A Heideggerian Phenomenological Investigation of Money

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It is neither the whole or the structure of Heidegger's philosophy that is valuable, claims Hammond, only the material he used to build his phenomenological method. Breaking new ground, he applies that method to an investigation of money, an application neither the German philosopher himself nor any of his adherents have previously undertaken. He considers the method he uses, the theory of intentionality, why Heidegger never investigated money phenomenologically, some basic ontological conclusions about money ...
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Overview

It is neither the whole or the structure of Heidegger's philosophy that is valuable, claims Hammond, only the material he used to build his phenomenological method. Breaking new ground, he applies that method to an investigation of money, an application neither the German philosopher himself nor any of his adherents have previously undertaken. He considers the method he uses, the theory of intentionality, why Heidegger never investigated money phenomenologically, some basic ontological conclusions about money emerging from the application, reduction and destruction, construction, and value in the monetary sense of the word. The text is double spaced. Subjects are not indexed.

Annotation © Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

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Product Details

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Introduction 1
A preliminary remark concerning the tradition's attitude towards money 5
Philosophising with the method of Phenomenology 8
Ch. 2 Heidegger's theory of intentionality 17
The perceptual comportment 19
The common sense misinterpretation of the perceptual comportment 23
The theoretical misinterpretation of the perceptual comportment and the problem of transcendence 24
The productive comportment 30
Ch. 3 Common sense explanation of why Heidegger passed over money 37
First difference between the use of equipment and the exchange of money 45
Second difference between money and equipment 51
Ch. 4 Money and the tradition 59
Why Heidegger neglected to consider money philosophically? 59
Why the tradition neglected to consider money philosophically 62
The extinction of the philosophical way of life 71
Heidegger's response to the criticism that philosophy is useless 73
Our response to the criticism that philosophy is useless 76
Ch. 5 Phenomenological destruction and reduction 85
Heidegger's interpretation of Descartes 85
Phenomenological interpretation of money: destruction 90
Aristotle and the nature of money 95
Critique of Meikle 97
Aristotle's analysis of place in the 'Physics' 98
Comparison between 'Nicomachean Ethics' 5.5 And 'Physics' Book 4 100
Around What is the logic of NE 5.5 Organised? 102
What is Aristotle's response to the problem of commensurability? 105
What is Aristotle's answer to the question: what is money? 111
Phenomenological interpretation of money: Reduction 113
Ch. 6 Phenomenological construction 119
Barter exchange and monetary exchange 120
The intentional character of exchange 124
Being-with as exchanging 127
Being-in as exchanging 131
The symmetrical character of exchange 137
Ch. 7 Phenomenological interpretation of value 147
What does the question of value ask? 147
Two ways of valuing beings 149
The sense of value that belongs to an existential starting point of everydayness 150
Money and qualitative value 153
Protagoras, Heidegger and the question of value 160
Ch. 8 Science, technology and money 177
Introduction to reprogenetics 182
Heidegger's conception of technology and its relation to reprogenetics 185
The relation between money and reprogenetics 196
The intentional character of reprogenetics 200
Stage I 201
Stage II 202
Stage III 203
Eugenics and money genes 205
Conclusion 215
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