Ward points out, was the reading of the Scri...
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940023685373
  • Publisher: Ginn
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1886 volume
  • File size: 400 KB

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER III.— DRAMATIC POETRY. The Epic deals with the past, the Lyric with the present. The Drama unites the two conditions, and gives us the past in the present. Events are the epic basis ; but they unroll themselves before our eyes. We have the epic objectivity — i.e., the sinking of the author's own thought and feeling in the work itself — in the lifelike course of events; we have lyric fire in the different characters. What lyric can match, for example, Hamlet's beautiful tribute to friendship (Ham. m. 2] ; what love-songs compare with the passion of the exquisite little Tagelied, in Romeo and Juliet [in. 5] where the lovers part at daybreak ? What reflective lyric strikes a deeper note than Hamlet's famous soliloquy on death ? — A drama, then, may be called an epic whole made up of lyric parts. Aristotle's definition is imitated action; which is about the same thing. The lyric element in the drama makes it more rapid, more tumultuous than the epic, which, at its best, holds an even and stately pace. § I. BEGINNINGS OF THE DRAMA. The drama is no exception to the rule concerning the origin of poetry; it begins in religious rites. We shall here confine ourselves to the modern drama, particularly the English, and trace its beginnings and development up to the time of Shakspere. [For a wider survey of the drama in general, see Ward's article "Drama" in the Encyclopedia Britannica; for theEnglish, see the same author's English Dramatic Literature The Greek drama began in the Dionysian feasts; our modern drama in the rites of the early Christian church. These were elaborate and impressive. By certain ceremonies — such as the Mass — effort was madeto change the past history of the church into a present fact. The epic part, as Ward points out, was the reading of the Scri...
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)